Definition of private press in English:

private press

noun

  • A printing establishment operated on a small scale by a private person or group, in which the emphasis is on quality and individuality rather than profit.

    • ‘The private press is now getting under way here; we have The Kabul Weekly, which has just started, which is in four languages, and in UNESCO we helped to fund that to get that back on its feet; and newspapers are springing up all over the place.’
    • ‘This council, on which the private press is well represented, is responsible for dealing with complaints from the public.’
    • ‘Many of Hughes's books from both commercial and private presses contain pictures, mostly of animals and landscapes.’
    • ‘In 1900 Walker and a book designer set up the Doves Press, which helped to promote the revival of private press printing.’
    • ‘FGM is illegal under the Penal Code, and senior officials and both the official and private press have spoken against the practice; however, there have been no prosecutions for violations of the code.’
    • ‘Morris's influence was immediate, and private presses producing fine examples of craftsmanship, such as the Ashendene Press, Eragny Press, Essex House, and the Doves Press, all started less than a decade after Morris's first efforts.’
    • ‘This tiny Red Sea nation is now Africa's foremost jailer of journalists, with at least 13 reporters behind bars and the entire private press banned since September.’
    • ‘In 1919 he helped to found the Society of Wood Engravers, and from 1924 to 1933 he ran the Golden Cockerel Press, one of the most distinguished private presses of the day.’
    • ‘The ‘project’ began just after Thomas B. Lockwood donated his private library of rare books and private presses to the University, then the University of Buffalo.’
    • ‘Despite Bancroft's literary interests, neither Darbyshire nor Fairfax Murray could convince him of the artistic importance of the books produced by this early private press.’
    • ‘His Vale Press, founded in 1896, was one of the most important of the private presses.’
    • ‘It has been Africa's foremost jailer of journalists since September 2001, when the government banned the entire private press and detained independent reporters.’
    • ‘And then there were the complaints about vast conspiracies in the private press.’
    • ‘I noted recently from a memoir by Ian Fletcher that John published Lawrence Durrell's first collection of poems when he ran a small private press in the Thirties.’
    • ‘They were conditioned by the society and moral programme they railed against - through the medium of private presses.’