Definition of quid pro quo in English:

quid pro quo

noun

  • A favour or advantage granted in return for something.

    ‘the pardon was a quid pro quo for their help in releasing hostages’
    • ‘The American government reached similar quid pro quos with France and Russia, involving oil contracts as well as telecommunications deals.’
    • ‘Such an approach might still allow real limitations, especially to fight the quid pro quos, or the appearance thereof, that are associated with five- and six-figure contributions.’
    • ‘Our duty is to make Hong Kong a better place for us all, without hidden agendas or quid pro quos.’
    • ‘Regulators step up punishments for firms that cross the line into illegal behavior, while long-acceptable practices now are derided as unseemly quid pro quos.’
    • ‘It does seem, however, that the deal entails some interesting quid pro quos.’
    • ‘Negotiate in good faith first, and look at quid pro quos (such as aquaculture licenses), rather than using the hammer of forcible acquisition.’
    • ‘And I think the question, also, that we have to look at is, what kind of quid pro quos are made to have a coalition like this?’
    • ‘Until last year, I would have insisted public radio stations were immune from quid pro quos.’
    • ‘That was indiscreet, but you'd have to be very naïve not to imagine that there are a lot of implicit quid pro quos out there.’
    • ‘Finally, quid pro quos and veiled threats were utilized in an attempt to persuade.’
    • ‘The flurry of quid pro quos and dirty deals has all the dignity of mobsters divvying up the spoils.’
    • ‘Some investment bankers exacted kickbacks and other quid pro quos from clients who got shares.’
    • ‘Behind the scenes, the tacitly understood tradeoffs amount to quid pro quos.’
    exchange, trade, trade-off, swap, switch, barter, substitute, substitution, reciprocity, reciprocation, return, payment, remuneration, amends, compensation, indemnity, recompense, restitution, reparation, satisfaction
    requital
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (denoting a medicine substituted for another): Latin, something for something.

Pronunciation:

quid pro quo

/ˌkwɪd prəʊ ˈkwəʊ/