Definition of presale in English:

presale

adjective

  • 1Relating to the time before something is made available for purchase.

    ‘the picture had a presale estimate of £800,000 to £1.2 million’
    ‘presale orders have been strong’
    • ‘The sixth installment, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince," already has presale orders of more than 10 million copies.’
    • ‘The top price was $20.9 million for Monet's Waterlilies, slightly above the $20-million presale estimate.’
    • ‘The 22 precious pieces will be sold at Bonhams' Edinburgh auction room on Wednesday, when experts say they could far exceed their £55,000 presale estimate.’
    • ‘The collection, which had a presale estimate of more than $140 million, netted $190 million.’
    • ‘The presale buzz was intense for the following evening's single-owner auction at Sotheby's.’
    • ‘Mercedes will take the presale hype to new levels as it develops a program to sell the ultra-luxury SLR sports car and Maybach sedan years before they are built.’
    • ‘Presale estimates are proposed by the auction houses for the hammer prices, exclusive of commissions.’
    • ‘Tickets go on general sale on June 19, with members of Beyonce's fan club having access to pre-sale tickets on June 17 at 8:00am CET.’
    • ‘On Wednesday the singer increased her initial 15 performances to 22, due to pre-sale ticket demand from fans.’
    • ‘The Christie's auction of the 14.82-carat rare gem fetched almost twice the pre-sale price of $20 million.’
  • 2Relating to the time before a period when goods are sold at reduced prices.

    ‘the presale price’
    • ‘Put an item down in price for a while then instead of removing the special offer and showing the old presale price, simply put a new, higher price on the item.’
    • ‘Take a healthy degree of scepticism with you if you're shopping this weekend, ignore the pre-sale price on 'was £xx, now £xx' discounts and make your decision to buy based solely on what you'll pay now.’
    • ‘Under Trading Standards rules, pre-sale prices should be the last price at which goods were offered - and the goods should have been at that price for 28 consecutive days in the previous six months.’
    • ‘According to the OFT, these chains have been inflating pre-sale pricing far beyond what products were ever sold for.’

noun

  • A sale held or made before an item is made generally available for purchase.

    ‘we bought our tickets through a presale six months prior to the concert’
    mass noun ‘the product is available now for presale’
    • ‘The product is available now for presale on Amazon.com and will ship when it is widely released.’
    • ‘From Thursday 3rd there will be a presale of tickets to registered fans at the website.’
    • ‘There's an internet presale on Nov. 1 and the general onsale date is Nov. 5.’
    • ‘There is a current presale if you are on the getlive mailout.’
    • ‘I'm not eligible for the presale.’
    • ‘"The fact that we got so many pre-sales for Saturday is an indication about how much the region has embraced the event."’
    • ‘My friend (an even bigger fanatic than myself) bought our tickets through a presale six months prior to the concert.’
    • ‘The Sidekick LX 2009 is available for presale now, and will be available on May 13 for $200 in a dark gray or maroon color.’
    • ‘Tickets officialy go on sale at 7 am on Friday but hundreds of thousands were sold during an 18-hour presale earlier in the week.’
    • ‘Tickets will be available to the public on Saturday, but will also be up in a presale beginning Wednesday for all shows with the exception of gigs in Toronto and Ottawa.’

Pronunciation

presale

/ˈpriːseɪl/