Main definitions of rebate in English

: rebate1rebate2

rebate1

noun

  • 1A partial refund to someone who has paid too much for tax, rent, or a utility:

    ‘the scheme eases the move to the council tax by giving rebates in the first year’
    • ‘Generous tax relief and rebates provide incentives for higher income women to have more children.’
    • ‘Thus, if you have directed - or continue to pay - rebates into any old-style pension plans, it may be in your interest to switch these to a low-charging modern plan.’
    • ‘There could be so much more - tax incentives, rebates, credits, roads, grants, training and so on.’
    • ‘Optimism may be sustained for a while by redundancy payments, tax rebates, and by the belief that finding another job will be easy.’
    • ‘Nearly a quarter of North Yorkshire County Council's tenant farmers will qualify for rent rebates because they have been directly affected.’
    • ‘If you are on a low income you may be able to claim a rebate on your rent and council tax.’
    • ‘Utility rebates can be obtained to make the financial deal even sweeter.’
    • ‘And because credit unions are run for the benefit of their members, a borrower may get a rebate at the end of the year if the credit union is in surplus.’
    • ‘The tax rebate cheques issued during the summer should also prove helpful in this regard.’
    • ‘Finally, the presence of utility rebates or other financial incentives tends to skew acceptance of new devices.’
    • ‘Government hopes that federal income tax rebates could kick-start the US economy appear to have been left unfulfilled.’
    • ‘A total of 20 per cent of this is now allowable in Ireland, but tax rebates are, unfortunately, not a feature of double taxation treaties.’
    • ‘You just will not give them the information that they need to decide whether you are entitled to a rent rebate.’
    • ‘Incentives involve taxpayer dollars and take many forms, including tax rebates, training services, loans, grants, land and sometimes direct cash payments.’
    • ‘Second, consumers seem to be using their tax rebates to improve their balance sheets.’
    • ‘The difficulty will be that such a tax would be seen as yet another attack on the middle class, who could also face cuts to their pension contribution tax rebates and higher university tuition fees.’
    • ‘Tax rebates for dividends and capital gains will help reduce the cost of equity for companies in the knowledge sector.’
    • ‘Annual utility rebates crested in 1994 at about $2.7 billion.’
    • ‘There is some evidence of capitalist calculations for enclosure decisions; of calculations to assess the capital adequacy of tenants, to determine rent increases and rebates.’
    • ‘You can also see how the National Insurance rebates are calculated in this Inland Revenue leaflet.’
    refund, partial refund, repayment
    discount, deduction, reduction, decrease
    allowance, concession
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A deduction or discount on a sum of money due:
      ‘you will be entitled to a 20 per cent rebate off each standard fare’
      • ‘Yeo said the government will also extend current schemes for property tax rebates and rental rebates for another year.’
      • ‘Municipalities already receive partial rebates on many products deemed to be strictly of a municipal nature.’
      • ‘My 85 years old mother refuses to claim Pension Credit as she says that she will not be any better off as she will lose her rent and council tax rebates.’
      • ‘The 0% financing deals, rebates, and high-cost marketing programs have cut into price margins.’
      • ‘Indeed, some one-time factors that had pushed prices down, such as auto rebates and other financing offers, and a war-related drop in hotel room rates, reversed course in May.’
      • ‘Sales catalogues are often heavily financed by these sorts of rebates and discounts.’
      • ‘Best of all, when you buy a cell phone from us and transfer your number, you will still qualify for all of our great rebates and discounts.’
      • ‘That means consumers can expect rebates and cut-rate financing deals to continue and both companies will have to slow down their assembly lines.’
      • ‘In the 1990s, utilities across the country paid rebates to customers who retrofitted their lighting.’
      • ‘In particular, we analysed the six fundamental types of consumer promotion: coupons, rebates and refunds, sampling, loyalty and loading devices, sweepstakes, and premiums.’
      • ‘And even though a flood of rebates and cut-rate financing offers are helping Detroit move inventory, they're coming at a huge cost.’
      • ‘The industry over builds and offers incentives - discounts and rebates - thereby losing money on each car that never should have built in the first place.’
      • ‘Forced to lay on more cash-back rebates, cheap financing deals, and other costly incentives to try to empty dealer lots, they've seen profits squeezed.’
      • ‘Christmas shopping may be over but offers of rebates and discounts at various textile showrooms continue till the New Year.’
      • ‘I guess they must have great ways to make the money back from the rebate of all goods their customers buy in Hong Kong.’
      • ‘The loss will also take into account discounts and extra rebates offered to lure customers into buying its products.’
      • ‘According to the results, consumer appreciation of promotional offers in the performing arts is more positive when the offers are associated with sweepstakes than when they involve rebates or premiums.’
      • ‘They've grown addicted to the cash flow from sales fueled by financing and hefty rebates, and they've trained customers to expect a steady diet of the givebacks.’
      • ‘I think I should be able to find something with all or most of the above at about $1300 or so, with sales, discounts, rebates, etc.’
      • ‘Manufacturers sweeten the come-on with customer cash rebates and super-low financing.’
      refund, partial refund, repayment
      discount, deduction, reduction, decrease
      allowance, concession
      View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Pay back (a sum of money) as a rebate:

    ‘the government rebates part of your own and your employer's National Insurance contributions into the plan’
    • ‘Would this be to my benefit and would the tax that has been deducted be rebated?’
    • ‘And there's no reason why that same small percentage cannot be rebated in the form of stock to everyone who buys products from these companies.’
    • ‘The additional $20 in fees will be rebated back to individual chapters for each member of the chapter.’
    • ‘A North Dakota Senator has sponsored a bill that would tax profits when oil is above $40 a barrel and rebate the money to taxpayers.’
    • ‘Commissions are currently disclosed and most firms will also work on a fee basis, rebating any commissions.’
    • ‘And it recently took steps to ensure it gets its fair share of the profits by prohibiting independent travel agents from rebating portions of their commissions to customers as discounted fares.’
    • ‘Up to 10 percent of the money you spend on these products may be rebated into a college savings fund you set up for your child.’
    • ‘I half expected never to see the phone after putting it on my credit card, thus being unable to rebate anything and instead losing money.’
    • ‘This will be achieved by rebating underwriters' contributions to costs.’
    • ‘This will be achieved by rebating Underwriters' contribution to costs.’
    • ‘The party's platform calls for a 10-cent-a-litre increase on gasoline taxes over three years while rebating part of the purchase price on energy efficient vehicles.’
    • ‘The example shown here is not a selective oddity, many rebated vehicles have low depreciation.’
    • ‘The federal government agreed to rebate GST taxes paid by municipalities, netting Toronto some $50 million this year.’
    • ‘That's when fund managers rebate a portion of their fees to brokerages, based on how much client money that they put and keep in the fund family.’
    • ‘This category includes deposit-and-return systems, where ‘tax’ is rebated, and un-rebated taxes on environmentally unfriendly products such as cigarettes, certain types of energy, and certain chemicals.’
    • ‘Presumably the policy contains provision for rebating the premium, if the matter does not go to trial?’
    • ‘Some will even rebate some of their commission in the form of cashback.’
    • ‘Fund managers do not rebate the cost of commission because they do not want to undercut advisers.’
    • ‘Whilst those commissions may be rebated in full in many cases, it is the payment of that commission which, in fact, finances the whole of the financial planning process.’
    • ‘Some lenders plug in 12 months, requiring you to come up with more cash, and then rebate the difference at year-end.’

Origin

Late Middle English (as a verb in the sense ‘diminish (a sum or amount)’): from Anglo-Norman French rebatre beat back, also deduct.

Pronunciation

rebate

/ˈriːbeɪt/

Main definitions of rebate in English

: rebate1rebate2

rebate2

noun

  • A step-shaped recess cut along the edge or in the face of a piece of wood, typically forming a match to the edge or tongue of another piece:

    [as modifier] ‘a rebate joint’
    • ‘The glass check plough cuts both rebates at once, from the back edge of the bar.’
    • ‘Its windows have geometric tracery in the Decorated style, with rebates for hinged shutters.’
    • ‘After cutting the rebates the bar is then moved to the inner position of the sticking board where it is held by slotting the glazing rebate into the recess.’
    • ‘Use medium grade glasspaper to smooth the surface, before painting the rebate using an oil-based wood primer.’
    • ‘This holds the top firm but allows the rebate to slide in and out of the slot.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Make a rebate in (a piece of wood):

    ‘you can use it for rebating’
    ‘rebated blocks are glued in each corner’
    • ‘Stool in tubular steel with formed seat in ply laminate rebated onto frame, by Pengelly Design.’
    • ‘The proper long-term way is to drill out the hole, counter rebate to a larger hole and fit a turned disc - it will last forever.’
    • ‘Initially, it was hoped 5.56 M - 16 parts would do the trick for the conversion, and rebated 5.56 case heads were tried.’
    • ‘No rebating is required as the hinge sits on the surface of door and frame.’
    1. 1.1[with object and adverbial] Join or fix (a piece of wood) to another with a rebate:
      ‘the oak boarding was rebated in’

Origin

Late 17th century: alteration of rabbet.

Pronunciation

rebate

/ˈriːbeɪt/