Main definitions of punt in English

: punt1punt2punt3punt4

punt1

noun

  • A long, narrow flat-bottomed boat, square at both ends and propelled with a long pole, used on inland waters chiefly for recreation.

    • ‘As Casper dunked one ball after another into the water on the 16th hole it was clear that the punt was about to pay-off in spectacular style.’
    • ‘You steer by pulling the quant through the water behind the punt.’
    • ‘A passerby on shore heard the cries for help, broke a window in a yacht club, grabbed a pair of oars, slipped a punt in the water and rowed out to where he heard the shouting.’
    • ‘The punt was finally brought ashore and laid upside down against a garden wall at our home in Cork.’
    • ‘The cup is for small punts with outboard motors of 10 hp or less.’
    • ‘I could hear the water lapping on the sides of my punt.’
    • ‘The pole of a punt is a dangerous weapon in the hands of the inexperienced, and as such pleasure crafts journey too far into the path into the path of our rowing heroes ‘bumps’ literally will occur.’
    • ‘Then we'd sit and watch all the punts and boats going by from morning to tea-time, playing a bit of football or baseball and fighting to get the best place on the rug.’
    • ‘We would anchor off and row ashore in the punt and have a picnic on the beach.’
    • ‘She and Ali sat in a tiny punt beneath the last dock, he fixing her with a stare thick with the promise of violence.’
    • ‘We were rammed once by an undergrad punting a whale of a barge of a punt, but everyone stayed in the punt, including, happily the guy attached to the punt pole - me.’
    • ‘The oil painting features a boy and girl on a punt on a waterway.’
    • ‘From early on, punts were used to ferry goods and passengers across but, with the building of the bridge, the trip became less hazardous.’
    • ‘The tarpon fishing was carried out in flat-bottomed punts called jon boats.’
    • ‘We understand that this equipment should never be used by people without Medical training and was therefore dangerous and totally useless in punts and small boats.’
    • ‘It was rather like trotting from a punt in traditional Thames style with the boat moored across the stream.’
    • ‘Where once the harbour might have had a currach or two tied up, the inlet is now festooned with yachts and dinghies and motor boats and punts of all shapes and sizes.’
    • ‘The punts come complete with mooring weights and paddles which are more than adequate in this non-tidal section of the Thames.’
    • ‘The team have drawn up a list of three potential sites for landing stages for the punts, the first at Castle Mill, the second at the Coppergate Centre, the third on the Hungate site.’
    • ‘I had no oars because I thought I could propel the punt with a primitive sail that I had assembled.’
    venture, speculation, risk, gamble
    View synonyms

verb

  • Travel or convey in a punt:

    [no object] ‘in summer you can enjoy punting along the river’
    • ‘In one picture, above, a couple and a friend are punted down the River Foss, with the magnificent Clifford's Tower in the background.’
    • ‘Two men would have worked the boat, punting it along.’
    • ‘Jamaica's lush interior is stunning, and the best way to see it is on a lazy river ride, being punted on your own personal bamboo raft.’
    • ‘You can build your own raft out of bamboo, and punt along the Klemin river or cruise down the Pimpin rivers by sampan.’
    • ‘Mention Oxford, and images of daydreaming dons and youths punting on the Cherwell come to mind.’
    • ‘The rowers turned their oars over to a blunt end they used to punt their craft along through the shallows to within five feet of the beach.’
    • ‘The last highlight of our trip was being punted along the River Welland by Ashley Hatton, a young man who had the idea for this unusual business last summer.’
    • ‘A variation of the first was to punt yourself along, feet pointing straight downward, gathering speed all the time by pushing off left and right.’
    • ‘Any doubts are fully confirmed shortly afterwards, when Ted and Sylvia go punting along the Cam and come to a field of cows.’
    • ‘Today, he was riding in it, punting along with a rubber ended broom handle, playing on the kazoo, and attempting to look like a gondola owner.’
    • ‘Each punt against the water pushed her farther aloft.’
    • ‘Sparkles of light danced off the lagoon as black-veiled women punted by in longboats.’
    • ‘I sat on a chair in the middle while Lemmy Nyambe punted us into the stream.’
    • ‘Canadian studies of skeletons reveal they may have had an inflatable sac inside their bodies which allowed them to float and punt along in shallow water.’
    • ‘The fishermen of Annamalaicheri village on Pulicat lake, punt their boats at dawn in winter.’
    • ‘Students have complained that the failure to use a picture of punting on the Cherwell is at odds with the Ball's claims to be an occasion which celebrates Oxford.’
    • ‘One evening in the summer we used to go punting up the river and have supper at the Green Man at Grantchester.’
    • ‘Lucy Boston was captivated by it when she first saw the Manor in 1915, while punting along the river with her brother.’

Origin

Old English, from Latin ponto, denoting a flat-bottomed ferry boat; readopted in the early 16th century from Middle Low German punte or Middle Dutch ponte ferry boat, of the same origin.

Pronunciation:

punt

/pʌnt/

Main definitions of punt in English

: punt1punt2punt3punt4

punt2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Soccer
    [with adverbial of direction] Kick (the ball) a long distance upfield:

    ‘the Leeds player kindly punted the ball back to them’
    • ‘Ten minutes later Foulger punted the ball upfield and Hoyle flicked it on for Jamie Longley to steer it in.’
    • ‘At the restart, Armoy fluffed the catch and Shane Hadden was there to punt the ball upfield.’
    • ‘Holland punts a ball upfield and into what appears to be a parallel universe, where Kevin Kilbane is able to beat his man and deliver a decent cross into the box.’
    • ‘West was singled out mainly because he kept punting the ball into the stands, hardly an unusual tactic when United had to win the game and were 2-in front.’
    • ‘The England players have shown in the recent past that they need no second invitation to begin hopelessly punting the ball forward into ‘good areas’.’
  • 2American Football Rugby
    Kick the ball after it has dropped from the hands and before it reaches the ground:

    ‘he used to be able to punt a football farther than anyone’
    [no object] ‘the Raiders could get nowhere with their possession, and had to punt’
    • ‘Peek beat his man and put a big hand on the football just as it was punted.’
    • ‘He mishandled multiple punts, so veteran Troy Edwards will handle punt returns Week 1 in Pittsburgh.’
    • ‘Even Michigan star receiver Marquise Walker has returned punts and blocked a punt this season.’
    • ‘At this rate, the Dolphins will have a punt or two blocked down the stretch.’
    • ‘Buchanan picked off his fifth punt that went for a first down.’

noun

  • An act of punting a ball:

    ‘Wood failed to cut out a long punt from Nicholas’
    • ‘After a wobbly period Chelsea fight back: a long punt forward nearly puts Gudjohnsen in, and then Gallas's 40-yard thumper bounces just past Kahn's post.’
    • ‘Two came in the form of special-teams meltdowns by Steelers, as a blocked field goal and a punt return both ended in Patriots touchdowns.’
    • ‘In his only season on the Packers in 1974, Hall-of-Famer Ted Hendricks blocked three field goals, three punts, and one extra point.’
    • ‘Crude punts into the home penalty box caused unbelievable problems and the Minstermen always looked vulnerable to counter-attacks.’
    • ‘Adebayor got his head to a long punt from the keeper.’
    • ‘We frequently conceded goals which were, frankly, hopeful punts from the opposing penalty area, which would roll limply into the goal as the defence fled in terror at the round white thing in their midst.’
    • ‘Lots of battling in midfield, then aimless punts forward to chase.’
    • ‘Palace almost paid the price for their profligacy, when Svensson and Roberts both flicked on a long punt and the ball fell invitingly for McKenzie just 12 yards out.’
    • ‘Between the two of them, the Texans would also have some flexibility as to who would return kickoffs and punts as both are capable in that department.’
    • ‘Kingston charges out of his box to head the ball clear as Ze Roberto tried to latch onto a hopeful punt from the back.’
    • ‘Toronto and Waterloo spent most of the first half exchanging the ball via punts and squandering opportunities.’
    • ‘Lonely dribbles from the half way line and big punts for Drogba to knock down seemed to be all they had to offer.’
    • ‘Aimless punts gave Macclesfield the ball with time and space to counter-attack - an invitation to which they readily responded - and carelessness in contact led to a series of turnovers.’
    • ‘They've had a couple of great punts, some good returns and a short touchdown run, but other than that, they haven't been making plays.’
    • ‘Ibrahimovic collects the ball from a big punt up the park.’
    • ‘He never makes a had snap and delivers the ball with great velocity on punts and place kicks.’
    • ‘It doesn't take much imagination to envision Evans returning kickoffs and punts as well.’
    • ‘Happe also served as the Beaver's long snapper on punts and placekicks.’
    • ‘He served as Hampton's primary kickoff returner and also returned punts on occasion.’
    • ‘Newman blocked two kicks as a junior and returned a blocked punt for a touchdown as a sophomore.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: probably from dialect punt ‘push forcibly’. Compare with bunt.

Pronunciation:

punt

/pʌnt/

Main definitions of punt in English

: punt1punt2punt3punt4

punt3

verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1 (in some gambling card games) lay a stake against the bank.

    • ‘On the first series of downs they found themselves in a fourth-and-one situation and were forced to punt.’
    • ‘Therefore, if you were punting with a stake of £2 per point, you would win 32 x £2 = £64.’
    bet, wager, gamble, stake, hazard, risk, chance, venture
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1British informal Bet or speculate on something:
      ‘investors are punting on a takeover’
      • ‘The Deutschmark will be dumped, the lire lost, the punt punted, and the franc will be well finished.’
      • ‘Presumably he's punting on the fact that the NT population has a very high turnover rate, and hoping that with a bit of luck even some of those who lived here in 2000 might have forgotten!’
      • ‘If it's not enough to have the working people punting on the horses and the pokies to fill the public coffers, now they want us to punt on the markets.’
      • ‘They are simply hedging their bets, forming a relationship with you early on, in a competitive industry and punting on your future success.’
      • ‘Depending on the odds, Sauber could be good value for an each-way punt at almost every grand prix.’
      • ‘A commission is a politician's way of punting on an issue, and in this case, it was also an admission of defeat.’
      • ‘In February this year, after being told no again, she took a punt and sent it to another company in New York.’
      • ‘The Supreme Court is punting on the military trials, at least for now, reports the Washington Post.’
      • ‘She's punting on the fact that the shares, despite the shortcomings of the company, offer some decent appreciation potential.’
      • ‘But there are much saner and sounder reasons for punting on the Andre Fabre-trained colt in the greatest all-aged race in Europe.’
      • ‘But there are still plenty of other ways to have some fun punting on the election result.’
      • ‘The company shake-up shows Singo's punting on a fourth network.’
      • ‘Other gamblers turned their attention to punting on the result of the negotiations between the union and the casino.’
      • ‘Unless luck is on your side, punting on problem firms leads only to heavy losses.’
      • ‘But the latest alarm is sounding over growing evidence that small investors are using consumer credit to fund punting on soaring technology shares.’
      • ‘In fact the recent run up in the share price, bore no resemblance to actual performance by the company in the latest half, except that investors were punting on a huge capital return instead of that bid.’
      • ‘It may no longer wield the musical power it did in the halcyon punk-rock 1970s, but the New Musical Express is still punting the best of Britain's young bloods on the live circuit.’
      • ‘If I had that famous penny for every time the Motley Fool's written about the nonsense of broker recommendations, then I'd be able to stop punting on tech shares.’
      • ‘Hence, this is a stock in which investors will need to display fair patience and understanding, rather than punting on overnight gains.’
      • ‘It loses four billion dollars punting on the currency.’
      bet, wager, place a bet, lay a bet, stake money on something, back the horses, try one's luck on the horses
      View synonyms

noun

British
informal
  • A bet:

    ‘those taking a punt on the company's success’
    • ‘Investors are taking a punt on what effectively is a shell company.’
    • ‘That said, his maverick tendencies are becoming almost a trademark of the man, and I'd wager a punt or two that he'll be courting controversy again before we next go to the polls.’
    • ‘Kitty Empire takes a punt on Eamon having a long career in front of him.’
    • ‘Likewise, what employer will risk taking a punt on a prospective employee with criminal convictions for racist activities?’
    • ‘The company is taking a punt with online betting in a bid to generate more revenue for the mass-market Internet Service Provider.’
    • ‘The traders took a punt on the yen in long-dated options between two and 10 years.’
    • ‘How is this inferior to people taking a punt on what they believe to be the next terrorist attack?’
    • ‘A huge betting market had taken punts on what she might wear, but it was the joint favourite - pink - which saw off the competition.’
    • ‘But his most fruitful gamble has been his punt on the technology behind the BSE test.’
    • ‘Currently, small investors are obstructed from taking a punt on these funds because they cannot be sold directly to the public.’
    • ‘However, Chez Panisse is so popular that the place is always booked out for at least a month in advance and therefore anybody going is taking a punt on what they'll get.’
    • ‘In a year that's seen home made reality shows crash and burn, I'm surprised they think this is worth taking a punt on.’
    • ‘Certainly not cutting edge (a couple of years old now) but perfect for what I wanted at a price that was worth taking a punt on.’
    • ‘May I endeavour to give the information that your Honours were asking in an exact form rather than taking a punt on it.’
    • ‘City gamblers normally take a punt on the movement of financial indices, such as the FT All Share, or the FTSE index of Britain's top 100 companies.’
    • ‘That's four out of five borrowers taking a punt on where interest rates are going.’
    • ‘These types of mortgages give the borrower the security of knowing their repayment will not change, but there is also a gamble because you are taking a punt on interest rates.’
    • ‘First time we met we talked gambling, every time we talk we discuss punts, so how is it going?’
    • ‘Is it worth taking a punt on the share price staying high, Rambus doing well, and Hyundai raking it in?’
    • ‘Without a guarantee from a multilateral agency, commercial banks are wary of taking a punt on a mega-project in communist Laos.’

Phrases

  • take (or have) a punt at

    • informal Attempt to do (something).

      • ‘Mystic Medusa tells all, and also takes a punt at some eminent personages, including the Pope and the Dalai Lama.’
      • ‘He didn't need to laugh at me as I failed to dispossess him, or to use his goalkeeper to run upfield to have a punt at goal.’
      • ‘Everyone's having a punt at shattering the race leader on the last real climb of the Tour.’

Origin

Early 18th century: from French ponte player against the bank, from Spanish punto a point.

Pronunciation:

punt

/pʌnt/

Main definitions of punt in English

: punt1punt2punt3punt4

punt4

noun

  • (until the introduction of the euro in 2002) the basic monetary unit of the Republic of Ireland, equal to 100 pence.

    • ‘The old punt is equal to one euro and twenty seven cent.’
    • ‘Caroline Keady, whose parents live in Withington, changed a fistful of old Irish punts into euros before flying.’
    • ‘We were looking at numbers on the screen with no way of telling whether they were in punts or euros.’
    • ‘How retailers convert their prices from punts to euro is also being closely monitored.’
    • ‘Our customers are arriving in with both punts and euro, but it is not a problem.’
    • ‘John Bee presented a well-laid out treasurer's report that started in punts and ended in Euro.’
    • ‘Westport's transition from punts to euro has gone smoothly for the first week, according to some of the large retailers in town.’
    • ‘Having ditched the punt for the euro, the Irish are more concerned about Central Bank interest rates than shenanigans at Stormont.’
    • ‘In January 2002 the euro replaced the Irish punt, which in 1928 had replaced the British pound before it.’
    • ‘Farmers, in particular, will need to have a good understanding of the value of the euro relative to the punt, as they will be buy sell stock and produce and buy livestock, fuel and other inputs in euros.’
    • ‘As testimony to its success, a total of £625.75 stg, 324.19 euro and £20 punts was raised.’
    • ‘Since the changeover from punts to euro in 2002 local shopkeeper John Harrison set himself a goal to raise as much funds as he could for two charities.’
    • ‘There will be a six week period when we will have dual currency, when the punt and the euro will be in circulation.’
    • ‘He said that consumers should be allowed to change their punts into euros in late December, to avoid chaos at banks and ATM's from January 1.’
    • ‘There were also blushes in the court services when it became clear that several criminal summonses had not been served because the stamp duty on them had been paid before Christmas, in punts rather than euros.’
    • ‘The change over from the punt to the Euro seems to be going smoothly around the country.’
    • ‘A computer or printer may be originally priced for the world market in dollars or sterling and translated into punts say, once every six months.’
    • ‘People can change their punts to Euro at the bar and then pay for all drinks in Euro, as everything will be priced in Euro.’
    • ‘Department stores can expect to find themselves in the eye of the storm as the switch from punts to euros will coincide with the post-Christmas sales.’
    • ‘Francs, Deutschmarks, guilders, punts, drachmas and pesetas will all have gone by the end of February.’

Origin

Irish, literally pound.

Pronunciation:

punt

/pʌnt/