Definition of proggy in English:

proggy

adjective

informal
  • 1(of rock music) likened to or resembling progressive rock.

    ‘they turned the proggy concept album into an art form’
    ‘if you prefer your rock to be very proggy, then this is for you’
    • ‘Personally, I found the disc pretty boring and bland, but I guess it's not really my style, being kind of proggy and sludgy.’
    • ‘Experimental and proggy, these modern death metal forward-thinkers call to mind bands like The Faceless and Rivers of Nihil.’
    • ‘There's a hint of math-rock in the song structures, but with less emphasis on proggy displays of skills.’
    • ‘They deal in a tidy but dark brand of fusion, characterised by restless drumming, proggy gothic keyboards and spiky but lyrical guitar heroics.’
    • ‘In addition to pop nuggets from the Zombies, he tosses in jazz, proggy instrumentals, 80s Euro-disco, rare groove funk, and some solo steel string guitar.’
    • ‘I listen to all this proggy metal that I'm sure he doesn't like.’
    • ‘Alex sings on a really weird piece called "Spellbound," where everything sounds all proggy and delicious.’
    • ‘Expect some seriously proggy jams on top of that, too!’
    • ‘Opener "Medication" is a rich sprawl of fluid guitar, rumbling low bass and vaguely proggy indie rock from outer space.’
    • ‘The band then attack the classic song with their own unique, proggy twist.’
  • 2US derogatory Politically progressive.

    ‘the proggie left’
    ‘proggie legislation’
    • ‘How's about you take a shot at proving just one of your proggie talking points?’
    • ‘It's no secret that he has proggy leanings, but this demonstrates a level of ignorance that is completely unexpected.’
    • ‘When he was on O'Dea's morning radio show, he was espousing all the Proggie talking points as fast as his lips could move.’
    • ‘This is all proggie posturing to their next big goal: Nationalize the Oil Industry.’
    • ‘That's so in the end the proggie government could evade responsibility for the inevitable crash, and blame it on the banks.’
    • ‘I always think it's funny to watch proggie leaders demonize companies until they start paying said proggie leaders hush money consulting fees.’
    • ‘"Corporate welfare" is a buzzword in the proggie community for any missed opportunity to tax private industry.’
    • ‘I had a faceoff with a local congressman who everyone loved because he was a reliable defender of proggie causes.’
    • ‘He's suckered the rest of proggy America into having the moronic belief he has something to do with the Texas economy.’
    • ‘I've seen NOTHING in the proggy blogosphere on social services/entitlement cuts for a long time.’

noun

US
derogatory, informal
  • An advocate of social reform; a progressive.

    ‘the proggies took over the party decades ago’
    • ‘Ask a proggie to explain to you how exactly 'diversity makes us stronger'.’
    • ‘Remember this article the next time some proggie is whimpering about 'the gap between the rich and the poor'.’
    • ‘Proggies only make up 20% of your party.’
    • ‘The proggies never hesitate to simply redefine the meaning of words whenever it benefits the cause.’
    • ‘It is something that even a Lefty/Proggie can understand.’
    • ‘He's not a liberal-loving proggy.’
    • ‘The proggies have come too close to their dream, after 100 years of hard work, to walk away from it now.’

Pronunciation

proggy

/ˈprɒɡi/