Definition of railwayman in English:

railwayman

noun

British
  • A man who works on a railway.

    • ‘Since the fragmentation of the railway in Britain railwaymen have constantly complained about the situation and the results have not been good.’
    • ‘The Triple Alliance of transport workers, miners, and railwaymen was in existence by 1914 and had a strategy of sympathy strikes in place.’
    • ‘Perhaps only a railwayman could reminisce about his former workplace with such affection.’
    • ‘Helped by railwaymen, lorry drivers and workers in the power industry, they won a magnificent victory.’
    • ‘‘Once a railwayman, always a railwayman,’ he said.’
    • ‘He enjoyed a forty-five-year working career as a freight railwayman from 1947, when he joined the Great Western Railway.’
    • ‘A teenager who suffered a brain haemorrhage when he fell from his bike on the way to catch a train has been reunited with the railwayman who helped to save his life.’
    • ‘Seventy-five years ago, at a junction of the Great North of Scotland Railway known as Inveramsay, the local railwaymen used as their base a two-roomed shack.’
    • ‘They insisted, against much opposition from conservative railwaymen, that what the inter-city link needed was new standard-gauge dedicated track.’
    • ‘The formal creation of the Chinese Communist Party came in 1921, after a year or so of successful experience in creating trade unions among railwaymen, miners, seamen, printers, and others.’
    • ‘The anonymous railwayman could not have foreseen that the posters would eventually become one of the hottest properties in a very hot area of collecting - ‘railwayana’.’
    • ‘There would then be a period of practical training on the track, using close personal supervision involving experienced railwaymen from Jarvis.’
    • ‘His practical experience as a railwayman caused him to look with a more critical eye on railway administration both before and after privatisation.’
    • ‘He succeeded Clemenceau as Prime Minister in 1909 and betrayed his former socialist beliefs by breaking a strike of railwaymen in 1910.’
    • ‘Advisory medical standards are in place for certain occupations, such as in the armed forces and police, railwaymen, and professional divers.’
    • ‘In the intervening months, 49,000 pensioners, housewives, retired railwaymen and amateur investors had banded together to mount the largest class action this country has ever seen.’
    • ‘I acknowledge the enthusiasm and unstinted support of railwaymen without whose dedicated efforts the creditable achievements of the Railways would not have been possible.’
    • ‘He said it was a shame a bit of history was coming to end and it would be mourned by longer-serving railwaymen.’
    • ‘Just five days after the strike began 15,000 railwaymen, and 8,000 dockers and carters were on strike.’
    • ‘Former railwaymen have told me what it was like to be in the place during its splendour.’

Pronunciation:

railwayman

/ˈreɪlweɪmən/