Main definitions of quiver in English

: quiver1quiver2

quiver1

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 Tremble or shake with a slight rapid motion:

    ‘the tree's branches stopped quivering’
    ‘Juliet's lower lip quivered’
    • ‘The flame quivered a little more then went out.’
    • ‘Swung around the head by a string they produce quivering vibrations in the air and have particular significance for initiation rites.’
    • ‘And it was a relief when Jude swung the steel-hooked gaffing pole over the side, and hauled on board a solid, quivering muscle of a fish.’
    • ‘She was met with the tip of a black sword quivering centimeters away from her nose.’
    • ‘I loved the way that the stage just transformed itself with quivering strands of material.’
    • ‘At the microscopic level of nature, everything is vibrant - sap flowing, leaves and blades of grass quivering in the wind - but the eye can hardly see them.’
    • ‘I used to love doing that, jumping feet first into quivering mountains of brown and red, kicking my way through the gutters where the leaves collected best.’
    • ‘She brought the feather up to look at it and it quivered in the slight breeze.’
    • ‘The leaves shook and quivered.’
    • ‘You are instantly transported into an enchanting vista of cool water-filled ponds that quiver and shimmer with shadows that change with the time of day.’
    • ‘We also have the species Astrantia major with green flowers filled with pinkish stamen which quiver in the slightest of breezes.’
    • ‘The earth shook and quivered underfoot.’
    tremble, shake, shiver, quaver, quake, shudder, convulse
    flutter, agitate, vibrate, flap, beat
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[with object] Cause (something) to make a slight rapid motion:
      ‘the bird runs along in a zigzag path, quivering its wings’
      • ‘Some of the images here caused even this reviewer to quiver a jaded eyebrow.’
      • ‘The female continued to give the high-pitched call and quiver her wings for another 20 seconds.’
      • ‘Her eyes were closed, and she was quivering her lips like an opera singer, though it wasn't affecting her singing at all.’
      • ‘At over 350 quid the boss is likely to quiver his bottom lip but my mind is made up, I want one.’
      • ‘Joe is ready to bail out of EastEnders and try his hand at something other than quivering his bottom lip and having bad facial hair.’
      • ‘He quivers his right foot and steers the discussion to the counseling programs he has supported for war veterans.’
      • ‘We'd pulled the car up on the hills east of Rosedale and three yards the other side of the glass a cold wind quivered a lapwing's crest.’

noun

  • A slight trembling movement or sound, especially one caused by a sudden strong emotion:

    ‘she couldn't help the quiver in her voice’
    • ‘There's just something in that voice, that slight quiver that lets you know he isn't hiding behind anything.’
    • ‘Steel and acoustic guitars, fiddles, banjo, piano, accordion, harmonica, brass and upright bass create a bulbous, classic sound haunted by the quivers of musical saws and other alien devices.’
    • ‘He sounded calm, but I caught a quiver in his voice.’
    • ‘Yes, it was strictly the challenge that appealed to him, he told himself, ignoring a sudden quiver of breath.’
    • ‘He tried to keep his tone matter-of-fact and business-like, but he couldn't completely hide the quiver of emotion as he spoke of leaving her.’
    • ‘Although she had intended to sound indignant, the quiver in her voice betrayed the chuckle she was controlling.’
    • ‘The only indication was the slight quiver of his upper lip as his eyes bore into James.’
    • ‘I noticed a slight quiver in the man's lips, and to my surprise, he dropped his gun, staggered away, and collapsed to his knees.’
    • ‘The anger in her face could make the bravest man in the world quiver in fear.’
    • ‘Amy's voice filled the room, a slight, underlying quiver in her tone, as if she didn't want to hear more.’
    • ‘I silently cursed myself for the quiver in my voice.’
    • ‘She said, louder this time, and with a quiver in her voice.’
    • ‘His face was calm, but the slight quiver in his words betrayed him.’
    • ‘She was proud of herself for keeping the quiver from her voice.’
    • ‘Her hands trembled, a fine quiver that rippled through her body.’
    • ‘He had noticed her shaking and the slight quiver in her voice as she finished her story.’
    • ‘Her body froze as she saw the words, the words that made her quiver with fear.’
    • ‘He ignored the slight quiver in his voice; after all, these English rooms echoed so oddly.’
    tremor, tremble, shake, shaking, shakiness, shiver, frisson, chill, vibration, quaver, quake, shudder, flutter, oscillation, fluctuation, waver, ripple, falter
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from Old English cwifer ‘nimble, quick’. The initial qu- is probably symbolic of quick movement (as in quaver and quick).

Pronunciation:

quiver

/ˈkwɪvə/

Main definitions of quiver in English

: quiver1quiver2

quiver2

noun

  • 1An archer's portable case for holding arrows.

    • ‘In the center was an enormous longbow with a quiver of arrows beside it on its own peg.’
    • ‘Smoothly, he drew another arrow from the quiver and nocked it to the bow.’
    • ‘Around the archer's waist and legs were 15 arrowheads, suggesting that a quiver of hafted arrows had been scattered over his lower body and legs, but the bow had long since rotted away.’
    • ‘A tall woman stomped into the clearing, holding a longbow and a quiver of arrows.’
    • ‘A yew longbow rested on his shoulder; the hawk feather fletched arrows were in the quiver on the other.’
    • ‘She unstrung it and put the bowstring in a pouch at her belt, and found a quiver and arrows with black fletching.’
    • ‘Lying at their feet were two new swords and a crossbow complete with a full quiver of arrows.’
    • ‘All carried longbows and a quiver full of arrows behind their backs.’
    • ‘She dressed in green and carried a longbow and a quiver of arrows on her back.’
    • ‘Archers drew their arrows from their quivers and readied to fire.’
    • ‘Joshua could make out that while some archers carried one quiver of arrows, many carried up to three.’
    • ‘He carried a small longbow and a quiver of arrows over his back.’
    • ‘Slung across her back was a large crossbow and quiver of arrows.’
    • ‘He carried a longbow and a quiver of arrows and a sword-belt was at his side, although no sword was visible.’
    • ‘These include the bow and the basic accessories hunters need, such as a sight, quiver and arrow rest.’
    • ‘His sword was sheathed, and his arrows still in their quiver.’
    • ‘Archers quickly exhausted quiver after quiver of arrows from their yew longbows.’
    • ‘He also had a framed backpack, a utility belt containing tools, a quiver containing 14 arrows, a flint dagger and most amazing of all, a copper axe.’
    • ‘At the time of his death, Otzi was carrying an unfinished longbow, a quiver of unfinished arrows and a backpack.’
    • ‘I packed my quiver full of arrows along with my armguard and left the palace.’
    1. 1.1 A set of surfboards of different lengths and shapes for use with different types of waves:
      ‘he had created a whole new quiver of boards specifically for Hawaii’
      • ‘Sure it would be great if we all rode a quiver of all kinds of boards and had a magazine focussing on the whole of surfing and not individual parts, but the chances is slim.’
      • ‘Now I need a wetsuit and a surfboard… bummer I didn't bring over at least one board from my quiver in NZ with me.’
      • ‘No need to bring your own surfboard; the Cascade travels with a diverse quiver of more than 60 boards.’
      • ‘That quiver idea sounds so simple and good: have a board for several ranges of wave size and conditions.’

Phrases

  • an arrow in the quiver

    • One of a number of resources or strategies that can be drawn on or followed:

      ‘improving communication is another arrow in the quiver that prison officers and staff have’

Origin

Middle English: from Anglo-Norman French quiveir, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch koker and German Köcher.

Pronunciation:

quiver

/ˈkwɪvə/