Definition of property in English:

property

nounPlural properties

  • 1mass noun A thing or things belonging to someone; possessions collectively.

    ‘she wanted Oliver and his property out of her flat’
    ‘the stolen property was not recovered’
    • ‘The flamboyant loyalist has been accused of possessing and concealing criminal property.’
    • ‘Police are recommending charges of possessing stolen property, and break, enter and theft against the man.’
    • ‘Stop-and-search is conducted when officers have a reasonable suspicion that a person is carrying a weapon or stolen property.’
    • ‘When arrests were made stolen property was recovered that belonged to two victims of a robbery in the town centre.’
    • ‘And far too many have had their property stolen or vandalised.’
    • ‘She knew immediately that her mother was going to hound Ferdinand for the money, perhaps even possess his belongings or property.’
    • ‘She stole my company's property, which she knew very well belonged to me.’
    • ‘My art is still my art, but those characters are their property now.’
    • ‘Before fleeing the scene, after the 30-minute ordeal, the men stole property from the victims' handbags.’
    • ‘He also faces a charge of possessing stolen property in connection with the March 11 incident.’
    • ‘This series and its characters are my property and can only be used with my permission.’
    • ‘There are others who break into vehicles and steal other people's property and make residents feel unsafe in their own community.’
    • ‘People stole property because of suffering when the mine closed down.’
    • ‘Security coding property helps police identify and return stolen property to the owner.’
    • ‘Down the years we did hear from time to time that it was being planned to raise the wreck from the seabed and recover much valuable property.’
    • ‘I wonder if he knows his property is being stolen by fanatics?’
    • ‘They also found cash and stolen property at other properties connected to the defendants.’
    • ‘Generally, the more damage you do to property, or the more property you steal, the worse the punishment.’
    • ‘Valuable property was stolen, but worst of all was the trail of damage that was left behind.’
    • ‘Thousands of pounds worth of property have been stolen from properties on the outskirts of town in recent weeks.’
    possessions, belongings, things, goods, worldly goods, effects, personal effects, stuff, chattels, movables
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    1. 1.1 A building or buildings and the land belonging to it or them.
      ‘he's expanding now, buying property’
      count noun ‘the renovation of council properties’
      • ‘Many new properties also have characteristics apparently designed to discourage buyers.’
      • ‘It provides reinsurance coverage to the commercial property insurance market in Britain.’
      • ‘And this time is an exciting one in the commercial property market.’
      • ‘The fire had caused serious smoke and heat damage to the property, he said.’
      • ‘The derisory rates of interest have encouraged savers to play the stock market or buy property.’
      • ‘The loan was secured on their home, a former council property the couple had bought with their savings.’
      • ‘And few could argue that the asking purchase price was too high for the entire property - house and lands.’
      • ‘The figures are contained in the latest Land Registry report into property sales across the country.’
      • ‘We had no intention of destroying the character of the property and still we had problems.’
      • ‘The company said it had been hit by a continuing fall in stock markets around the world, the stalling of the commercial property market and low interest rates.’
      • ‘The index is formed by the prices of residential property, commercial property and land.’
      • ‘When the real estate market is down, both building owners and property managers look for new ways to save money.’
      • ‘Council tax bands are calculated on the size, age, character and locality of properties.’
      • ‘Forested wetlands on and around the property slow the water and soak it up.’
      • ‘A large window on the first landing over looks the garden and adds light and character to the property.’
      • ‘It was, they said, far too risky and was overexposed to the commercial property market.’
      • ‘We have gathered information on all of the commercial property owners in our market.’
      • ‘So maybe we have some areas outside of protected areas, on private property or council land, that could be set aside for those uses.’
      • ‘It claims this will give it the largest online selection of quality-checked properties in the UK.’
      • ‘Institutions are keen to buy commercial property that is rented on long-term leases, as it offers healthy returns.’
      building, buildings, premises, house, houses, land, estates, acres, acreage
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    2. 1.2properties Shares or investments in property.
      ‘properties ran into profit-taking, with Haslemere 176p’
      • ‘If successful, he is expected to dispose of several properties to pay down debt.’
      • ‘It is not mandatory that you take out a payment protection policy when purchasing investment properties.’
      • ‘Some women have invested in properties as part of their pension plan.’
      • ‘Estate agents have already reported increases in investment properties as a direct result of the budget.’
      • ‘It has already sold its citrus business in Florida and disposed of idle properties in California.’
    3. 1.3Law The right to the possession, use, or disposal of something; ownership.
      ‘rights of property’
      • ‘What we think of as property, as ownership, is about to change.’
      • ‘The second major element in communist doctrine was the social ownership of property and central planning of the economy.’
      • ‘One thing is clear: the general property or ownership in the items pledged remains vested in the pledgor.’
      • ‘Just because of the abuse of property ownership, private property should not altogether be eliminated.’
      • ‘But how were those notions of ownership and property understood in customary terms?’
    4. 1.4
      old-fashioned term for prop
  • 2An attribute, quality, or characteristic of something.

    ‘the property of heat to expand metal at uniform rates’
    • ‘Each of these states of matter is characterized by different physical properties.’
    • ‘This property may be attributed to its ability to diffuse in the reaction medium.’
    • ‘This property provides an ideal characteristic for the solubilization of many molecules.’
    • ‘For practical purposes the solar spectrum is divided into regions with characteristic properties.’
    • ‘The curative properties of mineral water have been known since ancient times.’
    • ‘These various healing properties are commonly attributed to the minerals dissolved in the water.’
    • ‘The types of bonds in minerals can affect the properties and characteristics of minerals.’
    • ‘They differ in their kinetic properties and expression characteristics throughout nodule development.’
    • ‘What functional characteristics or properties might such a technique probe?’
    • ‘The difference of water properties lies not only in their softness or hardness.’
    • ‘The water supposedly has healing properties, and some say it is the fountain of youth.’
    • ‘Yet, someone of strong will and character can override such properties and master the relic.’
    • ‘The characteristic property of membrane proteins is their intimate contact with lipids.’
    • ‘We speak of God's properties or attributes, and simplicity itself surely seems to be a property.’
    • ‘Evidently it imparts certain beneficial properties to the water.’
    • ‘Each special zone on the territory of the base has its special properties and attributes.’
    • ‘The higher negative charge is a property that seems to be characteristic of mitochondria in many cancer cells.’
    • ‘Many wells became famous and sought after and attributed with valuable properties.’
    • ‘That was of course assuming the properties and characteristics of materials and technology appropriate to the age.’
    • ‘The Bible does attribute the properties of life and death to both the plants and the lower animals.’
    quality, attribute, characteristic, feature, power, trait, mark, hallmark
    View synonyms

Origin

Middle English: from an Anglo-Norman French variant of Old French propriete, from Latin proprietas, from proprius ‘one's own, particular’ (see proper).

Pronunciation

property

/ˈprɒpəti/