Definition of prodigality in English:

prodigality

noun

  • See prodigal

    • ‘Lucy Moore writes with a glad eye of the prodigality of unrestrained royalty, the full-blown excess that in the end wearied the more realistic Queen Victoria.’
    • ‘Gordon doesn't do short-term these days: he prefers to engage in long-term forecasts of future prosperity, to legitimise current prodigality.’
    • ‘There was an exuberance or prodigality of sweetness about the mere act of living which our race finds it difficult not to associate with forbidden and extravagant actions.’
    • ‘The Count liked to find his own prodigality in others.’
    • ‘The Venetian comedy also includes a pair of social parasites living off the prodigality of the extravagant young couple.’
    • ‘I chose the Four Seasons George V, off the Champs Elysées, recently refurbished in its original 1928 decorative prodigality.’

Pronunciation

prodigality

/prɒdɪˈɡalɪti/