Main definitions of rake in English

: rake1rake2rake3rake4rake5

rake1

noun

  • 1An implement consisting of a pole with a toothed crossbar or fine tines at the end, used especially for drawing together cut grass or smoothing loose soil or gravel.

    • ‘A spring tine or garden rake is all that is needed for the job but allow a good amount of time, especially if the lawn is large.’
    • ‘We get up at 6.30 am and head out to the beach with our wheelbarrows, shovels, rakes, machete and rubbish bags.’
    • ‘Before planting, loosen the soil with a rake or hoe.’
    • ‘To prepare a surface for planting, use a flat-head rake to clear away pebbles and other debris and to smooth out terrain.’
    • ‘Work in small sections, and then remove the debris with a rake.’
    • ‘But it comes away pretty easily if you go at them with a sturdy rake.’
    • ‘Also she has three vacuum cleaners, two lawnmowers, four rakes, eight sacks of topsoil, a pile of gravel up against the garage door, and a garage full of things.’
    • ‘Loosen the soil with a rake to aerate it and remove any weeds and small stones.’
    • ‘With a fine-toothed hacksaw, cut off as many tines as needed for the rake to fit between your plants.’
    • ‘Mix a 2-to 3-inch layer of organic mulch into the soil, then level the planting area with a rake.’
    • ‘Having shovels, rakes, wheelbarrows, quality seeds, and so on made their life a good bit easier than it would have been otherwise, but it was hardly comfortable.’
    • ‘Richard went around to the back to get a rake and wheelbarrow.’
    • ‘The rest bring their own pruning saws, chainsaws, rakes, trimmers, blowers and whatever else is needed and do the work that is set out in the yearly planner.’
    • ‘The rake or dethatcher will create shallow grooves in the soil which will catch the new grass seed that you spread.’
    • ‘Occasionally she needs to touch up the rake with a little extra glue, but that's less expensive than purchasing a new rake.’
    • ‘She runs down the aisle and looks at the rakes and gardening supplies.’
    • ‘The hardware stores sold spades, forks, rakes and all sorts of farming implements.’
    • ‘Moving the soil surface with a rake in winter will expose many slugs and their eggs to frost damage.’
    • ‘Use a tarp to collect trimmings or a rake to clean up afterward.’
    • ‘However, I did read somewhere that you can rip up the dead grass, with a metal rake, and reseed.’
    1. 1.1 An implement similar to a rake used for other purposes, e.g. by a croupier drawing in money at a gaming table.
    2. 1.2in singular An act of raking.
      ‘giving the lawn a rake’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Draw together with a rake or similar implement.

    ‘they started raking up hay’
    • ‘I began raking up the leaves and branches I'd trimmed, and clearing out a lot of debris that had collected in and around the branchy bush.’
    • ‘If possible create an alternative hedgehog home by placing some boxes in the surrounding area or raking up grass cuttings or autumn leaves into a pile a safe distance from the fire.’
    • ‘Jeff found Adam in front of his house, raking up autumn leaves.’
    • ‘Zack and I went home and spent the morning doing yardwork, raking up the wet leaves that littered our backyard, and the afternoon running errands and grocery shopping.’
    • ‘That is why good sanitation begins with raking up apple leaves in the fall to either compost or bury deep in the woods.’
    • ‘Jogging, walking, swimming, even dancing or a half-day spent raking leaves and hoeing weeds are suggested.’
    • ‘I bought it on Friday, imagining that we'd spend the weekend raking up leaves together in the warm winter sunshine.’
    • ‘But if you try and use it for raking up the leaves, you'll just make a mess of the garden.’
    • ‘He turned around and continued raking together a heap of dried winter leaves on the lawn.’
    • ‘It includes nonsense about not raking up lawn clippings, using fluorescent light bulbs and getting your old clunker of a car tuned more often.’
    • ‘Nowadays, women think that they cannot so much as rake a few leaves without adorning themselves in a pair of pants.’
    • ‘He could see Kevin David out in the back garden, raking up the leaves, which was usually his parting gesture.’
    • ‘So I have four more blinds to hang, 32 more admissions files to read, and a yard full of leaves that cannot be raked today because it is already dark out.’
    • ‘Also, raking up and destroying dropped fruit will diminish these pests over time.’
    • ‘Today I was driving up to the grocery store when I saw him raking leaves on a property he owns up the street.’
    • ‘If there are deciduous trees in the picture-perfect expanse, their leaves will be raked, gathered, and disposed of at the curb.’
    • ‘We spent several hours this morning raking up the leaves and sawing up the fallen trees in our yard.’
    • ‘You can help control it by raking up and disposing of the fallen leaves in autumn.’
    • ‘I tumbled into the pile of dry leaves that my father was raking up in the yard of our small suburban house.’
    • ‘Begin raking up autumn leaves from lawns and pathways.’
    scrape together, scrape up, collect, gather
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Make (ground) smooth with a rake.
      ‘I sometimes rake over the allotment’
      • ‘‘When we filled the hole we overfilled it to allow for settlement and since then have raked over the ground in the past year to level it out,’ he added.’
      smooth, smooth out, level, even out, flatten, comb
      View synonyms
  • 2Scratch or scrape (something, especially a person's flesh) with a long sweeping movement.

    ‘her fingers raked Bill's face’
    • ‘The first shot of this is an establishing shot with a stone table, restraints and a table with canes, whips, and instruments for raking flesh.’
    • ‘Their icy fingers raked my flesh as I swung my arm wildly.’
    • ‘Mitsurugi's claws bit into flesh and raked across her chest.’
    scratch, lacerate, scrape, rasp, graze, abrade, grate, bark
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1with object and adverbial of direction Draw or drag (something) through something with a sweeping movement.
      ‘she raked a comb through her hair’
      • ‘Now entirely awake, Asa grabbed a comb off the desk and began to rake it through her long, dripping brown hair.’
      • ‘Ethan raked a hand back through his hair and drew in a breath.’
      • ‘She raked her brightly polished fingers through her hair in annoyance, taking a seat on top of her cluttered desk.’
      • ‘I must keep her sweet so that she doesn't rake my scalp with the comb.’
      • ‘A moment later he sighed heavily, raking his hand back through his hair as he glanced over at Lisa.’
      • ‘‘This is stupid,’ he informed her lowly, raking a hand through his dark hair.’
      drag, pull, scrape, draw, tug
      View synonyms
    2. 2.2 Sweep (something) from end to end with gunfire, a look, or a beam of light.
      ‘the road was raked with machine-gun fire’
      • ‘Machine gun fire began raking the fields, and muzzle flashes illuminated the underbrush of the nearby trees.’
      • ‘The ambassador was driving for an unscheduled appointment when his convoy was raked with small-arms gunfire, but the ambassador wasn't injured.’
      • ‘A burst of machinegun fire raked the spot I had been previously.’
      • ‘Suddenly machine-gun fire raked the bridge and the pilothouse, shattering the safety windows.’
      • ‘Cobra and Huey helicopters raked buildings with gunfire, and the bombs dropped by the F - 16s flattened several structures.’
      sweep, enfilade, pepper, strafe
      View synonyms
    3. 2.3no object, with adverbial of direction Move across something with a long sweeping movement.
      ‘his icy gaze raked mercilessly over Lissa's slender figure’
      • ‘Some of the ball players looked at each other as his gaze raked over each of them.’
      • ‘She saw the question in his eyes and smiled sweetly, her gaze raking over him swiftly.’
      • ‘Aubrey went directly to his wife and Montrose's gaze raked over both Claire and Evelyn.’
      • ‘Garret fought the urge to squirm as he felt her eyes rake over him.’
      • ‘‘No problem, sweetie,’ he told her, his gaze raking over her body.’
      • ‘The beautiful occupants of the room looked up at Amy and I, and I felt their astonished eyes rake over my body.’
      • ‘Her gaze raked over the place and stopped suddenly over a man with platinum blonde hair, spiked up.’
      • ‘I was surprise by the intensity in his gaze as his eyes raked over me.’
      • ‘Leaning against the doorjam, his eyes watched her every move, raking over her soft curves and taut skin boldly.’
      • ‘His gaze rakes over her bare stomach and arms briefly, but not long enough to make her uncomfortable.’
      search, scan, look around, look over, look round, survey, study, inspect, scour, scrutinize, examine, explore
      View synonyms
    4. 2.4no object, with adverbial Search or rummage through something.
      ‘he raked through his pockets and brought out a five-pound note’
      • ‘He's raking through the bins searching for anything recyclable to put in his already bulging trolley.’
      • ‘He placed his bag down on the dark ground and began to rake through it.’
      rummage, search, hunt, sift, rifle
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • rake and scrape

    • dialect Be extremely thrifty; scrimp and save.

  • rake over (old) coals (or rake over the ashes)

    • Revive the memory of an incident which is best forgotten.

      ‘no point in raking over old coals, opening old sores’
      • ‘It's hard to know of which he is more ashamed - purposely ignoring a man with facial scarring or being caught raking over the ashes of his career at a sci-fi fair.’
      • ‘Its editors aren't interested in raking over old coals or giving a definitive account of how the looting happened.’
      • ‘They don't want to rake over old coals or engage in mudslinging but they stand by their investigation and are quite happy for work to be looked at and let the public judge it.’
      • ‘Last Friday in Edinburgh, Masterton and Burt were still raking over the ashes over their loss.’
      • ‘At first Rob treated it like any other job: it was history and nothing much could be gained by raking over old coals.’
      • ‘Will the best man rake over old coals in his speech?’
  • (as) thin as a rake

    • (of a person) very thin.

      ‘in spite of all this food I remained as thin as a rake’
      • ‘But there was that guy who was thin as a rake and eat several Big Macs a day.’
      • ‘Katy ducked behind John, then peered around him to see an old man with yellowing eyes and white hair, with a bent back and thin as a rake.’
      • ‘He was as thin as a rake, and was taller than most men at that age.’
      • ‘Soon she will realise that no matter how much the old boy eats he stays thin as a rake.’
      • ‘My father died at the age of 79 and was as thin as a rake all his life, however, my youngest brother and two of my uncles had paunches, so maybe there is a genetic element to my problem.’
      • ‘He's short, receding, sallow-skinned and thin as a rake!’
      • ‘He was very tall, about six foot two, and as thin as a rake.’
      • ‘Marc dressed in black, looking thin as a rake and white as a sheet.’
      • ‘My friend was only 14 and was thin as a rake with tell tale signs of drug abuse which I didn't know then.’
      • ‘He should be thin as a rake.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • rake something in

    • Make a lot of money.

      ‘the shop's raking it in now’
      • ‘The Government just intends to keep on raking it in, and dishing it out to those who it hopes will vote it back into office.’
      • ‘While top executives are raking it in, wages for workers are diminishing.’
      • ‘The 61-year-old is expected to be a recurring character in the films and, with 10 books in the series, he could be raking in the money well into his 70s.’
      • ‘Given the amount of money stores rake in from gift lists, you would have thought they would have treated those customers with a little more appreciation.’
      • ‘I know someone who erects TV aerials around the local area and he's raking it in.’
      • ‘You've got to have a lot of time to put into investing in stocks in order to do it right and rake the money in.’
      • ‘There's a guy peddling alternative healthcare all over Scotland, strutting about like a guru, who must be raking it in.’
      • ‘Its sequel, Shrek 2, is now raking it in at the box office worldwide.’
      • ‘Either way you look at it, she must be raking in the money.’
      • ‘They want to continue raking the cash in by sitting on the boards of companies.’
      • ‘By selling licenses to private operators instead of just handing them out to cronies, the city raked in a lot of money.’
      • ‘The company's going through an expansion period and the good salespeople are raking in insane amounts of money.’
      • ‘The companies then do the expensive but scientifically easy trials and rake in all the money (and now it seems, the credit as well).’
      • ‘With the casinos downtown making millions and CEOs are raking it in how can they say there is no money for schools?’
      • ‘Although privateers are raking it in from the Darent Valley deal, patients have not been so fortunate.’
      • ‘The result is they must also have long-term contracts for the supply of gas, which is where the National Gas Company rakes in money.’
      • ‘The people in the stands are happy, the athletes win fat contracts, and the owners rake in the money.’
      • ‘When stocks are soaring and initial public offerings are raking in the money, it can seem like a bull market will never end.’
      • ‘But while the rich rake it in, the poor continue to lose their jobs.’
      • ‘He owns a quickly growing Internet service and he's raking in a lot of money.’
      earn, make, get, gain, get paid, obtain, acquire, accumulate, bring in, gather in, pull in, haul in, pocket, realize, make a profit of, fetch, return, yield, raise, clear, net, gross
      View synonyms
  • rake something up/over

    • Revive the memory of an incident or period that is best forgotten.

      ‘I have no desire to rake over the past’
      • ‘What I said was that as far as I was concerned I was not going to rake over the past.’
      • ‘In the Narasimha Rao years, the issue was raked up when the Prime Minister held the post of the party president, and several chief ministers did not give up PCC presidentship.’
      • ‘Why was I raking up the past and what was my ‘agenda’?’
      • ‘Although it would mean raking up painful memories, he did make a statement.’
      • ‘I cannot think that it is genuinely in the pursuers' interests to rake over those memories, especially where the individual nuns that are said to have been responsible are either dead or elderly.’
      • ‘I didn't want to look back and rake over things in my past - I wanted to be able to move on with my life.’
      remind people of, revive the memory of, recollect, remember, call to mind
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English raca, racu, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch raak and German Rechen, from a base meaning ‘heap up’; the verb is partly from Old Norse raka ‘to scrape, shave’.

Pronunciation

rake

/reɪk/

Main definitions of rake in English

: rake1rake2rake3rake4rake5

rake2

noun

dated
  • A fashionable or wealthy man of immoral or promiscuous habits.

    ‘a merry Restoration rake’
    • ‘By mid-century, reformers adopted a belief in the future which had previously belonged to speculators, rakes and gamblers - those sinners, in other words, who had always been consigned to the devil.’
    • ‘Ed Stoppard makes Harry a benevolent rake who throws himself at the absurdly coquettish widow for the sake of her £50,000.’
    • ‘Yet Orléans deserves to be remembered as something more than a rake.’
    • ‘The picture centered on a rake's efforts to seduce an innocent but very candid young woman.’
    • ‘A female fell for a handsome rake who had already been spoken for; both the girls cuddled up to him, one on either side, hurling accusations over his head.’
    • ‘Affable, intelligent, and a talented general, the regent was also a libertine and a rake who had fallen foul of the starchy atmosphere of Versailles during Louis XIV's twilight years.’
    • ‘His brother, after living the dissolute life of a rake, had fled England at the end of the war to escape his debts.’
    • ‘Perhaps more surprisingly, Lucio, the rake and libertine, also sees the value of chastity.’
    • ‘Willoughby is a rake, seducing women without thinking of either their feelings or the consequences of his actions.’
    • ‘His glacially cold mother despised family life and soon turned her back on her son, while his father was one of the most legendary rakes of Louis XV's reign.’
    • ‘Other characters include Hellena, Florinda's sister, and Willmore, a young rake who falls in love with her.’
    playboy, libertine, profligate
    View synonyms

Main definitions of rake in English

: rake1rake2rake3rake4rake5

rake3

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Set (something) at a sloping angle.

    ‘the floor is steeply raked’
    • ‘His steeply raked cheekbones, dreadlocks and jet-colored eyes, suggest a background that might be Mongolian, American Indian or Chinese.’
    • ‘The S80 has soft lines with a gently sloping hood, steeply raked windscreen, slightly bowed roofline and coupe-like rear window.’
    • ‘Sporting a body that borrows styling themes from the SLR supercar, it features a more-pronounced hood, steeply raked windshield and wider doors.’
    • ‘The prologue opened with a stark black, steeply raked stage with just a chair for Swallow.’
    • ‘Overall, the new car is very different from the earlier model, with the loss of the traditional wedge shape, a fairly low-to-ground crouch, and a steeply raked rear end.’
    • ‘Featuring 14 screens showing predominantly mainstream fare, each offers steeply raked stadium seating with ample leg room, drink holders and a perfect view of the screen.’
    • ‘There are sleeker body frame pillars, a steeply raked windscreen (the key to the car's lines) and a slicker, sportier back-end with rear spoiler and clutter-free hatch door.’
    • ‘Thanks to its flat roof and more upright glass all round, the interior is less exposed to the sun, so the presence or absence of air conditioning is not as critical as in most modern cars with their steeply raked windscreens.’
    • ‘Some of the unique features of the home are lovely polished floors, raked ceilings, French doors and a big designer kitchen.’
    • ‘Where the Matrix scores visibly is its deep side windows providing good viewing all-round, and its steeply raked windscreen which also helps with the aerodynamics.’
    • ‘The seats are steeply raked and we look down at the operating table, a slab of wood like a butcher's block.’
    • ‘The seats are steeply raked but there is plenty of room between aisles.’
    • ‘As with many 1960s British theatres the seats are all on one steeply raked tier; unusually they are undivided by aisles, keeping the audience as a single unit.’
    • ‘Their steeply raked windshields and low seats gave them a track-ready look but made them awkward to use (though they are comfortable enough once you're inside).’
    • ‘A downside to the steeply raked windscreen is that taller drivers may find they are sitting just a little too high for comfort.’
    • ‘It is also easy on the eye with its long bonnet, steeply raked windscreen, wide doors and short boot, with an extra 30 mm on the wheelbase helping to provide it with its distinctive arrow-like tapering front.’
    • ‘Christopher Barreca's set is a round arena behind which stretches a steeply raked platform, half of which sometimes turns into a set of stairs.’
    • ‘He leads me through a barn door, rather incongruous in the cub scout hallway, into the theatre itself - 43 steeply raked seats and a bare floor space, not more than a few metres either way.’
    • ‘The stage seemed a long way away, but the amphitheatre is steeply raked, so there was no problem seeing the big picture.’
    • ‘A glass bridge leads to a suspended balcony that hovers within the double-height lobby of Sello Hall, providing access to its 402 steeply raked seats.’
    1. 1.1no object (of a ship's mast or funnel) incline from the perpendicular towards the stern.
      ‘her long clipper bow and raked mast’
    2. 1.2no object (of a ship's bow or stern) project at its upper part beyond the keel.

noun

  • 1in singular The angle at which a thing slopes.

    ‘you can adjust the rake of the backrests’
    • ‘To do this, cut 6 inches off the first shingle of the second course at the rake of the slope.’
  • 2The angle of the edge or face of a cutting tool.

Phrases

  • a rake's progress

    • dated A progressive deterioration, especially through self-indulgence.

      ‘his downfall was a rake's progress of late nights and seedy bars’

Origin

Mid 17th century: abbreviation of archaic rakehell in the same sense<br>early 17th century: probably related to German ragen ‘to project’, of unknown ultimate origin; compare with Swedish raka.

Pronunciation

rake

/reɪk/

Main definitions of rake in English

: rake1rake2rake3rake4rake5

rake4

noun

British
  • A number of railway carriages or wagons coupled together.

    ‘we have converted one locomotive and a rake of coaches to air braking’

Origin

Early 20th century (originally Scots and northern English): from Old Norse rák ‘stripe, streak’, from an alteration of rek- ‘to drive’. The word was in earlier use in the senses ‘path, groove’ and ‘vein of ore’.

Pronunciation

rake

/reɪk/

Main definitions of rake in English

: rake1rake2rake3rake4rake5

rake5

noun

rare
  • A herd of colts.

Origin

Late Middle English: origin uncertain; perhaps an alteration of rag or from obsolete or Scots rake ‘a rush, a run’.

Pronunciation

rake

/reɪk/