Definition of pucker in English:

pucker

verb

  • (especially with reference to a person's face) tightly gather or contract into wrinkles or small folds.

    [no object] ‘the child's face puckered, ready to cry’
    [with object] ‘the baby stirred, puckering up its face’
    ‘she puckered her lips’
    • ‘And then, one night, as I put my four year old to bed, I sat next to her and watched the slowing calm of her familiar breathing, her rounded cheeks and lips puckering in and out, as she lay in a cocooned slumber that only a child can know.’
    • ‘But ask not for whom the lips pucker, they pucker for thee.’
    • ‘His eyes opened wide and his lips puckered in a spit.’
    • ‘Lip lady is puckering fast and furious now and is just about to give up when a yellowed, wrinkled paper falls out from the pile she is holding.’
    • ‘Smokers often end up with telltale lines around their lips (created by repeated lip puckering while inhaling), but the damage doesn't stop there.’
    • ‘Ryan found himself smiling as he just watched her inhale and then exhale her dark red lips puckering and then opening wide.’
    • ‘The cherry lips puckered and the brows drew together as she struggled to remember, and I smiled slightly.’
    • ‘Livi's neighbor's brow puckered thoughtfully as she read the instructor's criticisms.’
    • ‘Again my fingers passed her lips and they puckered.’
    • ‘Use of thicker sheets in fully adhered membranes helps resist puckering and wrinkling.’
    • ‘Her lips puckered for a moment before breaking into a sneer.’
    • ‘His lips puckered and a short, sharp burst of air came forth.’
    wrinkle, crinkle, cockle, crumple, rumple, ruck up, scrunch up, corrugate, ruffle, screw up, crease, shrivel, furrow, crimp, gather, draw, tuck, pleat
    ruckle
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noun

  • A tightly gathered wrinkle or small fold.

    ‘a pucker between his eyebrows’
    • ‘Snug each stitch down just until it flattens to the surface; pulling the yarn too tight will create puckers.’
    • ‘After all, when you're a spy, what's most important is not to inform congressional overseers or educate the American people about intelligence - it's to keep your pucker.’
    • ‘Your permanent pucker deserves full points because it's just so cute!’
    • ‘Her fingers are as light as the puckers in her silks.’
    • ‘The eye asks if the green, frilled geranium puckers, clustered at angles on each stem, are similar enough to stop time.’
    • ‘High cheekbones and lips that always seemed to be on the cusp of a pucker.’
    • ‘She said this while pressing both sides of his cheeks in a grotesque pucker.’
    • ‘He told reporters at the weekend that the bulge was nothing more than a pucker along the jacket's seam when the president crossed his arms and leaned forward.’
    • ‘His bible-infused speeches have become as commonplace as his chimp-like pucker.’
    • ‘But sometimes we get frustrated by puckers at the point of the dart.’
    • ‘There's the sour pucker on a snow lynx, a soulful pout on a groundhog, and a demonic stare on a giant panda.’
    • ‘Any tea-stained paper may dry with puckers or curled edges.’
    • ‘The result is that once your quilt is washed, the fabrics will exert their own shrinking personality, and you will have a quilt that has puckers - and some patches will pucker more than others.’
    • ‘The stunned looks on the faces of the audience caused her to lose her pucker, proving that you can't whistle and laugh at the same time.’
    • ‘In the earliest stages of embryo development, when there are only a few cells and the embryo resembles a tiny globe of cells, a small pucker develops on one side of the embryo.’
    • ‘There you have it - a perfect pucker for any kiss.’
    • ‘His tailor was trotted out to say it was just a seam pucker.’
    • ‘Byrd brings her lessons to us in this book full of tips and exercises to perk up your pucker.’
    • ‘‘Thank you,’ says the bartender, who does pride himself on his perfect pucker.’
    • ‘Cording pintucks helps eliminate puckers and raises pintucks on heavier fabrics.’
    wrinkle, fold, crinkle, crumple, corrugation, furrow, line, gather, tuck, pleat
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (as a verb): probably frequentative, from the base of poke and pocket (suggesting the formation of small purse-like gatherings).

Pronunciation:

pucker

/ˈpʌkə/