Main definitions of pug in English

: pug1pug2pug3pug4

pug1

noun

  • 1A dog of a dwarf breed like a bulldog with a broad flat nose and deeply wrinkled face.

    • ‘Elsewhere in the house a rather ugly pug dog, a Masonic symbol, is painted on a ceiling.’
    • ‘We should cherish these glimpses of her as it won't be long before she goes to ground again, squirrelling away in her Manhattan apartment or the Virginia bolt-hole she shares with two pugs and a Boston terrier.’
    • ‘How did wolves transform into today's greyhounds, pugs, and Yorkies?’
    • ‘Raven had long, greasy mouse-brown hair and a nose like a pug.’
    • ‘Maybe my experience with bringing other dogs into the house with our first pug will help you.’
    • ‘The pug's miniaturized ‘bulldog’ lineaments rendered it not just fashionable in the late eighteenth century but - at a period of war with France - patriotic.’
    • ‘The woman goes inside and comes back with a pug dog wheezing on the end of a red leash.’
    • ‘We kept a pug and a little Pomeranian and a Maltese, and gave my parents a little poodle.’
    • ‘As secretary of the Pugalug Club, a group almost 500 strong throughout Ontario devoted to the health and well being of the pug dog breed, I can't help but feel a need to respond to your article, ‘Good, bad and Pugly’.’
    • ‘As much as they enjoy walking Jack Russells and pugs through a neighbourhood with a taste of history, they also realize that this flavour is a commodity which inflates the value of their condos.’
    • ‘Others claim the bulldog resulted from the crosses between mastiffs and Dutch pug dogs.’
    • ‘Crossing a pug with a Pekingese, for example, could produce disastrous consequences.’
    • ‘Now Charles has a potential doppelgänger on this side of the Atlantic: a cute, mischievous little pug dog named Pugly.’
    • ‘The pug was the Dutch national dog, and soon it became a national sensation in England.’
    • ‘While the children were delighted by the presence of the smaller breeds like pugs and miniature pinscher, the body language of the grown-ups revealed a liking towards bigger breeds like great Danes and German shepherds.’
    • ‘With such strong words, it's no wonder that the mascot on the group's website is a mischievous little pug dog who's ready to lay down the law.’
    • ‘The girls see an ugly little dog, you know the ugly little pug dog, right?’
    • ‘This couple was waiting to board the plane with their dog, a pug, who they had slung on the woman's chest in a baby carrier.’
    • ‘From the smallest pug breed to the tallest Great Dane weighing over 20 kg, there were about 35 breeds.’
    • ‘Surely a pug is no match for the loyalty of a spaniel?’
  • 2A small, slender moth which rests with its wings stretched out to the sides.

    • ‘The tiny lime-speck pug moth is common and widespread over much of Britain.’
    • ‘Green pug moth caterpillars have been found in Oxford County this month, showing that they have spread beyond their original coastal distribution.’

Origin

Mid 18th century: perhaps of Low German origin.

Pronunciation:

pug

/pʌɡ/

Main definitions of pug in English

: pug1pug2pug3pug4

pug2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1usually as adjective puggedWork (clay) into a soft, plastic condition suitable for making bricks or pottery, without air pockets:

    ‘bricks set in pugged clay’
    • ‘He had erected ‘a more substantial building of logs, pugged with clay’.’
    • ‘If we mix a fresh batch of clay from dry materials, whether it is pugged or wedged right afterwards it is still short.’
    • ‘The stiffness of the pugged clay will, of course, depend entirely upon the subsequent method of manufacture.’
  • 2usually as noun puggingPack (a space) with pug, sawdust, or other material in order to deaden sound:

    ‘old-fashioned pugging with dry sand cannot be carried out’
    • ‘The heavy (2.5kN / [m.sup.2]) roof of lead sheet pugging, membrane and oak ceiling boards, is supported by a composite truss of white American oak rafters, stainless-steel tie-rods and intermediate circular posts.’

noun

  • [mass noun] Pugged clay.

    • ‘The soil at Ilam is a heavy clay which is slightly acid, and is known as Ilam pug.’
    • ‘On either side of this wall, ‘pug’ clay was being rammed.’

Origin

Early 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

pug

/pʌɡ/

Main definitions of pug in English

: pug1pug2pug3pug4

pug3

noun

informal
  • A boxer:

    ‘a come-from-nowhere pug gets a shot at the heavyweight title’
    • ‘Because no one outside the insular world of boxing can name one pug that he has under contract.’
    • ‘Holyfield's boxing licence was removed but old pugs never seem to learn, and he wants to fight again.’
    • ‘The boxer has always included a diet of pugs and lower level fighters among his opponents.’
    • ‘Boxing drills aren't just for pugs anymore - they'll jump-start your fitness for mountain biking, paddling, climbing, and more.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: abbreviation of pugilist.

Pronunciation:

pug

/pʌɡ/

Main definitions of pug in English

: pug1pug2pug3pug4

pug4

noun

  • The footprint of an animal:

    [as modifier] ‘I saw the pug marks of the tigress in the soft earth’
    • ‘On spotting the pug marks of a tigress and three cubs, a cub walked into the booby trap laid by officials in the Nature Park opened opposite the zoo in September 2003.’
    • ‘I saw pug marks, droppings, I even heard them roar, but for four days I did not see a single lion.’
    • ‘I might have read a lot about the tiger, but may not be able to recognise its pug marks if I am left in a jungle.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Track (an animal) by its footprints.

    • ‘Grazing, pugging (hoof prints left in the mud) and wallowing by buffaloes previously prevented these plants from dominating or even establishing.’
    • ‘Since riparian areas are often wetter than the surrounding fields, they are most susceptible to trampling, soil compaction, and pugging.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Hindi pag footprint.

Pronunciation:

pug

/pʌɡ/