Definition of rearm in English:

rearm

verb

[with object]
  • 1Provide with a new supply of weapons.

    ‘his plan to rearm Germany’
    • ‘The torpedo planes that had been rearmed were brought up to the flight decks, beginning around 0920, but at least a third remained in the hangar decks at 1000.’
    • ‘She gathered up her coat, already mentally rearming herself.’
    • ‘Refueling and rearming them was an easy process.’
    • ‘French and German opposition to the war has translated into an initiative to rearm Europe.’
    • ‘Within minutes, the soldiers had rearmed themselves with weapons and ammunition.’
    • ‘More generally it showed what considerable efforts the Third Republic had made towards rearming France in the late 1930s.’
    • ‘After the Civil War, small-arms technology evolved rapidly, but a penurious Congress and an intractable ordnance board balked at rearming an entire army.’
    • ‘Despite initial reservations, they also played a major part in devising a satisfactory structure within which West Germany could be rearmed, and included in NATO in 1955.’
    • ‘After ready rounds are fired, crewman will need to rearm the launcher.’
    • ‘This unit is subject to attack and has a certain round trip time, so rearming units in the middle of combat at a distant front line can be a dicey proposition.’
    • ‘Dos Santos also repeated his accusation that Savimbi had used previous peace accords to buy time while he rearmed his troops.’
    • ‘Some of the most strident support for amending Article 9 and rearming Japan is to be found in Washington, rather than Tokyo.’
    • ‘The holocaust and Hitler could have been prevented if the allies had stopped Hitler from rearming Germany.’
    • ‘As noted, although the Army would want to retain heavy elements well into the future, there would eventually be a need to rearm the heavy forces with a follow-on vehicle.’
    • ‘American officers watched the Fascists consolidate their rule in Italy, Hitler rearm Germany, and Japan begin its march of conquest in Asia.’
    • ‘This is clear from the measures undertaken to rearm the German military - measures supported by all the parties.’
    • ‘The RF Armed Forces and other troops should be fully rearmed by 2020-2025.’
    • ‘Widespread fears loomed about the efficacy of the young democracy and the dangers of rearming a recently created German state.’
    • ‘British troops entered Greece in 1944, after the Resistance had liberated the country, only to rearm the fascist militias the Germans had created in order to turn them on the Resistance!’
    1. 1.1no object Acquire or build up a new supply of weapons.
      ‘sanctions to prevent the regime from rearming’
      • ‘But it gave Britain a valuable year in which to rearm.’
      • ‘After the German victories of 1940, America slowly began to rearm and to supply assistance to Britain.’
      • ‘He also questions why the South Koreans and Americans gave the enemy safe areas to rearm and regroup.’
      • ‘In the end, argues Doerr, it gave Britain the much needed time to rearm and prepare for war.’
      • ‘In 1938-9 Britain and France rearmed energetically and began to face the serious prospect of war with Germany if Hitler could not be deterred.’
      • ‘I think some of those troops that are withdrawing are actually going to rearm and refit themselves and then perhaps go back into the area to finish the job.’
      • ‘Supposing that I had gone to the country and said that Germany was rearming and that we must be armed, does anyone think that our pacific democracy would have rallied to that cry?’
      • ‘Six minutes later, a flight of helicopters that were participating in another operation arrived to be rearmed and refueled.’
      • ‘The political stalemate was broken; there was near unanimity that the USA must rearm immediately.’
      • ‘In recent months, there has been speculation that the two groups have established ties and that one goes on the offensive when the other negotiates, essentially to rest and rearm.’
      • ‘But one of the islands was just large enough for an airfield and a small harbor, where submarines could rearm and refuel.’
      • ‘To avoid another war, the Security Council quickly set up weapons inspections to prevent Baghdad from rearming.’
      • ‘Hence even if disarmament were achieved, conflicts would eventually provoke rearming.’
      • ‘As if these and other excesses were not enough, the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931 increased the pressure to rearm severalfold, as the plan's previous targets were raised to new heights.’
      • ‘It did not, and its failure to do so was to be used by the Germans when they denounced those restrictions and began rearming fifteen years later.’
      • ‘That means they'll rearm and they may very well develop weapons of mass destruction, just as a deterrent.’
      • ‘Their rivals generally refuse to relinquish their weapons, fearing that in a pinch the government will rearm or fight on behalf of their enemy.’
      • ‘But most abhor rearming with nuclear weapons, which is very unpopular with the general public.’
      • ‘This was music to McClellan's ears, because it meant that the fighters would be using dummy weapons and would thus need to rearm at the tugs in order to combat his fleet.’
      • ‘During the relative peace following the Korean conflict, America rearmed for the Cold War.’

Pronunciation

rearm

/riːˈɑːm/