Main definitions of ream in English

: ream1ream2ream3

ream1

noun

  • 1500 (formerly 480) sheets of paper.

    • ‘A block of stamps the size of a ream of A4 paper would be worth a quarter of a million pounds - and you could just put it under your arm and walk away.’
    • ‘About 380,000 reams of paper were used for printing the rolls.’
    • ‘If I glance over to my bag on the floor there's a shape about the thickness of two reams of paper in it.’
    • ‘With two reams, he wouldn't have to worry about running out in the middle of a good part and having to get up to run to the store.’
    • ‘In fact, I think the ream of paper sitting next to my printer is actually the same package I bought when I got to New York.’
    • ‘I confess I reverted to form and consumed nearly a ream of paper printing out the contents of the Websites I visited.’
    • ‘Intent on getting 10,000 bills of paper, I visited my local stationers and bought six 500-sheet reams of paper.’
    • ‘Oskar has convinced Bruno to buy him a ream of blank white paper (Oskar terms it ‘virgin’ paper) so that he can write out his autobiography.’
    • ‘African colleagues are amused at the way I carry a ream of paper on my head.’
    • ‘The duty cycle is up to 850,000 pages a month, which is 1,700 reams of paper.’
    • ‘I bought a ream of paper and kept it close at hand.’
    • ‘‘We go through countless reams of paper,’ he said.’
    • ‘Mr Arthur told the paper that he had used 20 reams of typing paper in compiling the guide.’
    • ‘This printer has just about everything you're looking for in a package only slightly larger than a ream of paper.’
    • ‘I ran over several unlabeled reams but they turned out to be low quality Xerox paper inadequate for the report.’
    • ‘The demand for ream after ream of white paper is putting a huge strain not only on America's forests, but the world's.’
    • ‘Diving in Spain was hampered in the past by a police state that wanted a ream of paperwork before you were allowed to do anything.’
    • ‘But these were simply photocopies made on paper purchased in cheap reams.’
    • ‘I bought a ream of paper and a glue stick for photocopying my zine.’
    • ‘Besides the main entrance to the room, there was another door, which now opened, and a clerk came out, clutching a ream of paper and his writing instruments.’
    1. 1.1usually reams A large quantity of something, especially paper or writing.
      ‘reams of paper have been used to debate these questions’
      • ‘From nature to human tragedies, the photographs tell tales reams of paper cannot.’
      • ‘I wrote reams of poetry in my sixth form days, as a lot of people do.’
      • ‘Because the boundary between work and life tends to be fuzzy anyway, it's easy to bring home some envelopes, a few stamps, and a ream of paper in case a ministry-related letter needs to go out quickly.’
      • ‘They're going to be holding reams of paper with every word I've ever written here printed out on them and they are going to accuse me of being a traitor and a terrorist.’
      • ‘There are reams of research papers devoted to it.’
      • ‘Operations can also be reviewed at any time ‘without having to go through reams of paper, ‘she adds.’’
      • ‘I spent the days, and some of the nights, of that summer feverishly filling reams of paper with formulas.’
      • ‘She took out her violin case and the ream of papers that was to be her and Brian's performance for John Cawthorne's little concert.’
      • ‘Just as perplexing have been the mounting reams of academic papers examining her life and thought.’
      • ‘At first we were recycling reams and reams of paper but that has gone down as we are using less and using both sides.’
      • ‘The case contains reams of papers, including cuttings from England, Norway, Finland and Germany dating from 1936 to 1975.’
      • ‘We have handed over petitions - reams and reams of paper - and where has it got us?’
      • ‘His desk, by contrast, had very few papers on it and some intuition told me that the slim ream of papers gathered orderly into a coherent pile meant something.’
      • ‘This includes a handy option for printing multiple document pages on a single sheet of paper, so you can preview your finished results in miniature without wasting reams of paper.’
      • ‘English historians, for instance, have used the reams of paper generated by the courts that dealt with serious crimes.’
      • ‘For months I worked nonstop grinding out the detailed specification for the system - a monumental ream of paper going into incredible detail covering a gigantic object model and programming environment.’
      • ‘Meeting planners promise that all these new devices will liberate conference-goers from their social insecurities and the reams of paper that can attach themselves to attendees.’
      • ‘But he also wrote reams of unpublished serious music.’
      • ‘This necessitated that each campaigner maintain a ream of petitions, a separate sheet for each locality in the area.’
      • ‘It was a gripping photo that told the world more about the horrors of war than hours of talk or reams of paper ever could.’
      a large amount, a fair amount, a good deal, a great deal, a deal, a great quantity, quantities, an abundance, a wealth, a profusion, plenty, masses
      View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French raime, based on Arabic rizma ‘bundle’.

Pronunciation

ream

/riːm/

Main definitions of ream in English

: ream1ream2ream3

ream2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Widen (a hole) with a special tool.

    ‘a fan which has a small enough hole to be reamed out to the correct size’
    • ‘Wilson drills and reams a hole that will form the beginning of the bolt channel.’
    • ‘A further development was to use a brace and bit to ream out (as bone dust) burr holes about 1 cm in diameter.’
    • ‘At this stage, you've reamed the primer pocket and the flash hole.’
    • ‘Put the bar in place, give it a good whack with a hammer to mark the spot, and ream out a large enough hole so that the bar fits flush with the ceiling.’
    • ‘If step 4 does not work, you need to go to a machine shop and get the post reamed out of the seat tube.’
    • ‘If the only drill is too small, use a small screwdriver, knife, or round file to ream out the hole until the fastener will slide in snugly.’
    • ‘Once cooled, the outer clay is chipped away and the carbonized core reamed out, with the casting filed and chased.’
    1. 1.1 Widen a bore or hole in (a gun or other metal object) with a special tool.
      ‘the rods were marked out, drilled, and reamed’
      • ‘Each of the six machines are capable of performing all of the necessary machining processes on each knuckle including milling, drilling, reaming and cutting all ball joint angles and tapers.’
      • ‘The only thing a framebuilder could do is build up some brass inside the end of the head tube and ream it out to the proper size.’
      • ‘The frame and barrel are a single casting, which allows for easy manufacturing, but poses challenges to drilling, reaming and rifling.’
      • ‘It can also be used in drilling, end milling and reaming applications.’
      • ‘After gun drilling, the rough bore must be reamed to establish the desired internal diameter and to improve surface finish.’
      • ‘Pete wanted something a little more elaborate and chose a custom rifle reamed to 7x57.’
      • ‘The first honest to goodness minute-of-angle sporting rifle I ever owned was reamed to .300.’
      • ‘The .38 Super cartridge is larger in diameter than the .38 Special, so the first efforts involved reaming out the chamber area and making a sleeve that was silver soldered in place.’
      • ‘The original chamber was simply reamed out about 0.10’ oversize and a steel sleeve silver soldered in place.’
      • ‘The remaining piece was then reamed out and a straight piece of barrel blank turned to fit and soldered in place.’
    2. 1.2North American Clear out or remove (material) from something.
      ‘pierce, probe, and ream out the bony chambers of the crab's body’
      • ‘Sounding rods were used before antibiotics to ream out a gonorrhoea-mangled urethra.’
      • ‘He jumped up and reamed the glass shards out of the windowsill.’
      • ‘After you have cut the pipe, use the special blade on the tubing cutter to ream out the ‘burr ‘on the inside of the newly cut pipe.’’
      • ‘When we re-installed the outer wings, we reamed the taper hole to clean out the corrosion.’
      • ‘The dentist just completed an involved routine wherein one of my four favorite molars was reamed and repaired.’
      • ‘This rate is possible because reaming removes very little material.’
      • ‘The fluid jets clean the blades during the reaming operation and inject fluid into the formation to mix slurry and lubricate the equipment.’
      • ‘Ditching old equipment while making a tidy profit is classic Bell monopoly reaming.’
      • ‘The medullar canal was reamed, and an aluminum connecting piece was attached to the top of the tibia with screws and an epoxy resin.’
  • 2North American informal Rebuke (someone) fiercely.

    ‘the agent reamed him out for walking away from the deal’
    • ‘Against Syracuse, though, Cleaves had to ream Peterson at halftime for his reluctance to assert himself.’
    • ‘His wife would ream him good tonight when she found out he spent the afternoon at the track instead of the home improvement store.’
    • ‘Her mind reeled back an hour, to when she'd been standing in Rick's office as he reamed her a new one.’
    • ‘He kissed me softly before he left and I was about to ream him a new one before I saw Jason standing at the foot of the stairs.’
    • ‘I'm not saying Moore is above criticism either, I really reamed him out earlier this year when he endorsed Clark.’
    • ‘Too many times, we see a critic veer off the page to ream an author for the facts of his or her life.’
    • ‘Gloria entered Artie's office clutching her wounded arm, hoping it would buy her a little sympathy before he reamed her for her disappearance earlier that day.’
    • ‘She periodically gets up and goes into the next room and reams him out at top volume, while her obviously very fragile patient writhes on the couch.’
    • ‘Of course, things were supposed to go on as normal for the next few hours until she could really ream him out.’
    • ‘We didn't speak the entire way home and I just know he was about to explode and ream me a new one.’
    rebuke, reprimand, reproach, reprove, admonish, remonstrate with, chastise, chide, upbraid, take to task, pull up, castigate, lambaste, read someone the riot act, give someone a piece of one's mind, go on at, haul over the coals, criticize, censure
    View synonyms
  • 3North American vulgar slang Have anal intercourse with.

Phrases

  • ream someone's ass (or butt)

    • vulgar slang Criticize or rebuke someone.

Origin

Early 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

ream

/riːm/

Main definitions of ream in English

: ream1ream2ream3

ream3

verb

[NO OBJECT]Scottish, Northern Irish
  • Froth or overflow.

    ‘a full pot reaming with froth’
    • ‘A huge pewter measuring pot reamed with excellent claret.’
    • ‘It was washed down with a draught of Yule-ale that reamed briskly in a corner of the kitchen.’
    • ‘He is reaming over with brave, bright dreams of what he would like to do in this world.’
    • ‘His ladle ploutered in the reaming brew.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old English ream ‘cream’, of uncertain origin.

Pronunciation

ream

/riːm/