Definition of propaganda in English:

propaganda

noun

  • 1[mass noun] Information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote a political cause or point of view:

    ‘he was charged with distributing enemy propaganda’
    • ‘One of the first aims of propaganda is to dehumanize the enemy in the public mind.’
    • ‘It makes me so mad that we often get propaganda and not news from the television and daily papers.’
    • ‘This propaganda was drilled into American soldiers for more than a year before the war.’
    • ‘He then went on to use this view as propaganda to control people and make them feel what he was doing was right.’
    • ‘You have to be a lot better at propaganda if you want to make people listen to your views.’
    • ‘They set up strike committees, produced propaganda and even put on shows and political theatre.’
    • ‘The internet became a powerful tool in countering the official propaganda.’
    • ‘Science is the search for fact, not the publication of spurious propaganda.’
    • ‘Of course, an evil regime will attempt to use our views for its propaganda.’
    • ‘The television screen greatly enhances the possibility of spreading the propaganda of the deed.’
    • ‘He is not misled by the xenophobic propaganda and can judge it on the merit of its source.’
    • ‘Newspaper proprietors accepted the new controls on the altar of total war and co-operated in disseminating government propaganda.’
    • ‘America's wartime radio propaganda emphasised an increasingly corporate vision of America's future.’
    • ‘Kingston residents are intelligent enough to recognise crude political propaganda when they see it.’
    • ‘They were intended to conduct psychological warfare and distribute anticommunist propaganda.’
    • ‘Despite an almost complete lack of alternative sources of information, we did not believe the official propaganda.’
    • ‘Most blogs are a form of personal propaganda, stating views in an authoritative tone.’
    • ‘The Prague story has now been publicly exposed as a fraudulent piece of war propaganda.’
    • ‘More serious, however, was the ineffectiveness of official propaganda in favour of the war.’
    • ‘The most popular arena for spreading false propaganda is the Internet.’
    information, promotion, advertising, advertisement, publicity, advocacy
    spin, newspeak, agitprop, disinformation, counter-information, brainwashing, indoctrination, the big lie
    info, hype, plugging
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 The dissemination of propaganda as a political strategy:
      ‘the party's leaders believed that a long period of education and propaganda would be necessary’
      • ‘To regard this as a propaganda coup is to misunderstand the sociopathic threat that confronts us.’
      • ‘The Cold War may be over, but the intelligence-gathering and propaganda machines grind on.’
      • ‘The miners were no angels but the media was blatantly and cynically used as a propaganda machine for the government.’
      • ‘The influence of advertisers is only one element of this propaganda system.’
      • ‘The media and the government started a fierce propaganda campaign to change this opinion.’
      • ‘The US media and politicians were quick to spot the propaganda potential of these victories.’
      • ‘The Independent's source then shed additional light on the tactics of the government propaganda machine.’
      • ‘It all looked terribly cool, the power of propaganda and marketing at work.’
      • ‘Perhaps only a long period of education or propaganda could remove our abhorrence.’
      • ‘Removal of context is one of most persistent propaganda tactics around.’
      • ‘One part of what we have to do is contest reformism's ideas and practices, in direct argument and propaganda.’
      • ‘The third method is to set up a system of accountability for propaganda work.’
      • ‘What should have been a propaganda coup for Germany turned out to be the opposite.’
      • ‘This stands, as we shall see, in a long tradition of propaganda by deed.’
      • ‘The role of the government propaganda camps known as public schools cannot be discounted in all this.’
      • ‘It is time our student funded newspaper practised true journalism and not propaganda.’
  • 2A committee of cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church responsible for foreign missions, founded in 1622 by Pope Gregory XV.

Origin

Italian, from modern Latin congregatio de propaganda fide congregation for propagation of the faith (see propaganda). propaganda dates from the early 20th century.

Pronunciation:

propaganda

/prɒpəˈɡandə/