Definition of railroad in English:

railroad

noun

  • North American term for railway
    • ‘In many countries railways were owned by the federal government, in the United States uniquely there were only private railroads.’
    • ‘Some believe that it was originally only a two-decker, perhaps matching the two-decker ‘club cars’ running on US railroads from 1895.’
    • ‘The promoters of both railroads had employed construction companies they themselves owned, although they had tried to hide the fact.’
    • ‘In 1914, President Woodrow Wilson formally selected the route for a new railroad between the sheltered harbours of Alaska's coastal inlets and the gold and coal fields of the interior.’
    • ‘One of his major research interests is the history of U.S. railroads and their financing.’
    • ‘Her seventh son became an engineer, building bridges for railroads throughout Africa and South America.’
    • ‘The Erie built it to connect its mainline with other railroads.’
    • ‘The golden age of American railroads overlapped the early age of commercial sound recordings.’
    • ‘In 1845, the United States helped build the first transcontinental railroad that crossed Panama.’
    • ‘It is a reminder, too, that the story of the C&O is about more than railroads and railroading.’
    • ‘A century and a half ago, it might as well have been Mars, so inaccessible was it before the railroads.’
    • ‘However, it was only after the establishment of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1871 that the railroads were to become the true backbone of Canada.’
    • ‘Taking advantage of the growing electrical network, urban electric railroads and underground railroads emerged.’
    • ‘Certainly the Confederate government displayed no outstanding understanding of how to run a railroad.’
    • ‘The nation's passenger railroad is supposed to be a for-profit corporation, but Amtrak's never made money.’
    • ‘James J. Hill built a transcontinental railroad, the Great Northern, without any government aid, while opposing government assistance to his competitors.’
    • ‘The railroad's arrival in May of 1869 dramatically transformed the consumer marketplace in Utah.’
    • ‘Construction of the first U.S. passenger railroad, the Baltimore and Ohio, began on 4 July 1828.’
    • ‘Immigrant Irish and Chinese men worked as day laborers building the transcontinental railroads.’
    • ‘The rolling stock was purchased second hand, often as scrap from the mainline railroads.’

verb

  • 1informal [with object] Rush or coerce (someone) into doing something:

    ‘she hesitated, unwilling to be railroaded into a decision’
    • ‘Club coaches said they had been railroaded into taking late night slots and wanted the Friday night session to be an hour earlier.’
    • ‘From early on, therefore, the developing countries worried they would be railroaded into a last-minute deal.’
    • ‘Instead of taking the lead in tackling the problem, once again they are being railroaded into joining a ‘global coalition’.’
    • ‘Customers often allow themselves to be railroaded into making bad decisions by a salesperson's use of false dilemma.’
    • ‘We felt railroaded into it, and we're seething.’
    • ‘She had been railroaded into the job, under the supervision of a widely reviled manager, because no one inside the company would take it.’
    • ‘The operators were railroaded into agreeing to the move, and no one bothered to ask the people who actually pay to use the deckchairs: The tourists who go to the beach to relax.’
    • ‘Her success seems to have railroaded her husband into a supporting role.’
    • ‘My mother railroaded me into netball and hockey but I didn't know the rules, and I tripped over a lot.’
    • ‘Speaking after the London meeting, he denied he was trying to railroad families into accepting compensation rather than taking the lawsuit option.’
    • ‘Instead of giving the player real choices, the game gives players the appearance of choice, but really just railroads them down the same path as everyone else.’
    • ‘Jason didn't like being railroaded into anything, but he did feel sorry for Janice.’
    • ‘‘I sometimes feel I'm getting railroaded into a poor deal,’ he explains.’
    • ‘We won't be railroaded into a decision, you know.’
    • ‘But neither she nor her three sisters, who are 12, 19 and 23, were railroaded into sport.’
    • ‘I was railroaded into a way of making music I wouldn't have gone for.’
    • ‘They took no notice of the opposition and just railroaded people into this.’
    • ‘Their policies are attempting to railroad people into urban settlements by objecting to planning applications in rural areas.’
    • ‘We have a young parliament, and we hardly need to be railroaded into a supposedly ‘voluntary’ scheme.’
    • ‘Zack was reluctant and frowning, but I exercised fatherly priviledge and basically railroaded him into the trip.’
    coerce, force, compel, pressure, pressurize, badger, hustle, pester, hound, harass, nag, harry, urge, goad, prod, spur
    browbeat, bludgeon, bulldoze, steamroller, dragoon, prevail on, strong-arm
    bounce
    fast-talk
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Cause (a measure) to be passed or approved quickly by applying pressure:
      ‘the Bill had been railroaded through the House’
      • ‘He said: ‘Ten people who don't know the town will decide the future of that site. The way things get railroaded through district is unbelievable.’’
      • ‘‘It was the best decision,’ Amien later replied when asked by journalist about the compromise he railroaded through.’
      • ‘The fact is that the decision was railroaded through after normal business and residents were given minimal notice of the street closure.’
      • ‘What he has failed to grasp is that because he stole all the past elections, he has invalidated any laws that he has railroaded through his parliament.’
      • ‘The Stennis compromise - no compromise in his mind - was being railroaded through.’
      • ‘For that reason, they're too important to be railroaded through Congress.’
      • ‘This was railroaded through so fast most local governments didn't even know about it.’
      • ‘Another chilling measure was railroaded through federal parliament this week without any noticeable media coverage.’
      • ‘In this kind of climate, political decisions that should be the subject of public debate, such as extra powers for the police, can be railroaded through because dissent is not allowed.’
      • ‘The government wants to railroad Agenda for Change through.’
      • ‘Much of this legislation, cynically titled the USA Patriot Act, was railroaded through Congress within six weeks of the terrorist attacks of that fateful September morning.’
      • ‘What are the contentious issues in those suggestions and are you worried the regulations may be railroaded through?’
      • ‘This whole process has been railroaded through and we are seeking a fair and reasonable industrial solution in the interests of the public and firefighters.’
      • ‘They planned to railroad it through with less than ten weeks from announcement to agreement.’
      • ‘There is never any harm in debating such issues, but this is not about debate, it is about railroading things through,’ he said.’
      • ‘The Conservatives railroaded through their market-led reforms, imposing the number-crunchers on hospitals to find out, for the first time, what healthcare really cost.’
      • ‘At the same time, the new voting system will be instrumental in preventing the speaker from railroading contentious bills in a unilateral manner.’
      • ‘He is a member of the major opposition Nationalist Party, which railroaded the nuclear power project while still Taiwan's ruling party.’
      • ‘They feel the plans were railroaded through the district council and they have addressed their concerns to the Local Government Ombudsman.’
      • ‘He claimed the developer was railroading the development of the site and the manager's enforcement order was being ignored.’
    2. 1.2North American Send (someone) to prison without a fair trial:
      ‘they know I was railroaded and falsely accused’
      • ‘I knew he was innocent, and I had a unique perspective, where I saw the way in which he had gotten railroaded and convicted.’
      • ‘Criminal cops ride roughshod over prosecutors and juries and railroad people into prison or worse.’
      • ‘Editors may be more skeptical of authority today, but they do not all believe the Harlem boys were railroaded by a frenzied press and a zealous prosecution.’
      • ‘I have since viewed the two documentaries and am convinced these poor kids were railroaded.’
      • ‘Prosecutors and court judges routinely promoted and rewarded police misconduct, as hundreds of innocent persons were railroaded and tossed into prison.’
      • ‘In the end, while one can reasonably argue that Arnold got what he deserved, the indications are that Jesse was railroaded and ended up serving time for a crime he did not commit.’
      • ‘The kinds of things endured by the characters in this film would have been minor irritants to the man, who was railroaded and falsely convicted of a murder because of his race.’
      • ‘The former member of the Black Panther Party and a radio journalist was railroaded to prison 18 years ago on charges that he murdered a Philadelphia policeman.’
      • ‘They set about to swiftly close the case and make an example of the alleged perpetrators, who were quickly railroaded to prison.’
      • ‘The novel is about an innocent white man on death row, railroaded because officials needed to prove that the death penalty isn't racially biased.’
      • ‘It's also clear to me that he's been railroaded.’
      • ‘The country had plenty of experience with its rulers using puppet prosecutors and judges to railroad so-called enemies of the state into prison or worse.’
      • ‘He presided over a criminal courtroom where, as in most such courtrooms in Los Angeles, defendants were railroaded by false testimony by cops.’
      • ‘It is a testament to the jury that they refused to be part of the attempt to railroad innocent men to jail.’
      • ‘Thomas, who did not testify, contended that he fled because he feared he would be railroaded - or shot - by police after he was identified as a suspect.’
      • ‘It details conditions where suspects - who are overwhelmingly poor and minority - lack adequate access to counsel and are frequently railroaded to death row with little or no substantiating evidence.’
      • ‘He was railroaded into a Mexican prison.’
      • ‘This might have been a convenient time for Specter to mention his real concern that the only person arrested in this grandest of grand larcenies was an innocent man being railroaded because of his race.’
      • ‘When good men were railroaded without a shred of due process, who was speaking up?’
      • ‘If somebody tries to railroad me, I'm going at them.’
  • 2North American usually as noun railroading[no object] Travel or work on the railways:

    ‘the very early days of railroading’
    • ‘Something was going on with railroading, something I had not encountered in my own research on the pre-World War II era.’
    • ‘It is a reminder, too, that the story of the C&O is about more than railroads and railroading.’
    • ‘It comes highly recommended if you are into such museums and are curious about the history of passenger railroading in this part of the country.’
    • ‘Sunday, May 1, 1960, is a date that will not be soon forgotten in the annals of Canadian steam railroading.’
    • ‘How skillfully the timetable must be worked out, and how unwaveringly its edicts must be carried through, adds up to the fine art of railroading.’
    • ‘Rail fans can enjoy sitting trackside, watching modern railroading and enjoying the historic connection with the Great Northern Railroad.’
    • ‘Fergy was quite entertaining, quipping about railroading in general and about some of the sights we would be passing.’
    • ‘However, the MOT's founders still ended up with arguably the most representative and thorough visual history of American railroading anywhere.’
    • ‘The two small branches offer the look and feel of small time railroading.’
    • ‘Wrinn began reading Trains at age 6, and the magazine helped spark a lifelong interest in railroading.’
    • ‘In one its few concessions to 20th century railroading, the WW & F had decided to allow the use of power tamping equipment.’
    • ‘Rather, the museum places railroading in the context of the community and focuses on the daily lives of the railroad's workers and families.’
    • ‘He enjoys railroading so much he even works on manufacturing real railcars for Gunderson in Portland.’
    • ‘It was the last big wreck of the steam era on the C.P.R., occurring shortly before I began railroading.’
    • ‘This will be one grand spectacular day of steam railroading!’
    • ‘Some friends and I had a recent discussion about today's railroading and how working conditions had improved for train crews.’
    • ‘Both Conductors were interesting people, retired and loved railroading.’
    • ‘As you might imagine, the weather in the Cascade Mountains is often not favorable for railroading.’
    • ‘His Irish ancestors had emigrated to the United States in the early 19th century and made fortunes in logging and railroading.’
    • ‘I have had an interest in railroading, and in railway signal systems, since I was about ten years old.’

Pronunciation:

railroad

/ˈreɪlrəʊd/