Main definitions of quid in English

: quid1quid2

quid1

noun

British
informal
  • One pound sterling.

    ‘we paid him four hundred quid’
    • ‘I for one would be prepared to pay up to a quid and not a penny more.’
    • ‘But small amounts - a couple of quid here, a few pence there - can add up quite quickly.’
    • ‘You pay forty quid a month to watch advertising you also pay for.’
    • ‘He was fined seventy quid and given fifty pounds costs against him.’
    • ‘Well done everyone, it was the best five quid I have spent in a long time.’
    • ‘I said that a customer is somebody who pays for goods or services, and if he wanted any more input from me it would cost him five quid a word.’
    • ‘For a modest two quid you get a glass of wine or a soft drink too.’
    • ‘Watch this space to see how the three hundred and fifty pound camera compares with the thirty quid webcam.’
    • ‘Many banks will let you open a high-interest savings account with just a quid.’
    • ‘Save yourself a couple of quid a week by reading them online instead.’
    • ‘If you drop a pound into the collecting box of a registered charity, that's all it gets - one shiny quid.’
    • ‘Is there anybody out there who still fancies putting a quid on a horse this morning?’
    • ‘However, the owner refused to pay me more than two quid an hour, and even I had standards.’
    • ‘Its spending power may have decreased, but you can still pick up bargains for a quid.’
    • ‘The brushes I'd found were a cheap, bargain lot I picked up in Swansea for a couple of quid some time last year.’
    • ‘If you've ever wondered why a small tub of hummus costs around a quid you should try making it yourself.’
    • ‘It cost me fifty quid, or about seventy-five US dollars and I was happy to pay it.’
    • ‘I was twenty four at the time, and I hadn't yet paid back a single penny of the three thousand quid he lent me to buy my first car.’
    • ‘The lodger has moved out, leaving me three hundred quid a month short.’
    pound sterling, £
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Phrases

  • make a (quick) quid

    • informal Earn money.

      ‘he made a quid playing golf’
      • ‘Australia has one of the most globalised western economies in the world but have the stampede of foreign investors actually made a quid Down Under?’
      • ‘It was uncomfortable and crowded because the captain or the first mate was making a quid on the side by carrying more passengers than manifested.’
      • ‘The miners who'll dig the stuff up will make a quid, of course.’
      • ‘This longstanding way of making a quid for the smarties is now being sort of retailed to ordinary people who don't really understand it and don't understand the risks that they're running.’
      • ‘I drive a taxi for a living and am stuggling to make a quid.’
      • ‘I settled on a quiet life teaching English and history to make a quid.’
      • ‘The good thing about that development was it is a great example that developers just don't come in, want to make a quick quid, and get out.’
      • ‘With unemployment so low and everyone working longer and harder to make a quid, it seems no-one's got any time left to show the next generation the ropes.’
      • ‘I reckon the silly buggers believe us and think they can make a quid!’
      • ‘You've got a smallish reading public and to make a quid you have to zero your magazine fairly precisely.’
  • not the full quid

    • informal Not very intelligent.

  • quids in

    • informal In a position where one has profited or is likely to profit from something.

      ‘put your brain power to the test—you could be quids in with a cash prize’
      • ‘Bargain hunters have been cashing in big-time on a discount bonanza which has left them quids in at the check-outs.’
      • ‘The more sceptical claimed the council would be quids in by selling off the old school site, but no, that had nothing to do with it - it was purely a matter of space, said the council.’
      • ‘I thought that if you were a woman you were quids in.’
      • ‘Keeping on top of dates which must not be missed and putting a little thought into finances will pay off, hopefully leaving you quids in come the end of December.’
      • ‘However, those who took advantage of the fixed-rate deals on offer before the upward movement are quids in.’
      • ‘While novelists rely solely on the revenue from book sales, songwriters, in theory, can still be quids in even without a solitary record being sold.’
      • ‘In areas where purchase prices are cheap, but high student numbers keep rents high, they will be quids in by subsidising their offspring through higher education if they buy a house to let out to others at the college.’
      • ‘If Premiership status is achieved, they'll be quids in.’
      • ‘If there's ever a call for that kind of skill in the cut-throat world of international communications, I'll be quids in.’
      • ‘As long as the share price rises, and for that there is no guarantee, then staff should be quids in, as long as they stay with the bank.’
      thriving, doing well, prospering, buoyant, expanding, flourishing, successful, strong, vigorous, productive, profitable, booming, burgeoning, fruitful, roaring, golden, palmy
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Origin

Late 17th century (denoting a sovereign): of obscure origin.

Pronunciation

quid

/kwɪd/

Main definitions of quid in English

: quid1quid2

quid2

noun

  • A lump of tobacco for chewing.

    • ‘I rehydrated the dried leaves and rolled up three quids.’
    • ‘Aagaard recorded that some of the crewmen traded fossils for tobacco, quoting them as saying, ‘What were fossils good for when you had Navy cut and juicy quids?’’
    • ‘Almost all habitual chewers use tobacco with or without the betel quid.’
    twist, plug, chew
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Origin

Early 18th century: variant of cud.

Pronunciation

quid

/kwɪd/