Definition of radar in English:

radar

noun

mass noun
  • 1A system for detecting the presence, direction, distance, and speed of aircraft, ships, and other objects, by sending out pulses of radio waves which are reflected off the object back to the source.

    • ‘Using radar, the Protector system becomes active only after the driver has failed to react.’
    • ‘The development of radar to intercept aircraft and direct gunfire revolutionized the Allied bombing offensive.’
    • ‘Part of the reason was that corporate cost cutting had left the ship without radar.’
    • ‘The robot warriors use GPS, radar, laser radar and a host of other technologies to move without human aid.’
    • ‘The MCA said the study looked for impacts on compasses and various kinds of communications and positioning systems as well as radar.’
    • ‘Lidar is a remote sensing technique that uses laser light in much the same way that sonar uses sound or radar uses radio waves.’
    • ‘Chavez reported that Venezuelan radar detected the presence of the ships and planes during the coup attempt.’
    • ‘Most of us who drive cars have grown up since the advent of radar to detect speeding.’
    • ‘Digital cellphones are similar to radar, using pulses carried by microwaves.’
    • ‘These systems use radar as the surveillance and cueing sensor to achieve this.’
    • ‘If someone did try to destroy us we'd detect it on radar before we were hit and could send a blast straight back.’
    • ‘To an extent, higher speeds can also make aircraft more visible to radar and susceptible to threats.’
    • ‘After all, they argued, how can anyone seriously think photo radar will reduce speeding?’
    • ‘You even see a form of radar at many grocery stores when the doors open automatically!’
    • ‘Solid-state phase shifters steer optical beams for laser communications and radar.’
    • ‘The officer must have visual estimation of speed before using radar to confirm it.’
    • ‘The flares are fired when the crew detect, by radar, they are being chased by a missile homing in on the hot exhaust of the plane.’
    • ‘Its advanced stealth features help prevent the aircraft from being detected by radar.’
    • ‘That expelling of exhaust is vital in detecting their presence on radar.’
    • ‘The boats had such a low profile and were so quick that they could be within seven miles before radar detected them.’
    1. 1.1count noun An apparatus used for radar.
      • ‘Lo said the vessel's automatic navigation system and radar were damaged during the attack.’
      • ‘Our mission was to look for hostile radars as they became active.’
      • ‘Our radars indicate a multitude of small incoming fighters.’
      • ‘Once Saki broke through the atmosphere, the ship's radar picked up an approaching craft.’
      • ‘‘Some of the radars needed to track the incoming missile are not yet ready,’ says Marchildon.’
      • ‘It's a network of radars and defensive missiles that will begin operating, at least some of them will, by 2004.’
      • ‘Keep an eye on those radars, and listen to whatever is being said.’
      • ‘Cyclone detection doppler radars are replacing the conventional analogue radars in important locations along the east coast.’
      • ‘An additional limb in front is equipped with a metal detector and radar to find mines, a second sprays paint on the ground to mark the spot.’
      • ‘The radars use high frequency and advanced radar signal processing technology to improve target resolution.’
      • ‘Before these radars can become operational, the air force can use a medium-range unit with a range of 1,000 km.’
      • ‘Adjusting his grip on the controls, he began to veer away from the colony, lest he be detected by their radar.’
      • ‘Also in Alaska, there will be upgraded equipment and new radars for early warning.’
      • ‘The Patriot's radar sends out electronic pulses that scan the air space above it.’
      • ‘It hovers high above the clouds and literally no radar can detect it because of its wind-elemental cloak.’
      • ‘Our helicopters will rain fire down upon your camps before you detect them on your radar.’
      • ‘Park Air is a world leader in the field of integration, processing and display of data from radars, sensors and databases.’
      • ‘Invading foreign computer networks could shut down radars and electrical plants and disrupt telephone lines without firing a shot.’
      • ‘The system uses the ship's three dimensional circular scan radar for target tracking.’
      • ‘An incoming missile attack will initially be detected by the ship's long-range surveillance radar.’
    2. 1.2count noun A person's capacity for intuitive perception; a special sensitivity for factors, trends, etc.
      ‘keep your radar tuned to changes at work’
      • ‘It really is time to catch-up on Northern Ireland which has slipped off many radars, including mine, since September 11.’
      • ‘The casting directors all like to boast that they have a very sensitive radar for people who just want the celebrity of it.’
      • ‘She continued to explore adventurous roles whenever possible, though her radar was not always perfect.’
      • ‘Now emerging from under the radar is internet TV, but not TV as you've known it.’
      • ‘Harry Brown was never even a blip on the radar in any sense.’
      • ‘But if you have an overly sensitive radar for cinematic pomp, stay clear.’
      • ‘Yes, but this bishop passed under the cardinals' radars as well.’
    3. 1.3 Used to indicate that someone or something has or has not come to the attention of a person or group.
      ‘he's off the radar in the UK but in his country of birth he's a well-known figure’
      • ‘I wonder if there are lots of other conflicts dragging on in other regions below the media radar.’
      • ‘Next, and this almost slipped under the radar, Craig paid nearly a quarter million dollars in legal fees with his campaign fund.’
      • ‘Inner space has become a playground for uber-rich billionnaire tourists, and outer space is pretty much off the radar.’
      • ‘Winterland, a little CD released in the mid-80's and since having fallen under the radar, is one of the purest pleasures in the Hendrix catalog.’
      • ‘His private life better known in Britain than here at home has not appeared on the radar of the Canadian media.’
      • ‘For every person like this, there are probably a dozen or more false teachers flying under the media's radar.’
      • ‘From a finance standpoint, Telemundo is the merest blip on GE's radar.’
      • ‘We moved over to a network that had a lot of other problems, which were sometimes good for us because we were not on their radar.’
      • ‘Yet Bad Dreams, at least for me, flew under the radar.’
      • ‘Going into the home stretch, the 2nd District race finally made it onto the national political radar.’
      • ‘The new Russia is out to prove something, and I think Africa features prominently on their radar.’
      • ‘But there's often more egregious abuse among the tiny nonprofits that operate below the radar.’
      • ‘For Potterton and Dempsey, the deals must seem like minute blips on a large radar.’
      • ‘With the exception of Moldova, this year's performances don't rate a blip on the comedic radar compared to last year.’
      • ‘The bulk of the victims appear to be ordinary people who happen to have strayed across the media's radar.’
      • ‘It rarely raises a blip on the international radar.’
      • ‘It probably didn't cross their radar, as often happens with celebrity figures who have never presented themselves primarily as romantic characters.’
      • ‘Just a couple of things we want to put on your radar, certainly on our radar, this morning.’
      • ‘You may not know what you need, but at least by asking nightly, your radar will be wide open.’
      • ‘The big boys are on a merger binge that is paralyzing the industry and bumping fledgling and mid-range artists off the radar.’

Origin

1940s: from ra(dio) d(etection) a(nd) r(anging).

Pronunciation

radar

/ˈreɪdɑː/