Main definitions of rave in English

: rave1rave2

rave1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Talk incoherently, as if one were delirious or mad:

    ‘Nancy's having hysterics and raving about a black ghost’
    • ‘Her eyes were still fixed on Mr. Stevens who was babbling and raving in some type of speech Alexander had never heard before.’
    • ‘The Pythia would rave and babble incoherently.’
    • ‘Your cackles filling the room, you just sat there laughing and raving like a lunatic.’
    • ‘When he succeeded in waking us up, we had been completely incoherent, raving about caves and pigeons and dark unspeakable evil.’
    • ‘Daron was off his nut all night, ranting and raving with little coherency.’
    • ‘Frankenstein lapsed into a delirious fever for several months, ranting and raving about killing the monster.’
    • ‘The Prime Minister raved incoherently: ‘I see myself as the big fat spider in the corner of the room.’’
    • ‘He began to rave again, bellowing incoherencies and profanities at the top of his lungs.’
    • ‘And good old Prince is still raving about freedom and spirituality, God bless him.’
    • ‘Damn it I must seem like I'm raving like a lunatic about the red menace.’
    talk wildly, babble, jabber, ramble, maunder
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Address someone in an angry, uncontrolled way:
      [with direct speech] ‘‘Never mind how he feels!’ Melissa raved’
      • ‘In between ranting and raving I watch football.’
      • ‘There's no point ranting and raving or going crying to the manager.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, Bush ranted and raved like an angry lunatic throughout the second debate.’
      • ‘Performers with problems will be ranting and raving about them at the next Coco Café - even more than usual.’
      • ‘Jock blew his top, he went absolutely ballistic, ranting and raving.’
      • ‘He was then standing in the street ranting and raving and my dad asked him to move out the way, and the guy said he would be back.’
      • ‘His performance is deeply moving, but also crackles with his trademark ranting and raving.’
      • ‘A couple who left behind me were still raving about him when we reached the car park.’
      • ‘Mr Welling said: ‘The defendant telephoned her and he was abusive, ranting and raving.’’
      • ‘She was ranting and raving and stamping her feet like a child.’
      • ‘This is a cellphone message left by the guy where he starts ranting and raving.’
      • ‘But I got into work today to find a certain colleague ranting and raving about it.’
      • ‘People were saying he'd come in and be ranting and raving, but he's not like that.’
      • ‘Why are people ranting and raving over the costs of their hydro bills while going out and leaving all the lights on?’
      • ‘As any manager of a boys' team will tell you, ranting and raving on the touchline is of limited motivational value.’
      • ‘Sure, the lyrics are angry, bitter, raving, mad, obscene, and a 1000 other adjectives, but they don't change my opinion.’
      • ‘Stop the media's ranting and raving about 6,000 or even 7,000 dead, many of whom never died at all.’
      • ‘Ann Coulter doesn't go on television ranting and raving like the liberals do.’
      • ‘Smith then started ranting and raving and making insulting remarks about Mrs Pickup's son.’
      • ‘So, we would fight all the way to church, ranting and raving, screaming and yelling.’
      rant, rant and rave, rage, explode in anger, lose one's temper, be beside oneself, storm, fulminate, deliver a harangue, deliver a tirade, go into a frenzy, lose control
      View synonyms
  • 2Speak or write about someone or something with great enthusiasm or admiration:

    ‘New York's critics raved about the acting’
    • ‘Their daughter Jill lives here with her husband Neil and was always raving about the place.’
    • ‘Many critics raved about the bust but others found it ghoulish and disgusting.’
    • ‘Critics, TV executives and its devoted audience raved about the show, making it seem more influential in Britain than perhaps it really was.’
    • ‘A close-up on the 56-year old Magande reveals much more than what some armchair critics and sceptics may be raving about.’
    • ‘With fans and reviewers raving, why is he so terrified by every new role?’
    • ‘What's more, it's not just the audiences who love the show - critics have found plenty to rave about too.’
    • ‘I ordered the Quattro panini as did Molly and Patty and we all raved.’
    • ‘Salthouse had the critics raving about their last album ‘Dream by Day’.’
    • ‘Dayne showed off the quick feet scouts have been raving about since he was drafted.’
    • ‘Coaches rave about Miller's hands, as he excels at getting open over the middle.’
    • ‘Scouts rave about your raw power, but you've also piled up a lot of strikeouts.’
    • ‘Scouts rave about the Cubs' abundance of young pitching - and with good reason.’
    • ‘"My eyes looked more radiant instantly, " raved one tester.’
    • ‘I have purchased several copies for songwriting friends and they have all raved about it.’
    • ‘After a few years, I yielded to the pressure of fellow critics who couldn't understand why I wasn't raving about the film.’
    • ‘Sure, they got awards, but critics were also raving over junk.’
    • ‘Critics are already raving about the new Channel Four programme ‘Shameless’, which hits the screen tonight.’
    • ‘I wish I could rave as enthusiastically about the audio department.’
    • ‘Players and coaches raved about what a wonderful place it was to work.’
    • ‘That said, nearly all the guests I spoke to raved about their excursions, claiming they were the highlight of their holiday.’
    praise enthusiastically, go into raptures about, go into raptures over, wax lyrical about, sing the praises of, praise to the skies, heap praise on, rhapsodize over, enthuse about, enthuse over, gush about, gush over, throw bouquets at, express delight over, acclaim, eulogize, extol
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  • 3informal Attend a rave party:

    ‘they used to rave together—then they started working together’
    • ‘Viewers watch aliens rave at a dance party, float off into space while fireworks explode, and witness a fiery kaleidoscope descending from overhead.’
    • ‘We remember one party near Jerusalem, thousands of people were raving like hell inside an ancient cave.’
    • ‘Beat it out and we pulse together, it's a wonder we don't rave daily.’

noun

informal
  • 1[usually as modifier] An extremely enthusiastic recommendation or appraisal:

    ‘their tour received rave reviews’
    • ‘And though his realistic and hard-hitting film has won some rave reviews, Tigmanshu is certainly not resting on his laurels.’
    • ‘Dickerson's quickness is drawing raves from opposing coaches and players.’
    • ‘Her physique drew raves from the audience, which included a strong following for her.’
    • ‘Accordingly, it received rave reviews and a loyal following among the press corps.’
    • ‘Peppers drew raves from everywhere because of his combination of speed and strength.’
    • ‘Liam Neeson stars in " Kinsey " which opens in Ireland to rave reviews.’
    • ‘His foam/mesh trucker hat even drew raves from adoring female fans.’
    • ‘All the rave reviews in the world couldn't turn Pavement into pop stars - maybe it's because they couldn't dance.’
    • ‘One of its new PCs with easy-to-use Internet telephone service has won raves from reviewers.’
    • ‘He read it on the plane, and in London saw the rave reviews that the media was giving to the book.’
    • ‘I know this film received rave reviews when it was reissued a couple of years ago.’
    • ‘The film is receiving rave reviews for its blunt honesty and nutty characters.’
    • ‘Despite the occasional bug, Google's new Gmail feature is drawing raves.’
    • ‘The Merchant of Venice opened at the American Theater on May 24, 1903, and rave notices showered down.’
    • ‘Performing at the Cotton Club, the girls won rave reviews from critics.’
    • ‘Both Jodi's album and her live shows have been winning her rave reviews.’
    • ‘Perhaps it was significant that the rave reviews on the back cover were all written by women.’
    • ‘Ever since its release in the US, the film has been getting rave reviews from several quarters in Hollywood.’
    • ‘On April 23, Richard Lair conducted an orchestra of 12 elephants to rave reviews.’
    • ‘It is listed on the Australian and US stock markets and has won rave reviews for its financial performances.’
    enthusiastic praise, lavish praise, a rapturous reception, tribute, plaudits, encomiums, bouquets
    very enthusiastic, rapturous, glowing, ecstatic, full of praise, rhapsodic, laudatory, eulogistic, panegyrical, excellent, highly favourable
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person or thing that inspires intense and widely shared enthusiasm:
      ‘last year's fave raves are back for a live performance’
      • ‘Our fave rave vampire doesn't make an appearance until rather late in the game.’
    2. 1.2British dated A passionate and usually transitory infatuation:
      ‘they are like little girls of eleven—they have raves’
  • 2A lively party involving dancing and drinking:

    ‘their annual fancy-dress rave’
    1. 2.1 A very large party or similar event with dancing to loud, fast electronic music:
      [as modifier] ‘rave culture’
      • ‘Or should we be on the lookout for a spike in all-night raves up on the Hill?’
      • ‘In 1999 I went to my first underground garage rave.’
      • ‘But when Europe started winning in the 1980s, the party took on the intensity of a rave.’
      • ‘Police were called when more than 80 people attended a rave in woods in Bolton.’
      • ‘For a moment, the murk feels strangely comforting, like walking out of a rave into the balm of an urban winter smog.’
      • ‘We talk about the things that affect our communities, guns, raves, fashion, anything and everything.’
      • ‘I've been into raves and electronic music since the early '90s, and I can tell you that there is no other music scene that can boast this.’
      • ‘She grabbed his hand and led him into the elevator which takes them down to an underground rave.’
      • ‘He has even played a few warehouse raves with some of these luminaries.’
      • ‘In response the government passed the Criminal Justice Act of 1994, which outlawed these large outdoor raves.’
      • ‘Police and district councils have joined forces to crack down on irresponsible raves which can put people at risk and cause misery to neighbours.’
      • ‘There were more performance-enhancing drugs going down than at an all-night rave.’
      • ‘Everyone looks like they're on their way home from an all-night rave but without the grin.’
      • ‘"There are illegal dance raves out there, " he said.’
      • ‘The typical instinct of the public is to stereotype people who attend raves.’
      • ‘Finally, the vast majority of those who attend raves and dance clubs are existing drug users.’
      • ‘An outdoor summer party was scuppered by police, who believed it to be an illegal rave.’
      • ‘Teenagers started defiling the lands of their ancestors by holding ecstasy raves on sacred ground.’
      • ‘The streets were nearly dead, aside from the occasional drunk, the occasional illegal rave.’
      • ‘The music at this event had not been as loud as at previous raves.’
      warehouse party, acid house party
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2[mass noun] Electronic dance music of the kind played at a rave:
      ‘the album is an eleven-track journey through rave and techno’
      • ‘Don't get me started on why my music is better than rave music.’
      • ‘Music was up beat, perfect for dancing, mixing with techno, rave, electric and pop.’
      • ‘Plus the double-time rave during the sub-Jeff Beck guitar solo is a gas.’
      • ‘Caroline Hayeur is best known for her photographs of Montreal nightlife, rave and techno scenes.’
      • ‘Gone is Scud's uncompromising chunky beats and I-Sound's earlier nods toward rave's easy to discern breakbeats.’
      • ‘And the music: not guitars and plaintive harmonicas but the brain-deep electronic thud of rave.’
      • ‘Such it was for the thirtysomethings, born just too late for the anger of punk and too early for the full-blown hedonism of rave.’
      • ‘There seems to be a division in electro between artists who were influenced by '80s synthpop and new wave and those, like you, who came from rave and techno.’
      • ‘At the time records were becoming so aggressive, like with rave and hardcore breakbeat, and I wanted something warmer and softer.’
      • ‘People in the reggae, dance, rave, R&B scenes created drum 'n' bass jungle, with reggae at the heart of it.’
      • ‘On the tape, we see Mike attempting over the decades to exploit the worlds of psychedelia, disco and rave.’
      • ‘It's no secret that hardcore rave and hardcore punk have always been long-lost bastard brothers.’
      • ‘Disco would go back underground and sprout under a thousand aliases - house, techno, rave, rare groove, you name it.’
      • ‘Even Orbital were dodgy punks before they discovered rave.’
      • ‘The opening track ‘Ghetto Musick’ jumps from hardcore rave to sauna soul without pausing for breath, a curiously addictive juxtaposition.’
      • ‘The second CD takes us into self-described ‘acid, rave, electropop’ territory.’
      • ‘It's got techno, trance, rave, hip hop, and lots of other types of music in the different mixes.’
      • ‘So please calibrate this rave according to your own tolerance for artsy-fartsy pop, but don't go overboard.’
      • ‘Rather than defining genres, Skinner explores them, intersecting garage and hip-hop with rave, reggae, and even a twinge of bedsit indie.’
      • ‘I threw myself into the rave / techno end of things which seemed more liberating, less self-conscious, and that twisted its way towards electronica.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense ‘show signs of madness’): probably from Old Northern French raver; related obscurely to Middle Low German reven be senseless, rave.

Pronunciation:

rave

/reɪv/

Main definitions of rave in English

: rave1rave2

rave2

noun

  • 1A rail of a cart.

    1. 1.1raves A permanent or removable framework added to the sides of a cart to increase its capacity.

Origin

Mid 16th century: variant of the synonymous dialect word rathe, of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

rave

/reɪv/