Definition of pussycat in English:

pussycat

noun

informal
  • 1A cat.

    • ‘Tildy the pussycat is in a bit of a flap after these fluffy ducklings decided to set up home - in her fur!’
    • ‘Along the way, he disturbs three sleeping pussycats.’
    • ‘If you did not like pictures of cuddly teddies and pussycats when you were carefree and childless, there is no good reason for you to like them now.’
    • ‘Well look out boys because when my little pussycat started doing that I had him altered the very next day.’
    • ‘It was spotted in a garden in Upper Rosses playing with two friendly pussycats.’
    • ‘He did cute tinted drawings of pussycats, cupids, flowers and ladies' boots, with texts in a kind of ornamental handwriting.’
    • ‘It's more of a scarred old tomcat than a pussycat, but deserves a mention nonetheless.’
    • ‘From my third floor window, I watch pussycats patrolling their domain.’
    • ‘Doctors talk of such cancers as being either pussycats or aggressive and invasive tigers.’
    • ‘So what if pussycats and tigers originate from the same species?’
    • ‘Today, the tigress is a pussycat, with occasional claws.’
    • ‘You see ingenious ways to turn the wildcats at work into pussycats.’
    • ‘But when her sweet, sensitive side comes out, she's as gentle as a pussycat.’
  • 2A gentle, mild-mannered, or easy-going person.

    ‘he may look scary, but people assure us he's really a pussycat’
    • ‘In fact, of all the sweet, helpless little pussycats I've known in my life, hubby Rick has to top the list.’
    • ‘He finds Berkoff a pussycat to work with, despite his fearsome reputation.’
    • ‘And despite her feisty on-screen image, she is a pussycat with a heart of gold, according to Tabby.’
    • ‘Martin may have been vilified, but with his greying hair and creaky limbs, he is a pussycat in comparison to triggerhappy Barras.’
    • ‘As long as it's there, she doesn't try to get away with anything and she's a pussycat.’
    • ‘Having branded the Lions as pussycats last weekend, New Zealand's Sunday papers were back on familiar ground this morning.’
    • ‘If the people only knew him for the pussycat he is.’
    • ‘The kids today are like pussycats compared with what we used to be like.’
    • ‘The people on the other end of the phone when you have to call up to reactivate are going to be positive pussycats.’
    • ‘But underneath it all, Dickie is a pussycat, a real nice fellow, who passed some of the same human qualities on to his son.’
    • ‘Bob said: ‘He used to be quite a handful but now he's a pussycat.’’

Pronunciation:

pussycat

/ˈpʊsɪkat/