Definition of punch-up in English:

punch-up

noun

British
informal
  • A disorderly bout of fighting with the fists; a brawl.

    ‘Casey and his mother's lover are to appear in court after a punch-up’
    figurative ‘there could be a few punch-ups with Britain's farmers’
    • ‘At school we used to side with a few mates around the school yards and have a few punch-ups or fights after school, but they weren't like the gang-related fights of today.’
    • ‘After a series of punch-ups at posh events in Manchester, they have been chastised by their industry's own magazine.’
    • ‘As with most playground punch-ups, this bystander does not much care who started it.’
    • ‘I came down to watch Biggar against Peebles recently and eight punch-ups later I thought this is not like Glasgow rugby.’
    • ‘There's a feeling the town centre can be a nasty place with a lot of punch-ups going on, but there are many young people just enjoying themselves and having a drink.’
    • ‘A West Coast-Borders derby without venom and tumult is about as common as a punch-up in chess.’
    • ‘The Scotland camp, it was claimed, was riven by punch-ups among its own players and ill-disciplined drinking bouts.’
    • ‘The record doesn't want you to just kick back and listen, preferring to taunt you from your chair via head-nodding blues punch-ups and brawling rock 'n' roll.’
    • ‘But in the case of a deposit row, a tenancy deposit scheme does seem like a better way to sort out a punch-up than, well, a punch-up.’
    • ‘Policing and legislation forced the real ‘firms’ to arrange their punch-ups hundreds of miles from football grounds.’
    • ‘The stage was set for one of the biggest punch-ups in Australian corporate history.’
    • ‘I'm an emotional wreck due to all the talk of boarding schools, punch-ups, tantrums, and love.’
    • ‘Police predict 800-plus attacks, woundings and punch-ups by the end of the year.’
    • ‘What I didn't see were drunks, body fluids, punch-ups and verbal abuse.’
    • ‘‘We didn't have drunks or punch-ups,’ adds Brenda.’
    • ‘Several minutes of disorder ensued, which included punch-ups and the Oxford goalkeeper apparently pinning a rather more bulky Warwick team member to the ground saying repeatedly ‘Who's my bitch now?’’
    • ‘Keighley used to have that perception of being somewhere to come on a Friday or a Saturday night and have a punch-up.’
    • ‘What a pity they never met, quarrelled and had a public punch-up.’
    • ‘For all the giant leaps and superhuman punch-ups, jokes and quips, he manages to give a quite touching layered performance.’
    • ‘You often see people getting out of their cars and starting punch-ups.’

Pronunciation:

punch-up

/ˈpʌntʃʌp/