Main definitions of quiz in English

: quiz1quiz2

quiz1

noun

  • 1A test of knowledge, especially as a competition between individuals or teams as a form of entertainment.

    ‘a sports quiz’
    ‘a pub quiz’
    [as modifier] ‘a quiz show’
    • ‘The couple took over the pub two years ago and have managed to attract new customers through activities such as music evenings, a quiz night and pub sports.’
    • ‘Radio presenters will travel across the county to report on the progress of quiz teams playing in pubs, clubs, churches, community halls, workplaces and at home.’
    • ‘Next Tuesday a general knowledge quiz open to teams of four will be held.’
    • ‘The team winning the quiz contest will get a cash prize of Rs.1 lakh and the second prize-winner, Rs.50,000.’
    • ‘I realise that I have been blessed with an exceptionally absorbent and retentive memory - oh you want me on your pub quiz team!’
    • ‘The most perfect evening I had recently was being on the winning team in a pub quiz in a London club.’
    • ‘To add to the excitement, a children's entertainer, competitions, quizzes and refreshments were included in the morning's entertainment.’
    • ‘And there's a quiz testing your knowledge of the shuttle program's 24-year history.’
    • ‘I've always been a whiz at quizzes - I've won countless pub quizzes and company competitions, as well as a national quiz contest as a child.’
    • ‘On Monday, the farmhands were tested on their agricultural knowledge in a farmyard quiz.’
    • ‘The teams were chosen by means of a quiz with the individuals gaining the highest scores in each age group successfully making the team.’
    • ‘It is where I went to school, go to Church, sometimes shop, am involved in a pub quiz team, and where I stood twice in District Council elections.’
    • ‘With a total of 80 questions, the fundraising quiz tests local knowledge covering everything from local history to culture and sport in the area.’
    • ‘Seven teams from around the Diocese competed in the quiz.’
    • ‘At the end of your journey you can test your knowledge with a short quiz.’
    • ‘Then on the following Wednesday, December 5, there'll be a quiz night for teams of four.’
    • ‘For the first time in many years we have a quiz team in the final.’
    • ‘This chap was a quiz-show fanatic who had won a national quiz competition when he was a child.’
    • ‘Even the quiz competition focussed on nutrition and health.’
    • ‘People will be able to test their general knowledge at a quiz night.’
    test of knowledge, competition, panel game, quiz game, quiz show
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1British informal An act of questioning someone.
      ‘judges face gay sex scandal quiz’
    2. 1.2North American An informal written test or examination given to students.
      • ‘The student may review the quiz to see which questions were missed, and is then directed to the lesson chapter from which the question was taken.’
      • ‘Over the course of the semester, students take 13 weekly quizzes and the highest 10 count in their course grade.’
      • ‘The school offers end of chapter quizzes as well as examinations.’
      • ‘Students are assessed through three problem-solving quizzes and three multiple-choice examinations.’
      • ‘From the start to the end of the semester, students took the online quizzes 1,735 times, which correlated to 77 percent of the class taking every available quiz.’
      • ‘They show that most approaches to using on-line tests, quizzes, and other evaluations suffer from increased student willingness to cheat.’
      • ‘Authors reported that students demonstrated increased achievement on quizzes and improved interest and engagement.’
      • ‘Examinations should be given routinely and include simple quizzes, a midterm examination, and a final examination.’
      • ‘In addition to the daily quizzes, student learning was evaluated by three in-class examinations and a final presentation by each student of an article to the entire class.’
      • ‘The majority of users were course directors, and they were the ones primarily responsible for developing quizzes and examinations.’
      • ‘The quiz serves to evaluate students' knowledge of medication indications, dosages, monitoring, and side effects.’
      • ‘To evaluate understanding of lecture content, students took weekly quizzes.’
      • ‘The highest rated features included communication among students and faculty, online graded quizzes, and the self-study feature with the option to work on the compact disk at home.’
      • ‘The coordinating Web site offers detailed written explanations, hands-on activities, resources and computer-graded quizzes.’
      • ‘The students who were present for all three quizzes had significantly higher overall test scores than other students.’
      • ‘One of the things that my students get the most use from are the interactive quizzes that I have written to help them study for the tests.’
      • ‘The instructor uses this website to post supplementary information and online quizzes.’
      • ‘The computer shuts down students' access to quizzes or activities after the deadlines pass.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Ask (someone) questions.

    ‘four men have been quizzed about the murder’
    • ‘He is being quizzed by murder squad detectives.’
    • ‘It seems only 14 per cent of those quizzed said they felt guilty using the Internet at work for personal reasons.’
    • ‘A study quizzed 1,000 UK shoppers of both sexes and all ages.’
    • ‘Why can't the paper just say that a suspect is being questioned, rather than quizzed?’
    • ‘Two in five of those quizzed reckon their IT department will prevent them from falling victim to threats such as spyware and phishing.’
    • ‘Children have been firing questions to their new friends by email, quizzing them on how long it takes to get to class and what a typical school meal is made up of.’
    • ‘Eight-four per cent of organisations quizzed in a survey out today blamed human error ‘either wholly or in part’ for their last major security breach.’
    • ‘Sixty per cent of the women quizzed for the study said they thought they would hit a glass ceiling in their own career, and apparently 31 per cent of employers agreed.’
    • ‘During the session, prosecution lawyers quizzed customs officers from Tokyo Airport with 91 questions.’
    • ‘Police have been granted an extra 24 hours to quiz a man in connection with the murder.’
    • ‘The poll quizzed south-east Londoners on what they treasure most and least about the UK, in an attempt to find out what the UK's national treasure is.’
    • ‘Teachers in Hull will be quizzed about their pupils' bad behaviour in a survey into classroom violence.’
    • ‘They found that those interviewed on Friday appeared significantly happier than those quizzed at the beginning of the week.’
    • ‘According to the survey, bosses thought the most effective method of reducing absence was ‘return to work’ interviews, whereby a returning employee is quizzed about the illness.’
    • ‘Almost half of firms quizzed said they would be interested to use it to market their own products and services.’
    • ‘Detectives have quizzed pupils in relation to the attack.’
    • ‘Our survey also found that 75 per cent of those quizzed knew three or more of their neighbours.’
    • ‘But when he was quizzed about the murder, he told police the victim had ‘impaled himself’ on the knife when he took it out of his college folder to try to avoid being beaten up.’
    • ‘By contrast, only 10 per cent quizzed during the poll identified malicious hackers as the largest threat to security.’
    • ‘Detectives have been given extra time to quiz a murder suspect over the fatal stabbing of a Swindon man.’
    question, interrogate, put questions to, probe, sound out, interview, examine, cross-examine, catechize
    grill, put the screws on, pump, give someone the third degree, put someone through the third degree, put someone through the mangle, put someone through the wringer, worm something out of someone
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1North American Give (a student or class) an informal written test or examination.
      • ‘Along the way, the automatic tutor would quiz the student and respond to questions, much as a human tutor does.’
      • ‘There was only a fifty percent chance that they'd actually get quizzed on the material tomorrow, but she couldn't chance it.’
      • ‘The entire course consists of ten booklets that teach a skill, then quiz the student on information recently learned.’
      • ‘One part of the exams was an oral test where pupils were quizzed by two professors of the institution.’
      • ‘It gives an overview of British society and history and devotes chapters to the eight topics that candidates will be quizzed on in the test.’
      • ‘The teacher has handed out worksheets describing the weapons and siege engines which could have been used, and she is quizzing pupils about them.’

Origin

Mid 19th century (as a verb; originally US): possibly from quiz, influenced by inquisitive.

Pronunciation:

quiz

/kwɪz/

Main definitions of quiz in English

: quiz1quiz2

quiz2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]Archaic
  • 1Look curiously or intently at (someone) through or as if through an eyeglass.

    ‘deep-set eyes quizzed her in the candlelight’
  • 2Make fun of.

    ‘is it possible he has heard of my foible and is quizzing me?’

noun

Archaic
  • 1A practical joke or hoax.

    ‘I am impatient to know if the whole be not one grand quiz’
    1. 1.1A person who ridicules or hoaxes another.
      ‘she would brave the ridicule with which it pleased the quizzes to asperse the husband chosen for her’
  • 2An odd or eccentric person.

    ‘she means to marry that quiz for the sake of his thousands’

Origin

Late 18th century: sometimes said to have been invented by a Dublin theatre proprietor who, having made a bet that a nonsense word could be made known within 48 hours throughout the city, and that the public would give it a meaning, had the word written up on walls all over the city. There is no evidence to support this theory.

Pronunciation:

quiz

/kwɪz/