Main definitions of rate in English

: rate1rate2rate3

rate1

noun

  • 1A measure, quantity, or frequency, typically one measured against another quantity or measure.

    ‘the island has the lowest crime rate in the world’
    ‘buying up sites at a rate of one a month’
    • ‘In the first quarter, the clubs have decreased their annualized attrition rate by 3 percent.’
    • ‘Detection rates for violent crime rose from just over 13,000 to more than 15,500.’
    • ‘Yet their crime rates, by whatever measure one judged them, were very different.’
    • ‘Relapse rates remain high, typically over 70 %.’
    • ‘Although the theoretical model assumes constant yaw rate, the measured rates are highly dynamic.’
    • ‘Across the country this year's pass rate soared to 96 per cent - the 22nd annual rise in a row.’
    • ‘Interest rates on credit cards tend to respond to moves in short-term interest rates, which means they are rising.’
    • ‘"Food prices played a prominent role in determining the overall inflation rate during the fourth quarter of 2002.’
    • ‘The rising unemployment rate has apparently caused the government to think twice about more active trade ties with China.’
    • ‘The policies should encourage economic growth since inflation rates remain low.’
    • ‘According to the United Nations, this Southern African nation has the world's highest rate of infection.’
    • ‘The mutation rate is measured as the number of nucleotide substitutions per site per generation.’
    • ‘Curvature is a measure of the local geometry of the surface, while the strain rates measure its relative rate of expansion.’
    • ‘Even as this nation's crime rate is falling, the prison population is rising.’
    • ‘Transplantation success rates vary depending on the cause of renal failure.’
    • ‘Most importantly, combinations of antioxidant vitamins appear slightly to increase overall mortality rates.’
    • ‘The nation's unemployment rate rose just 5.9 percent last month.’
    • ‘The overall mortality rate was lower in the daily dialysis group (28 versus 46 percent for conventional treatment).’
    • ‘The approximate increase in sampling size can be computed assuming constant rates of evolution.’
    • ‘Therefore, the results use percentile reporting rates instead of standard deviations.’
    • ‘However, intense male recombination hotspots should still increase average recombination rates.’
    1. 1.1 The speed with which something moves or happens.
      ‘the band is shedding vocalists at an alarming rate’
      ‘your heart rate’
      • ‘They try to judge their speed with its rate of descent, and mistakes happen.’
      • ‘Near the sun you would increase speed at the rate of 600 mph each second, but you would feel no force acting upon you.’
      • ‘Flooding significantly enhanced the rate of photosynthesis at all light levels in both populations.’
      • ‘Everyone has at some point noticed how people talk at drastically varying rates of speed.’
      • ‘But we are really moving at an incredible rate to get medicines to the hospitals.’
      • ‘But their career may not move at the same rate or in the same direction as they first intended.’
      • ‘Time is what measures the rate at which everything else changes.’
      • ‘As I headed back to my car, a white van passed me at an extraordinary rate of speed.’
      • ‘As the officer was about to go after the cars, three more vehicles rounded the curve at a similar rate of speed.’
      • ‘He added that the streets were not packed with people and the march did not move at a constant rate.’
      • ‘It is harder to attack a convoy, however, if it is moving at a high rate of speed.’
      • ‘One of the principal parameters is the clock speed, the processing rate of the main processor.’
      • ‘Furthermore, the epicycle does not move at a uniform rate with respect to the centre of the deferent or the Earth.’
      • ‘Oh who am I kidding, the thought of riding wasn't the only thing that was causing my heart rate to speed up.’
      • ‘The gates take a relatively long time to close, so if the person before you moves at a normal rate, you should be able to go in with him/her.’
      • ‘It measures the rate at which small disturbances explode exponentially in time.’
      • ‘To calculate your maximum heart rate, subtract your age from 220.’
      • ‘But police say it was traveling at a high rate of speed when the accident happened.’
      • ‘Because of the moderate rate of speed, the bicyclist also wants and needs many miles of trails.’
      • ‘The speed of silicon-based processors is limited by the rate at which electrons move round circuits.’
      speed, pace, tempo, velocity, momentum
      View synonyms
  • 2A fixed price paid or charged for something.

    ‘a £3.40 minimum hourly rate of pay’
    ‘advertising rates’
    • ‘Borrowers can choose from fixed or variable rates, with terms ranging from five to 30 years, with the longer time frame proving most popular.’
    • ‘However, mortgage lenders are still offering very tasty fixed and variable rates.’
    • ‘The analysis also fails to determine the degree to which many economic variables, such as hourly pay rates, are catching up on other parts of Europe.’
    • ‘According to Martin, daily technical trainer contract rates vary depending on individual areas of specialisation.’
    • ‘The average hourly rate of pay must not be less than your minimum hourly rate of pay illustrated on the table above.’
    • ‘Due to increased competition there is now a greater choice of mortgages available, including discounted variable rates and fixed rate deals.’
    • ‘The company offers air fares to Germany and Belgium, at rates equal to the prices of bus tickets.’
    • ‘The main reason for this move is that the rate of airport expenses of the Universal Postal Union has dropped.’
    • ‘In Mumbai and Pune, rickshaws have meters, and a fixed rate by which you pay them.’
    • ‘He said the £16,000 payment to his wife was for clerical work which had been paid at an hourly rate.’
    • ‘They pay WordPress a fixed rate for this service and then give them the content.’
    • ‘They also want overtime to be paid at time-and-a-half and double the hourly rate, with full pay for the first six months that miners are off sick.’
    • ‘Apartments are priced at three rates, depending on the rental guarantees attached.’
    • ‘For similar service and medications, they strive to set their rates similar to market prices.’
    • ‘At present all non-domestic users pay a fixed rate for water irrespective of the quantity that they use.’
    • ‘The rental rate includes all the fixed costs of operating a facility expressed on a square footage basis.’
    • ‘Variable rates mean you pay the going rate on your loan.’
    • ‘I was going to charge them an hourly rate with an estimate of how long I thought it was going to be.’
    • ‘China is not a natural candidate for a fixed exchange rate against the dollar.’
    • ‘Mr Hughes remained hopeful he may have been signalling a move to cut rates in the near term.’
    charge, price, cost, tariff, hire, fare, figure, amount, outlay
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 The amount of a charge or payment expressed as a percentage of another amount, or as a basis of calculation.
      ‘you'll find our current interest rate very competitive’
      • ‘Why linger with a lender's standard variable rate when you can borrow more cheaply with a bit of effort?’
      • ‘The interest accumulates on a daily basis and the rate is 11.75 per cent per annum.’
      • ‘"It is expected that commercial banks will respond by lowering their lending base rates, " he explained.’
      • ‘At the moment we think that highly taxed New Zealanders pay a marginal tax rate of 39 percent.’
      • ‘If America's central bank moves to increase rates sharply, it will derail the economy and stifle any increase in markets.’
      • ‘Repayments will increase dramatically if the rate moves towards 3%, as predicted.’
      • ‘If so, he also may be liable for state and local income taxes, which combined amount to a rate of 10.44 per cent.’
      • ‘A transfer of property between blood relatives is charged at half the rate of stamp duty which would otherwise apply.’
      • ‘If she gets pregnant, the interest rate drops by one basis point for one year.’
      • ‘And, in fact, since the early 1990s interest rates have fallen and loan maturities have lengthened on average.’
      • ‘But today's low interest rates have prevented some policies from earning enough to automatically pay those premiums.’
      • ‘Fifteen-year fixed mortgage rates rose 7 basis points to 5.47 %.’
      • ‘On exiting the scheme, tax is charged at a rate of 23 per cent on the interest earned.’
      • ‘If only one spouse is working, they can earn up to €37,000 before moving to the higher rate of tax.’
      • ‘However, very few if any endowment policies have matched the interest rate being charged on debt and bonds.’
      • ‘Discounted rates offer a permanent discount off the lender's variable rate.’
      • ‘Instead, the House voted to cut the maximum tax rates on both dividends and capital gains to 15 percent.’
      • ‘The actual average annual exchange rate in 1978 was US $0.877 / CA $1.00.’
      • ‘The Bank of England was ‘clearly ready to move’ on rates if necessary, said the governor, Sir Eddie George.’
      • ‘A person on $60,000 pays a marginal tax rate of 47 per cent on the next dollar they earn.’
      percentage, ratio, proportion, scale, standard
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2rates (in the UK) a tax on commercial land and buildings paid to a local authority; (in Northern Ireland and formerly in the UK) a tax levied on private property.
      • ‘Businesses often question what they get in return for paying local authority rates.’
      • ‘Local government did tax directly; its revenue came from rates collected on land.’
      • ‘Remember, it is our money, directly as taxes and rates or indirectly as rent, that pays for council services.’
      • ‘We council tax payers pay rates to Central Government, which later gives money to the council to pay for such expenses.’
      • ‘Local government gained its revenue from rates, a tax on land.’

verb

  • 1with object Assign a standard or value to (something) according to a particular scale.

    ‘they were asked to rate their ability at different driving manoeuvres’
    with object and complement ‘the hotel, rated four star, had no hot water’
    • ‘It's not exactly possible to rate abortion on a scale of one star to five, is it?’
    • ‘Each recommendation was rated according to the level of scientific information available to support the statement.’
    • ‘The on-loan Belgian had not trained since then and was rated highly doubtful for tonight.’
    • ‘Aidan O'Mahony sustained a thigh injury in the drawn encounter, and is rated doubtful.’
    • ‘I'd rate it four stars out of five. Lots of duelling in that movie - lots of new monsters.’
    • ‘But it was rated PG - 13 and faced no new competition.’
    • ‘The institute rates cars on a scale of poor, marginal, acceptable and good.’
    • ‘Colm Picked up an injury in training last Saturday and is rated very doubtful.’
    • ‘But the poor sovereign rating will make it much harder for the country to raise money.’
    • ‘Only 10 % of films rated PG or PG - 13 contained no smoking.’
    • ‘The president's high approval rating is rooted in patriotism, not a broad embrace of Bush's conservative policies.’
    • ‘Renault now has three out of the six cars so far to have achieved a top five-star rating.’
    • ‘Items were rated on a scale from zero to three.’
    • ‘What I meant was the story is rated PG - 13 for language.’
    • ‘The potential of lost work caused by viruses and other malicious software also rated very high.’
    • ‘A two-star rating means the hospital has performed well overall but has not achieved consistently high standards.’
    • ‘In July, its sovereign credit rating was downgraded.’
    • ‘Items are rated on a four-point scale with the anchors strongly agree and strongly disagree.’
    • ‘For the effect it had on my skin I would rate it four stars.’
    • ‘All items were rated on a scale ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree.’
    • ‘Until 1999, Star Wars films were rated on a scale of 10 to 10 with no exceptions.’
    • ‘I have rated them on a scale of zero to four stars.’
    • ‘They were also asked to describe their outfits on a 7-point Likert scale rating four options: natural, modest, bold, and sexy.’
    • ‘Social services in Kingston has retained its top three-star rating following an assessment by the commission for social care.’
    • ‘The four basic physiological components of fitness are rated on a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 being excellent.’
    • ‘Greek companies had the lowest overall average rating at 2.93 with Japan at 3.57.’
    • ‘Almost every one of the albums was rated four stars by customers.’
    • ‘They achieved a three-star rating for three successive years.’
    assess, evaluate, appraise, weigh up, judge, estimate, calculate, compute, gauge, measure, adjudge, value, put a value on
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with object and adverbial Assign a standard, optimal, or limiting rating to (a piece of equipment)
      ‘the average life of the new bulb is rated at approximately 500 hours’
      • ‘In stock form, the Ecotec is rated at 140 horsepower.’
      • ‘Compared to this, the Transmeta processor in the forthcoming machine from Sony is rated at 600MHz.’
      • ‘The Opteron is being rated at a thermal design power, or thermal tolerance, of 80 watts, according to sources.’
      • ‘The Holley Dominator four-barrel is rated at 1,050 cfm.’
      • ‘Two of the machines are rated at 56 hp, and two have 81 hp.’
      • ‘Four diesel engines type 12V595 TE90 from MTU are each rated at 4.2MW.’
      • ‘The transmission system is rated at 900 hp for improved high temperature and high altitude performance.’
      • ‘Although the TwinX Kit is rated at 400MHz, contrary to popular belief, the speed of the ram is not the single most important factor when shopping for ram.’
      • ‘The unit's battery is removable, and is rated at 1200mAh.’
      • ‘This type of heater typically is rated at 1500-watts.’
      • ‘The fan is slightly larger than nVidia's reference, and is rated at 10.6CFM.’
      • ‘The strongest flares on record, in 1989 and 2001, were rated at X20.’
      • ‘For example, my digital camera uses four nickel-cadmium batteries that are rated at 1.25 volts and 500 milliamp-hours for each cell.’
      • ‘Hansen's truck is powered by a Brent Voges-built 327-cid engine that is rated at 250 horsepower.’
      • ‘To prevent DVT, the stocking must be rated at least 15 mm Hg to 20 mm Hg compression.’
      • ‘Symmetrix DMX is rated at 64GBps of peak internal bandwidth, which is a huge leap over the Symmetrix 8000's 1.6GBps.’
      • ‘The engine is rated at 24 hp at 3400, which is more than sufficient.’
      • ‘The amount of electricity that gets through is also important so look for a product that is rated at least 300 joules - the higher the better.’
      • ‘The Sterling diesel engine was an 8 cylinder 8x9 engine operating at 1200 rpm and rated at 650 horsepower.’
      • ‘The two low magnetic field electric motors feature compensated stray fields and are each rated at 125kW for minehunting.’
    2. 1.2 (in the UK) assess the value of (a property) for the purpose of levying a local tax.
      • ‘The earlier Transvaal Ordinance effectively prevented flat rating or total value rating.’
      • ‘SOME AUSTRALIAN MUNICIPALITIES were rating on unimproved land values as early as the 1850s.’
      • ‘Auckland city is the last remaining instance of annual rental value rating - a relic from the nineteenth century.’
  • 2with object and adverbial Consider to be of a certain quality or standard.

    ‘Atkinson rates him as Europe's top defender’
    with object and complement ‘the program has been rated a great success’
    • ‘Having graduated from the university of life through his extensive travels, Martin, a self made man, must be rated among the most successful business people ever to come from the heather county.’
    • ‘I can't believe I'm rating this so highly, but my judgement is clouded by all the nights out where this got everyone dancing.’
    • ‘Yet another Pattern Festival has come and gone and this one has to be rated most successful.’
    • ‘Kingston has been rated the 27th worst borough in London for quality of life in a survey out this week.’
    • ‘Even business magazines in Brazil have rated Porto Alegre as the city with the highest quality of life.’
    • ‘Bents Green is rated as a highly successful school and during its last inspection it was found to have many strengths and no weaknesses.’
    • ‘At present, only office buildings can be rated, but a program for schools will be announced soon, and programs for retail and hospitality facilities are expected out by the end of the year.’
    • ‘So Target's experiment - which may have cost a million dollars - must be rated a resounding success.’
    • ‘Despite being rated by many good judges as good a lock as has played for Scotland over the past decade, Grimes' international career has run far from smoothly.’
    • ‘In a recent blind tasting, judges rated a #15 bottle of American Cabernet Sauvignon over a #250 bottle of 1993 Chteau Petrus.’
    • ‘Upstream of York and as it flowed through the city, the Ouse was rated to be of ‘very good’ biological quality last year.’
    • ‘How could WorldCom, a company that was in financial trouble, issue bonds that were rated investment grade quality?’
    • ‘Students from the two programs rated their own and their peers' experience of how gender education effects therapy, program culture, and personal life.’
    • ‘And out of the 10 specialist services provided at the hospital, such as paediatrics, stroke and heart treatments, eight are rated as being high quality.’
    • ‘The magazine's judges have rated Senna the best driver ever, followed by Fangio, Schumacher, Jim Clark and Alain Prost.’
    • ‘After all, he did win a nationwide poll to find whom the public rated our most honest politician, though I've always considered ‘honest politician’ something of an oxymoron.’
    • ‘The judges rated her only mediocre, but she placed third in her group in no small part due to Simon picking on her for her weight.’
    • ‘For example, in Malaysia and Korea, prospects do not rate themselves highly nor share past successes easily.’
    • ‘Even yours truly rated a fleeting mention so of course it must be rated a sterling success.’
    • ‘A recent indoor rugby union Test between Australia and South Africa was rated a success by the host union and stadium officials.’
    consider to be, judge to be, reckon to be, think to be, hold to be, deem to be, find to be
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1no object, with adverbial Be regarded in a specified way.
      ‘Jeff still rates as one of the nicest people I have ever met’
      • ‘Younis Khan, another young talent rated very highly in his country did his bit at one end.’
      • ‘Environmental quality rated considerably ahead of CEO preference - frequently alluded to as a key location factor for high tech companies.’
      • ‘So how do election counts rate in terms of viewer involvement?’
      • ‘A vegetable doesn't have to be high on all counts to be worth growing, especially if it rates better than the cultivar you have been putting in for years.’
      • ‘Mr Ahern said that Lissadell House is considered of national importance and is so rated in the national inventory of architectural heritage.’
      • ‘Elvis Presley came second, and Unchained Melody, by various artists, also rated highly.’
      • ‘Neither of us seems to be very sure just how safe blogs are as statements of personal opinion, whether they rate as a public diary or as a written statement of fact.’
      • ‘How the schools rated was a key consideration for Greg Turner when he began his full-time MBA at Manchester Business School last year.’
    2. 2.2informal with object Have a high opinion of.
      ‘Mike certainly rated her, goodness knows why’
      • ‘WHAT IS THE HUMAN QUALITY most rated by Californians?’
      think highly of, have a high opinion of, admire, think much of, set much store by, hold in esteem, esteem, value, hold in high regard
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3with object Be worthy of; merit.
      ‘the ambassador rated a bulletproof car and a police escort’
      • ‘Nine's ratings problems and management changes barely rated a mention around the market.’
      • ‘He barely rates a mention, naturally, and when he is mentioned he is sneered at.’
      • ‘By the benchmark of the Rwandan civil war, it would barely rate a mention.’
      merit, deserve, warrant, be worthy of, be worth, be entitled to, be deserving of, have a claim to, have a right to
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • at any rate

    • 1Whatever happens or may have happened.

      ‘for the moment, at any rate, he was safe’
      • ‘We know only that the transfer was made, at any rate, according to a public statement by Earl Huntley.’
      • ‘It is a refreshing change, at any rate, from the world of suited and booted gentry that dominates a channel like CNBC.’
      • ‘But at any rate, what taboos will cinema breach after the next twenty-five years, the next fifty?’
      • ‘Such, at any rate, was the answer that rang back at my moment of frustration and paralysis and panic.’
      • ‘I am, at any rate, tempted to apply it to creatures like Professors Thornton and Campbell.’
      • ‘The workforce has, at any rate, been trimmed down over the years.’
      in any case, anyhow, anyway, at all events, in any event, nevertheless
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Used to clarify or emphasize a statement.
        ‘the story, or at any rate, a public version of it, was known and remembered’
        • ‘The cure is simplicity itself, and in the neighbourhood of London, at any rate, could be carried out without any expense whatever.’
        • ‘I don't have any evidence of that, but at any rate his movement to do away with whatever he imported was started much earlier.’
        • ‘The ones who turned up on the first day, which was I think most of the team, or most of the ones who turned up at any rate, haven't been punished?’
        • ‘Also as usual, at any rate with Waters, there is a lesbian love story involved.’
        • ‘Nehru had an unusual capacity - unusual among politicians at any rate - to view both sides of the question.’
        • ‘But the hardships are in practice not so serious as might appear, at any rate in the case of statements which are ex facie defamatory.’
        • ‘Inevitably, some of the experts would be regarded, at any rate by some people, as even more distinguished than others.’
        • ‘If they are thus verified, such states may be taken to be universal, at any rate for human beings.’
        • ‘Fortunately in England at any rate, education produces no effect whatsoever.’
        • ‘Great story for a kid at any rate, because kids love horrific things.’
  • at this (or that) rate

    • If matters continue in this or that way.

      ‘at this rate, I won't have a job to go back to’
      • ‘But, in an e-mail to the executive committee, Mr Middleton claims there will be no students left at this rate.’
      • ‘We were going to have no chairs left at all, at this rate.’
      • ‘So, at this rate, the goal of universal basic education could be attained by 2006: nine years ahead of schedule.’
      • ‘Still, it would be pretty hard to include ‘computer consultant’ on my business card at this rate.’
      • ‘Heck, at this rate, they'll be bringing back disco and the polyester leisure suit.’
      • ‘At that rate, bankers and expense account diners only need apply.’
      • ‘Mate, enjoy making fun of our columnists because they've only got a few years left at this rate…’
      • ‘This week is going to drag on for ever at this rate.’
      • ‘Plus I can do it whilst continuing on with Season 6 of The X-Files on video as I'm never going to get it fiinshed at this rate!’
      • ‘Neither are ever likely to get finished at this rate; perhaps I'd be better off turning them into short stories or something.’
      • ‘I'll probably end up stabbed in a gutter somewhere at this rate.’
  • rate of return

    • The annual income from an investment expressed as a proportion (usually a percentage) of the original investment.

      • ‘Because of the time value of money, the longer the person lives, the lower the rate of return on the investment.’
      • ‘It is because the interest deduction impacts an investor's after-tax rate of return.’
      • ‘We do not actually attempt to get, say, a 10 percent real rate of return on the investment in our roading system.’
      • ‘This steepness indicates a large rate of return from transferring income from the young to the old.’
      • ‘The standard story of entry and exit leads to a long-run equilibrium in which all firms earn only a normal rate of return on investment.’
      • ‘In order to do that, the tax system must let savers earn the full gross rate of return on their investments.’
      • ‘There is a huge problem with the simple assumption that your expected annual rate of return is the same each and every year.’
      • ‘It will also use the money for financing investments that will produce a better rate of return than the interest it will have to pay on its new loan notes.’
      • ‘It has a high equity content of 80 per cent and a good rate of return.’
      • ‘These results show a very high private rate of return to investment in tertiary education.’

Origin

Late Middle English (expressing a notion of ‘estimated value’): from Old French, from medieval Latin rata (from Latin pro rata parte (or portione) ‘according to the proportional share’), from ratus ‘reckoned’, past participle of reri.

Pronunciation

rate

/reɪt/

Main definitions of rate in English

: rate1rate2rate3

rate2

verb

[with object]archaic
  • Scold (someone) angrily.

    ‘he rated the young man soundly for his want of respect’

Origin

Late Middle English: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

rate

/reɪt/

Main definitions of rate in English

: rate1rate2rate3

rate3

verb

British
  • variant spelling of ret

Pronunciation

rate

/reɪt/