Definition of reader in English:

reader

noun

  • 1A person who reads or who is fond of reading:

    ‘she's an avid reader’
    • ‘Her approach and insight are so modern that they appeal to her younger readers too.’
    • ‘He was a voracious reader and fond of quoting philosophers.’
    • ‘If it is partly the aim of a literary festival to enthuse new, young readers, these two readings don't look like setting them on fire.’
    • ‘Born in Melbourne to socialist parents, he dropped out of education, despite being an avid reader and gifted writer.’
    • ‘I wouldn't exactly say that I am an avid reader of poetry, but I do read it, irregularly.’
    • ‘She was an avid reader, and read anything that she could get her hands on.’
    • ‘Let this be a lesson to my younger readers - listen to your teachers!’
    • ‘Newspapers are changing the way they look and the way they write to appeal to a younger generation of readers.’
    • ‘She stressed that the initiative was for everybody, from avid readers to those who find reading difficult and would like to improve their skills.’
    • ‘Though putting Portman on the cover certainly appeals to some younger readers, it's got nothing to do with music.’
    • ‘Working in a university I know that many of Larkin's most avid readers are students.’
    • ‘Quiet and serious, he was an avid reader whose choice of reading material revealed fundamentalist tendencies which made him easily fall prey to a terrorist cell.’
    • ‘It should also appeal to younger readers who seldom read Tamil books.’
    • ‘She claimed that Hamlet was an early favourite - its gory ending appealing to the young reader.’
    • ‘As I'm fond of reminding readers, your feelings don't have to change to get what you want.’
    • ‘The festival also offered the chance to talk with fellow readers and share reading recommendations.’
    • ‘As an avid reader, what's a book you've read recently?’
    • ‘Now, if you are not an avid reader, please scroll down 2 entries and read some.’
    • ‘She said the emphasis of the program was not on how many books are read in total by the young readers.’
    • ‘But it's all too scholarly for young readers, yet not academic enough for older fans.’
    educator, tutor, instructor, pedagogue, schoolteacher, schoolmaster, schoolmistress, master, mistress, governess, educationalist, educationist
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    1. 1.1 A person who reads a particular newspaper, magazine, or text:
      ‘Guardian readers’
      • ‘Following complaints from readers, the newspaper's faith in its columnist plummeted and he was sacked.’
      • ‘In its editorial on June 28, the newspaper explained to its readers its support for the candidates.’
      • ‘The median age of Astronomy magazine readers is rising by more than one year per year, and is now at least 52.6.’
      • ‘As regular readers of your newspaper, we are dismayed to read the authorities plans to ‘improve’ the resort.’
      • ‘Guns Magazine urges readers to obtain and read the full text of the document.’
      • ‘The social backgrounds of the editors, contributors, and readers of these newspapers were somewhat varied.’
      • ‘On that same day the morning newspaper told its readers that Beijing is meanwhile restoring its landmarks for the Olympics in 2008.’
      • ‘Most readers of this magazine have a biblical worldview and are inclined to accept your arguments.’
      • ‘The Sligo Weekender is a local newspaper of which its readers can be proud, and I'm sure that it re-launch will bring plenty more to the fold.’
      • ‘It lists the ‘100 Greatest Guitar Solos,’ according to a poll of the magazine's readers.’
      • ‘A Guild member echoed her comments and said that without the support of the newspaper and its readers there might not have been a new theatre.’
      • ‘The idea of any newspaper urging its readers to involve themselves in such a jaw droppingly patronising scheme is absurd.’
      • ‘I was horrified to read in your newspaper one of your readers was advised to move.’
      • ‘Newspapers are not succeeding in getting the children of the current older generation of readers to read newspapers.’
      • ‘From members of our citizens' panel to readers of our newspaper,. the message is loud and clear.’
      • ‘A few evenings ago he called me to ask me to convey to your newspaper and your readers his heartfelt thanks for your support of my campaign.’
      • ‘High-profile backers congratulated the newspaper and especially our readers for setting an example in positive action.’
      • ‘The top 10 tackiest couples of the year, according to readers of Star magazine, are as follows.’
      • ‘I am grateful to your newspaper and readers for their strong support for this vital new rail link for London.’
      • ‘Never mind, they say, it will be read avidly by our more gullible readers and boost the magazine's sales.’
      reader, regular reader, regular customer, follower, member, patron, supporter, backer, benefactor, sponsor, donor, contributor
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    2. 1.2 A person entitled to use a particular library.
      • ‘In this way a library's readers see the subscribed pages at their original location, even though the publisher may no longer provide them there.’
      • ‘This year, more such exhibitions, designed to take the library to the reader, may be held in schools and other institutions in the city.’
      • ‘It is not only that readers build up a library, but also that a library builds up its readers.’
      • ‘Mr Coates said libraries must treble their spending on books, increase opening hours and redecorate and redesign libraries to attract readers.’
      • ‘The release of the third movie means books in the series continue to spend more time with readers than on library shelves.’
      • ‘The festival will also include a readers' day for library staff, on May 14.’
      • ‘But now thanks to the generosity of readers the library is planning for the future and already buying new toys.’
      • ‘These lending libraries meet the requirement of readers which is not met by the conventional libraries.’
      • ‘Without the money raised by our readers, the library would have been forced to close next month.’
      • ‘A Burnley writer has won a national award from librarians and library readers for his best-selling series of crime novels.’
      • ‘Now library bosses have moved to reassure readers, saying the planning application is at an early stage.’
      • ‘Curious readers have started browsing libraries for anything that can enlighten them on the enigma.’
      • ‘This year, the AWIC is giving award to 30 children who have been regular readers in their respective libraries.’
      • ‘But I jotted down a number of references and educated myself on the odd weekend at the British Library, my old reader's card still being valid.’
      • ‘The columnist, a British Library reader, offered his wholehearted support to potential strikers.’
    3. 1.3 A person who reads and reports to a publisher or producer on the merits of manuscripts submitted for publication or production, or who provides critical comments on the text.
      • ‘Our FREE market update service `Readers Wanted', sent to you by e-mail monthly for twelve months.’
    4. 1.4 A proofreader.
    5. 1.5
      short for lay reader
      • ‘That says an awful lot about the attitude the church has towards its Readers, all of whom have undergone years of study and training before being licensed by the Bishop as are clergy.’
      • ‘It is too bad that we often put readers, ordained and lay, in costumes that shackle the creative reading of texts.’
      • ‘Deacons, subdeacons, and readers assist the priests during services.’
      • ‘Always involved in the preparation of Confirmation Classes she also tutored and ensured young readers were available for the masses.’
      • ‘TWO churchgoers from the Swindon area helped make history when they were licensed as Readers in the Church of England.’
      • ‘What is it really like training to be a Reader in the Church of England today?’
      • ‘Women now have the right to be ministers of the Eucharist and readers of the Word, but not priests.’
  • 2A person who inspects and records the figure indicated on a measuring instrument:

    ‘a meter reader’
    • ‘And you said no one ever recognizes you, that you're a meter reader.’
    • ‘Over the years, Gayla worked for the power company as a truck driver and a meter reader, while her husband, Dave, was a labor union representative.’
    • ‘Three days later she was found dead at her home by a visiting electricity meter reader.’
    • ‘Luksa eventually became a mess supervisor and later successfully applied for the job of meter reader in Adelaide.’
    • ‘50 years ago: Columnist John Blunt asked if readers' gas or electricity meter reader doffed his hat politely when he called.’
  • 3A book containing extracts of a text or texts, designed to give learners of a language practice in reading.

    • ‘For Grade 1, readers were selected as they are in many cases the first books that children encounter.’
    • ‘These include a Beginners' Reader with its own integrated work scheme.’
    • ‘We were frequently full as learners came in to work on their listening or speaking skills, or to practice for tests, or to borrow graded readers.’
    • ‘You can, however, fit a few dozen large textbooks into a book reader the size of one paperback-a boon for medical students, for instance.’
    • ‘Not the latest book in the early readers series, but another example of the mysterious culture of local television comedy.’
  • 4British A university lecturer of the highest grade below professor:

    ‘Dr Gardiner is Reader in Mathematics’
    • ‘He was a Visiting Fellow with the Centre for Development Studies at Thiruvanathapuram, before moving over to the Postgraduate Centre of the University of Madras in Tiruchi as a Reader in Economics.’
    • ‘Formerly a Reader in the Chemistry Department at the University of Dundee, he died suddenly in 1998 while. on holiday in Bavaria.’
    • ‘In March 2002 I was promoted to the position of Reader in the Faculty of Music.’
  • 5A device that produces on a screen a magnified, readable image of a microfiche or microfilm.

    • ‘A MICROFILM reader will be installed in Darwen Library in memory of Darwen headteacher Howard Peters, who died in July 2002.’
    • ‘Two reading rooms are included, with seating for up to 50 people, 20 microfilm readers, and a study suite for groups.’
    • ‘Even on a miserable late summer afternoon it is humming - quite literally, because of its bank of microfiche readers which are all occupied.’
    • ‘In the recorder's office, members of the public were studying computer screens and microfiche readers.’
    • ‘The magic lantern and the cinema spawned the microfilm reader.’
    • ‘She spent weeks hunkered under a microfilm reader, poring over six months of newspapers.’
    1. 5.1Computing A device or piece of software used for reading or obtaining data stored on tape, cards, or other media.
      • ‘Cardholders will simply swipe their card through a reader to gain access to the relevant forms of transport.’
      • ‘The color intensity was measured with a microtiter plate reader.’
      • ‘When he gets to his desk he inserts the same card into the reader in his computer and enters his personal password.’
      • ‘The ID reader and magnetic lock had yet to be installed there.’
      • ‘The reader generates an image of the inserted finger and compares it against a pre-programmed memory of authorized prints.’
      • ‘This can be done with one set of instruments and one instrument reader or, as suggested above, with two instrument readers using two sets of instruments.’
      • ‘XML also makes it possible to share those documents outside the organisation by incorporating all the extra information reader software needs to display or print the document.’
      • ‘A mobile phone or PDA with a bar-code reader would simply scan the object's code to download any relevant information.’
      • ‘However, what is not clear from the announcement is the interaction between the card and the reader.’
      • ‘The infrastructure is all there to do that: software on the reader and a communications system between the readers and some central point.’
      • ‘It also makes hard disk readers, importing the sliders on wafers from San Jose.’
      • ‘The absorbance was measured with a microtiter plate reader at a test wavelength of 405 nm.’
      • ‘All but one were mostly Republican, and each one used paper ballots and optical-scan readers.’
      • ‘The cameras and magnetic strip readers were stuck to the ATMs and looked like original parts.’
      • ‘It didn't recognize my digital camera's memory card when I plugged a reader in to a USB port.’
      • ‘Some even include biometric security measures such as fingerprint readers.’
      • ‘The Home Office pitch is that the presence of your card in a reader is, effectively, your permission that your ID be checked.’
      • ‘A system consists of an input or reader device, stored biometric data on known users and software that performs matches.’
      • ‘Such results were totally dependent on robotics, sophisticated image readers and computer power.’
      • ‘A police officer urged shop managers to check any suspicious notes using forge pens or machine readers that can help detect counterfeits.’

Origin

Old English rǣdere ‘interpreter of dreams, reader’.

Pronunciation

reader

/ˈriːdə/