Main definitions of quant in English

: quant1quant2

quant1

noun

Finance
informal
  • ‘quants use computers to tell them what to buy and sell’
    • ‘And you have to get past his reputation within the industry as the ultimate quant jock, the by-the-numbers boss who supposedly wants to measure everything with spreadsheets, and base all decisions on data, not judgment or instinct.’
    • ‘In this market of memes, anyone can be a broker, analyst or quant with the right skills and desire - and the right moment of entry.’
    • ‘For a guy with a mostly technical / quant predilection, I did a lot of pure fundamental research.’
    • ‘First, a few numbers for the quant lurking in all of us.’
    • ‘In short, a quant combs through price ratios and mathematical relationships between companies or trading vehicles in order to divine profitable trading opportunities.’
    • ‘Well-paid quants build their massive multi-variable models and Monte Carlo simulators only to have them riddled with a thousand random bullet holes from the real world.’
    • ‘Mangione is a quant, which means that his stock picks are based more on quantitative measures of company and stock performance than on the underlying businesses.’
    • ‘As one of Wall Street's leading quants, Derman did throw off some intense gamma radiation.’
    • ‘Just talking to a friend, I said that last night at a party, I'd bumped into an old friend who's a quant.’
    • ‘Product innovation: define and write new payoffs with sales, traders and quants (pro-active and reactive), participate in the study of the risk management of the new payoffs.’
    • ‘This demand for quants has led to the creation of specialized Masters and PhD courses in mathematical finance, computational finance, and/or financial reinsurance.’
    • ‘Was it the quants who failed to imagine how big price distortions could get across all markets when liquidity evaporates?’
    • ‘Another useful S&P stat in the quant section is the Earnings & Dividend Rank, which rates stocks from A + to D on their earnings growth and stability over the past 10 years.’
    • ‘John Meriwether and his quants believed that they had, for practical purposes, eliminated the uncertainty in market movements by quantifying risk as a function of the past volatility of a stock or bond price.’
    • ‘When quant jocks argue with each other, the usual response is for the better informed one to chuck a file full of data at the offender and say ‘you do the math’.’

Origin

1970s: abbreviation.

Pronunciation

quant

/kwɒnt/

Main definitions of quant in English

: quant1quant2

quant2

noun

British
  • A pole for propelling a barge or punt, especially one with a prong at the bottom to prevent it sinking into the mud.

    • ‘Or use the quant, a long, very long, punting pole wielded against the soft mud of the bottom like a knight's lance.’
    • ‘The greater the angle made between the quant and the barge or punt, the greater the turning angle.’
    • ‘Punting technique: a punt pole is technically called a quant.’
    • ‘That’s when you take down the mast and use a long pole (or quant) to punt the boat under bridges, including the notoriously low medieval one at Potter Heigham.’
    • ‘As the unwieldy quant is about ten feet long and made from heavy, stout oak, it will usually be stored as far away from the river as possible.’

Origin

Late Middle English: perhaps from Latin contus, from Greek kontos ‘boat pole’.

Pronunciation

quant

/kwant/