Definition of reassurance in English:

reassurance

noun

mass noun
  • 1The action of removing someone's doubts or fears.

    ‘children need reassurance and praise’
    • ‘The arrival of police community support officers and community wardens can help give the public reassurance.’
    • ‘For these children, the parent seemed to be both a source of fear and of reassurance.’
    • ‘Lisa is aware of his constant presence, bringing reassurance and comfort.’
    • ‘Enthusiastic patient contact, reassurance, and long term support are important.’
    • ‘She has had trouble with her back and was tearful with relief after the comforting reassurance meted out by her principal and tutors.’
    • ‘As a result, they feel they need relief and reassurance more than ever.’
    • ‘Perhaps it was for his own consolation - like pinching oneself in reassurance.’
    • ‘Through it all, a coach provides a steady stream of encouragement and reassurance.’
    • ‘Support and reassurance that growing pains will pass as children grow up can help them relax.’
    • ‘To pre-empt that process by false praise or empty reassurance is not to further the growth of the individual but to cripple it.’
    • ‘Underneath you both want reassurance, but fear you'll be rejected.’
    • ‘But the main need for our frail elderly brothers and sisters in Christ is fellowship and reassurance in the gospel.’
    • ‘Along with the spinach pancakes I also enjoyed some comfort and reassurance.’
    • ‘They are given support and reassurance during their stay but, once they return home, they are on their own.’
    • ‘There is often little creative scope, frustration is common, and regular praise and reassurance are essential.’
    • ‘If only my mother had known about such simple measures as adjusting the feeding position and soothing reassurance.’
    • ‘I had interviewed her and noted she was nervous and wanted reassurance and comfort.’
    • ‘I know that many people find a great deal of comfort and reassurance from their faith and I'm happy for them.’
    • ‘My children gain comfort and reassurance from me in exactly that tableau.’
    • ‘Women who have experienced such loss require considerable reassurance and support in a subsequent pregnancy.’
    comfort, solace
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1count noun A statement that removes someone's doubts or fears.
      ‘we have been given reassurances that the water is safe to drink’
      • ‘Despite constant reassurances to the director on the proposed sale, commercial negotiations have yet to be completed by the company.’
      • ‘Notice that his reassurances about her doubts initially take the form of a warning about the dangers of narrative.’
      • ‘Instead, they have been issued only general reassurances that private companies will make allowances for them.’
      • ‘York MP Hugh Bayley is now demanding reassurances from the health trusts into which his Government pumped thousands of extra pounds.’
      • ‘They aren't the only ones who want answers or reassurances that such a power outage won't happen again.’
      • ‘He had to pay for a wheel clamp to be removed in early April and despite reassurances has still not seen a penny of his £95 back.’
      • ‘Festival organizers seem to have keyed into the public anxiety over their use of the park and are offering plenty of reassurances.’
      • ‘And councillors are demanding reassurances that correct procedures were followed.’
      • ‘The Europhile former chancellor wanted reassurances about the direction Mr Howard intends to take the party.’
      • ‘Plato listened intently, offering reassurances every step of the way.’
      • ‘The diplomats will be on hand to offer their condolences and reassurances to the grief-stricken nurses.’
      • ‘There are no reassurances, but I understand fully what the member and Mr Donnelly are talking about, and we do not have a problem.’
      • ‘This negative response occurs despite reassurances that it will take a short time to complete.’
      • ‘Police have offered reassurances to the public after a registered sex offender was sent to prison for nearly ten years after re-offending.’
      • ‘The Selby and York Primary Care Trust, which will administer the new service, offers its reassurances that the good work will continue.’
      • ‘So, as you would expect, the golfers wanted reassurances, guarantees and prompt answers to any questions they might have.’
      • ‘The scream, and the voices that answered with soothing reassurances, came from down the hall.’
      • ‘The agreement has yet to be finalised, and Kent councillors are understood to be seeking reassurances about their end of the deal before they sign on the dotted line.’
      • ‘Unfortunately, I doubt whether such reassurances will silence the critics.’
      • ‘Institutional investors are understood to be seeking reassurances that companies will take on board their concerns.’

Pronunciation

reassurance

/riːəˈʃʊərəns/