Definition of racialism in English:

racialism

noun

  • another term for racism
    • ‘Those identifying an ethnic basis for sectional strife had greater affinity with a second intellectual trend of the mid-nineteenth century: the romantic racialism ascendant on both sides of the Atlantic.’
    • ‘This changed towards the end of the century, when a turn to evolutionist Darwinian theory and German nationalism drove German anthropology towards racialism.’
    • ‘Thankfully the obvious evils of Nazism forced many socialists to rethink their racialism, unfortunately leaving their loving faith in State supremacy and social engineering firmly intact.’
    • ‘And when race and diversity stand together as legitimate - even constitutional - principles, we have indeed arrived at the threshold of legally sanctioned racialism.’
    • ‘Because of that movement, a number of new laws and regulations were enacted to reduce racialism.’
    • ‘In all the social sciences, the doctrines of racialism were accepted as a given.’
    • ‘Thus, ‘Darwinist ideology,’ as she calls it, was appropriated by sections of the monarchy and capitalist class to fuel a growing racialism.’
    • ‘While eschewing explicit racialism, advocates of immigration restriction expressed anxiety that the immigrants posed a threat to the homogeneity of the United States.’
    • ‘For the sort of oppression they favour is the seed from which all racialism, including anti-Semitism, grows.’
    • ‘In Trinidad, I grew up in the last days of that kind of racialism.’
    • ‘More particularly, the factors that give rise to this condition are said to be the interlocking of massive unemployment, government legislation and growing racialism in local areas.’
    • ‘That was a decade before the October Revolution, but racialism was already widely accepted as the mark of the Left in many countries, including England.’
    • ‘Like others of her generation, she accepted, at least superficially, the ideology of racialism.’
    • ‘Nevertheless, varied combinations of ancient philosophical essentialism and nineteenth-century scientific racialism linger to this day in American folk concepts of race.’
    • ‘Although his classmates neither humiliated him nor embraced Nazi racialism, he writes, they ‘looked the other way’ when persecution began.’
    • ‘Her academic side includes research on hip-hop music and racialism.’
    • ‘She cites last year's hue and cry over the lack of minorities on network television shows as an example of racialism.’
    • ‘Once you realize that racialism is at the root of so many problems you can begin to overcome it and then overlook the differences between yourself and others around you.’

Pronunciation:

racialism

/ˈreɪʃəlɪz(ə)m/