Main definitions of raffle in English

: raffle1raffle2

raffle1

noun

  • A means of raising money by selling numbered tickets, one or some of which are subsequently drawn at random, the holder or holders of such tickets winning a prize:

    [as modifier] ‘a raffle ticket’
    [with modifier] ‘a charity raffle’
    • ‘That night £600 was raised from ticket sales and raffles and everyone involved deserves a lot of thanks.’
    • ‘If all the raffle tickets sell, he said, Pipedream is expected to have around £30,000 by Easter.’
    • ‘They proudly told of how they had single-handedly raised money through cake sales, approaching businesses, holding raffles and selling chocolates.’
    • ‘Firemen around the nation are selling the raffle tickets for five dollars each.’
    • ‘The Lounge Committee had raffles to raise funds for furniture for the lounge, and for curtains and social events.’
    • ‘The voluntary group who need E30,000 every year to keep afloat raise money through raffles, sponsored walks and from donations.’
    • ‘Meanwhile his luck was still good when it came to the draw for the raffle prizes as his ticket was pulled out first from the hat.’
    • ‘Much of the money was raised through raffles, with wonderful prizes donated by local businesses.’
    • ‘The club would also like to thank all its patrons who kindly bought tickets for their raffles and who supported all the events that were organised through-out the season.’
    • ‘There was plenty of fine wine flowing and a ticket raffle draw with great prizes.’
    • ‘Sponsorship forms were put up in the pub and raffles raised extra money.’
    • ‘The hospices have been donated a brand-new car to give away as the star prize of the raffle but they need more help selling the raffle tickets.’
    • ‘It was great afternoon with a variety of jazz acts, raffles and promotions raising money for staging the convention.’
    • ‘The hard work of craft-minded kids and adults will be put up for raffle and auction by the Northside Centre in Sligo town.’
    • ‘The special children's raffle was most exciting, the draws supervised by the officer board ensured that everything was above board.’
    • ‘Still shy of the initial target, the Waterford News & Star came to the rescue with a Nissan Micra car which was put up for raffle.’
    • ‘At the conclusion of the cabaret the winning tickets for the raffle are drawn.’
    • ‘In the pubs and sports clubs they held raffles to raise money.’
    • ‘We compensated participants with movie tickets and raffles for prizes for the completion of measures and attendance at the workshop.’
    • ‘The couple decided to use the pen they won as a raffle prize to raise money for charity and are now looking for local businesses to donate further prizes.’
    lottery, sweepstake, sweep, tombola, ballot
    instants
    lotto, numbers game, numbers pool, numbers racket
    tote, pakapoo
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Offer as a prize in a raffle:

    ‘a toy polar bear was due to be raffled for the appeal’
    • ‘We would like to thank the public and all the business people who gave donations and sponsored some of the wonderful prizes which were raffled on the day.’
    • ‘It is also raffling a mountain bike for the school.’
    • ‘Amazing prizes will be raffled throughout the fun-filled night.’
    • ‘The plan is to make up a number of food and drink hampers to be raffled alongside an auction of ‘promises’, other goods, services and tickets.’
    • ‘Admission is €10 per person and all cooked dishes will be raffled.’
    • ‘Fee is e5 per class and includes a tea break and inclusion in a nightly raffle where the flower arrangement made on the night will be raffled off.’
    • ‘More seriously they were helping to raise funds for the tsunami appeal, raffling a superb prize donated by Nestlé of a day's motor racing.’
    • ‘The quilt will be raffled on June 5 at the Project centre with all proceeds donated to the Sponsor and Athlete Programme.’
    • ‘There are two lovely Christmas Hampers being raffled for members of the Kiltimagh District Credit Union this week.’
    • ‘Would the right thing to do be to hand the passes over to the parking department and put them back into circulation so they can be raffled off to the next lucky winner?’
    • ‘All flower arrangements displayed will be raffled on the night.’
    • ‘A number of very valuable prizes will be raffled during the night.’
    • ‘Two five-pound Easter baskets were raffled off.’
    • ‘Spot prizes were raffled after the ride out with a magnum of champagne attracting much attention from the ticket buyers.’
    • ‘On St. Patrick's Day the club raffled a signed and framed Liverpool F.C 2003-2004 away shirt as its first prize.’
    • ‘The fundraiser received a lot of support from the local traders in Abbeyleix who contributed a wide variety of prizes, which were raffled on the night.’
    • ‘John admitted that it was strange for a health food shop to be raffling a calorie-rich chocolate egg but added that it was all in a good cause.’
    • ‘The car will be raffled in 2005 as part of a major fund-raising drive which will involve the sale of tickets across the county.’
    • ‘This trip will be raffled off after the Expression Session at the US Open on August 4th 2002.’
    • ‘The credit union raffled three cars last year and plan to do the same this year.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a kind of dice game): from Old French, of unknown origin. The current sense dates from the mid 18th century.

Pronunciation:

raffle

/ˈraf(ə)l/

Main definitions of raffle in English

: raffle1raffle2

raffle2

noun

dialect
  • [mass noun] Rubbish; refuse:

    ‘the raffle of the yard below’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘rabble, riff-raff’): perhaps from Old French ne rifle ne rafle nothing at all.

Pronunciation:

raffle

/ˈraf(ə)l/