Definition of radiogram in English:

radiogram

noun

  • 1British historical A combined radio and record player built into a cabinet with a speaker.

    • ‘On the Saturday they went out shopping and I was aquiver with excitement, soon the disc would be in my hands and blaring out of the radiogram!’
    • ‘In the hands of an inebriated amateur at the Hogmanay party, it would have you rushing to put a Billy Eckstine or Fats Domino record on the radiogram.’
    • ‘It was between the settee and the coffee table, over towards the radiogram, away from the bookcase, right under the light fitting.’
    • ‘It must have been a pivotal year because I've had cause to reflect on my Melbourne Cup history this week and the win by Polo Prince in 1964 is the first I recall listening to on the radiogram.’
    • ‘I bought every 12-inch mix of the single that was available, and played them endlessly on the useless radiogram that comprised my state of the art hi-fi at the time.’
    • ‘I once got a stack of about ten albums, discovered inside an old radiogram my parents bought at an auction for the princely sum of £4.50.’
    • ‘And like hearing a familiar song on the radiogram, John found himself, but again… alone.’
    • ‘He once went out to buy a stylus for an old record player and came back with a radiogram.’
    • ‘My father's friend had a radiogram, a huge beast that incorporated a radio and a record player for 78s.’
    • ‘One year, she bought the radiogram.’
    • ‘Everyone was in awe - how could such a small device be so powerful as to do everything the much larger radiogram could?’
    • ‘The old radiogram my parents had is now just a bad memory.’
    • ‘We could gather around the radiogram, and later the television, or put a record on the gramophone and no one had to spend years practising.’
    • ‘And wind-up gramophones were all the general population could afford - the first generation of electric radiograms were as expensive as cars.’
    • ‘If you bought a sound system (as I believe radiograms are now known) from Clydesdale, you qualified for a weekend at a Forte hotel.’
    • ‘When my parents thought I was doing homework, I would lie underneath our radiogram and listen to his music.’
    • ‘For an outlay of 41 guineas, you could have a new radiogram, it promised, and 11 guineas bought the latest thing in radios - a transistor.’
    • ‘Back in the early fifties people across the land followed the Redex trial intently, listening in for updates in the daily news broadcasts from their valve radiograms.’
    • ‘Althoff grew up next to an old Bakelite Kreisler radiogram.’
  • 2

    another term for radiograph
    • ‘On radiogram, the ipsilateral hemithorax is lucent, the diaphragm is depressed, and the trachea and mediastinum are shifted contralaterally.’
  • 3historical A telegram sent by radio.

    • ‘The draft budget was approved without challenge reportedly after the council received a radiogram from the Ministry of Home Affairs urging it to approve the draft.’
    • ‘Subsequent reports confirmed the news, and at 0700 MacArthur received a radiogram from Washington authorizing him to implement war plans against Japan.’

Pronunciation:

radiogram

/ˈreɪdɪə(ʊ)ɡram/