Main definitions of rakish in English

: rakish1rakish2

rakish1

adjective

  • Having or displaying a dashing, jaunty, or slightly disreputable quality or appearance:

    ‘he had a rakish, debonair look’
    • ‘Maynard Dixon presented a slender, almost angular appearance with deep blue eyes, straight dark hair cascading toward one eye, a rakish mustache, slightly hooked nose, and long, facile hands.’
    • ‘He propelled me to my brothers and left with a bow and a rakish grin towards me.’
    • ‘Parliamentary propagandists accordingly disseminated an image of the typical cavalier as a rakish individual consumed by the pursuit of illicit pleasure and personal gain, a man devoid of moral principles.’
    • ‘He leapt away before I could retort, blew me a kiss, and with a rakish smile, ran into his house.’
    • ‘He returned my tentative smile with a rakish grin of his own.’
    • ‘In fact, on several occasions other characters draw attention to his obtuseness: fresh from the country, he is only imperfectly the rakish figure he imitates.’
    • ‘Instead of a cloak, the thin man wore a short blue cape, which was currently flipped over one shoulder in a rakish fashion.’
    • ‘We were also greeted by a large man in rumpled chef's whites and a rakish black beret, a handkerchief knotted jauntily around his neck.’
    • ‘He's made it to the top of his profession on his own terms, armed with a sharp intellect, a rakish charm, keen wit and passionate belief in justice.’
    • ‘But as times and tastes changed, it needed a catalyst to move beyond the shopworn stereotypes of LAPD cops as either by-the-book straight arrows or rakish, rule-breaking mavericks.’
    • ‘Then he smiled for the first time, giving his battered face a handsomely rakish air and shook his head.’
    • ‘Cory shook his head at her, his blond fringe falling over his dark eyes, giving him the rakish look.’
    • ‘His rakish good looks were captivating, though there was no warmth in his eyes.’
    • ‘A small smile materialized, making him appear rakish.’
    • ‘His face has a slightly rakish quality to it, his eyes gleaming with charm, and cunning.’
    • ‘When Margaret's marriage to a rakish fashion photographer broke up, she took up with a cad who promptly published a kiss-and-tell book on their affair.’
    • ‘The addition of a black leather flight jacket made him look like a particularly young and rakish test pilot.’
    • ‘With one or both side brims snapped up to the crown you get a rakish look which also stiffens the front brim against wind.’
    • ‘Tall, with a slightly rakish appearance, as if he'd just flown in from Monte Carlo or Rio or the south of France, Mark Bradshaw turned heads everywhere he went.’
    • ‘He arrives on the dot, his tall, dark-haired, slightly rakish figure hurrying up Petergate through the crowds.’
    dashing, debonair, sporty, jaunty, devil-may-care, breezy
    stylish, fashionable, dapper, spruce
    raffish, disreputable, louche
    sharp
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 17th century: from rake + -ish.

Pronunciation:

rakish

/ˈreɪkɪʃ/

Main definitions of rakish in English

: rakish1rakish2

rakish2

adjective

  • (especially of a boat or car) smart and fast-looking, with streamlined angles and curves:

    ‘a rakish Chevrolet’
    • ‘Its rakish nose and large headlamps give it a sporty look, but the car seems to run out of styling ideas at the back end where the curved side screens give it a droopy appearance.’
    • ‘At a glance the long-nosed, low-wing Aztec bore a very strong resemblance to Irv Dunn's departed Twin Bonanza, with the Aztec's more rakish vertical tail a distinguishing feature.’
    • ‘Huge parking lots, which were fully packed throughout the day with scores of sleek bikes, elegant two-wheelers and rakish cars, stand forlorn and neglected with nothing but tyre tracks and fading oil leaks on the ground.’

Origin

Early 19th century: from rake + -ish.

Pronunciation:

rakish

/ˈreɪkɪʃ/