Definition of reanimate in English:

reanimate

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Restore to life or consciousness; revive:

    ‘in the vain hope of being reanimated he left his body to science’
    • ‘They forge them, or steal them or plant false records or reanimate the dead, their papers anyway.’
    • ‘For you see, Rosalie has psychic powers and the ability to reanimate the dead.’
    • ‘Of interest I also like to stretch the subgenre of zombies to cover films containing characters that are reanimated corpses.’
    • ‘His solution was a sequel that would see the monster reanimated by an evil scientist.’
    • ‘My vision was blurry for a few moments and it was like I was trying to reanimate my body which for a few moments was also out.’
    • ‘Scientists have created eerie zombie dogs, reanimating the canines after several hours of clinical death in attempts to develop suspended animation for humans.’
    • ‘In between lies a fascinating, disturbing account of life in early 19th century Europe, the stage across which the obsessive Frankenstein wanders in search of knowledge that will allow him to reanimate the dead.’
    • ‘Never underestimate the metaphorical power of reanimated corpses.’
    • ‘Of course, we'll miss this character in any sequels, but there's a suggestion that the wizard might be able to reanimate him using the sacred stones.’
    • ‘Death and its hideous aftermath can come at the hands and blackened teeth of reanimated corpses or the deranged, power hungry gun muzzle of a fellow survivor.’
    • ‘On this reading, the disciples at Emmaus did not meet a physically reanimated Jesus of Nazareth, but discovered that the simple things Jesus had taught them remained active and sustaining in their lives despite his brutal execution.’
    • ‘First, these characters are not placid creatures risen by voodoo for slave labour but the dead, reanimated by a virus, whose single instinct is to eat human flesh.’
    • ‘My client says they had both drunk too much, and afterwards he tried to reanimate the earl with mouth-to-moth resuscitation and a cardiac massage.’
    • ‘It did not pain me instead it revived, reanimated and retrieved me.’
    • ‘They are zombies, butchered by overwork, and reanimated by the workshop staff, I bet, who are probably themselves controlled by some Terrible Black Magic Force!’
    • ‘It's no accident that it takes its structure from a film whose director was brought in to direct a single sequence in which a dead man is reanimated.’
    • ‘The Doc, our resident inventor, e-mails to say that his heart experiments are not going well, he has tried everything from a car ignition to 10,000 volts to reanimate an inert organ, but it is not responding.’
    • ‘The poem depicts the workings of an imminent deity that has the power to reanimate himself in every ‘face’ and take on the form of any human being, even the ‘dark skins His Father wrought.’’
    • ‘Madeline was a lush and a wine snob, a vegetarian, and a dreadful cook (once she had poached a thick hunk of cod to just that degree of lukewarmness that had reanimated the little white worms inside).’
    • ‘It isn't an airborne virus that's reanimating the corpses.’
    revive, revitalize, renew, regenerate, restore, breathe new life into, make someone feel young again, revivify, reanimate, resuscitate, refresh, reawaken, rekindle, put new life into, put new heart into, add some zest to, put some spark into, kick-start, uplift
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Give fresh vigour or impetus to:
      ‘his personal dislike of the man was reanimated’
      • ‘Mozart had obtained by force the words that suited him; his music reanimated the mystery of the mythic theme with a prodigious power of invention.’
      • ‘Eisner has expressed interest in reanimating Disney's classic 2 - D features in 3 - D.’
      • ‘Before we can even be in a position to make such a choice the democratic model of self-defense will have to be reanimated.’
      • ‘Ports, harbours and dockyards reanimated the scams of Pepys's day.’
      • ‘The ability of that medium to distort, graft, reopen and reanimate lost time permits these poems their exquisite, darkly funny dissections.’
      • ‘Alongside the need for patriotic resistance, the preoccupations of contemporary politics are calculated to reanimate Tory instincts.’
      • ‘Through text she reanimates the dreams of her concierge, a widow obsessed with the memory of her dead husband, though her husband remains dead.’
      • ‘Only a free market would restore abundance, not to mention reanimating foreign trade, which had languished under a controlled economy.’
      • ‘Whether he is writing about the Renaissance necromancer John Dee or the religious visions of Thomas More, Ackroyd energetically reanimates his historical personages, and insists their spectres are still tangible here and now.’
      • ‘Ulmer reanimates the now ossified mantra that ‘the personal is political’ by providing it with a methodology.’
      • ‘But he is indeed, as the title suggests, ‘bound to fail’ for in reanimating these moments he empowers both his foes.’
      • ‘So we decided to put it all back together - to reconnect and restore our wounded world until it was reanimated and resilient again.’
      • ‘He describes the essay as an ‘eye-opener’ capable of reanimating the inherited rhetorical tradition of the Greeks and Romans.’
      • ‘Anyway, in the first keynote political speech of the year, she's reanimated the old bogeyman argument that earth's oil supply is about to run out.’
      • ‘A wielding of language that speaks as a means to recapture and reanimate male power, it suggests a masculinity reasserting itself at the expense of women.’
      • ‘You can't get two Democrats together these days without a debate breaking out over what needs to be done to rescue, resuscitate, reanimate, remake, rebrand and redeem the Democratic Party.’
      • ‘Broaden or reanimate the repertoire, one argument runs, and you will broaden and reanimate the box office too.’

Pronunciation:

reanimate

/riːˈanɪmeɪt/