Definition of preoccupation in English:

preoccupation

noun

mass noun
  • 1The state or condition of being preoccupied or engrossed with something.

    ‘his preoccupation with politics’
    • ‘The renewed preoccupation with design is understandable, given a little history.’
    • ‘It seems likely that the writer's preoccupation with chances missed and stories lost has this absence at its heart.’
    • ‘There is both an institutional and individual preoccupation with measurement of performance.’
    • ‘The writer himself was well aware of the divided critical opinion about his work and his endless preoccupation with the darker side of life.’
    • ‘Moreover, Lyly's preoccupation with mistaken identity may have influenced Shakespeare.’
    • ‘What Chaterji found disconcerting was the time consuming preoccupation with technology.’
    • ‘The state's increasing preoccupation with how we raise our children risks penalising the poorest parents’
    • ‘Despite this preoccupation with finding evil, they are able to recognize the good in anyone or anything.’
    • ‘The saving grace of the past few days has been my preoccupation with a new geeky toy, a DVD recorder.’
    • ‘Sometimes I find this preoccupation with what's happening now really frustrating.’
    • ‘Even so, he is surprised to have survived so long in such a demanding position, given the modern preoccupation with hiring and firing.’
    • ‘I'm quite conscious that preoccupation with the past can also be a way of absolving oneself of present obligations.’
    • ‘The real escalation is in our narcissistic preoccupation with ourselves.’
    • ‘I asked some moments ago what connection you see between the conciseness of your poems and their preoccupation with pain.’
    • ‘Given the current preoccupation with the risks associated with driving, these proposals come as little surprise.’
    • ‘The contemporary preoccupation with self is not so much a reflection of the moral decadence of our age as a pitiful search for identity.’
    pensiveness, concentration, engrossment, absorption, self-absorption, musing, thinking, thinking of other things, deep thought, brown study, brooding
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1count noun A subject or matter that engrosses someone.
      ‘their main preoccupation was how to feed their families’
      • ‘It is, in other words, a text that reflects the preoccupations and worldview of its subject.’
      • ‘This time, his stated preoccupations are impossible to ignore.’
      • ‘Creative people need to be encouraged to think far more about their audience's needs, and far less about their own preoccupations.’
      • ‘I talked to a group of lads involved with the project, who in exchange for anonymity talked frankly about their preoccupations.’
      • ‘In conversation, Miller seems fully attentive to the present and its preoccupations.’
      • ‘Melburnians tend to have two main preoccupations, the two S's: sport and Sydney.’
      • ‘Not the least of the nation's preoccupations in the present situation concerns the demonisation of the particular communities.’
      • ‘The same range of topics and preoccupations fueled discussion on the other side of the Atlantic.’
      • ‘These themes show the preoccupations of both virus writers and those they are targeting with their malicious code, Cluley reckons.’
      • ‘Man Listening To Disc and Marginalia are creepily accurate portrayals of aspects of my two main preoccupations.’
      • ‘As public life is emptied out and loses direction, private and personal preoccupations are projected into the public sphere.’
      • ‘Such preoccupations are bound to be bad for you, aren't they?’
      • ‘Paolozzi shares many of the Surrealists' preoccupations, in particular an interest in the power of dolls and mannequins.’
      • ‘Much more interesting is the fact that Larkin waited so confidently for his methods and preoccupations to come into focus.’
      • ‘The main issues discussed in the volume reflect the preoccupations of the fields of business and economic history.’
      obsession, concern, fixation
      View synonyms

Origin

Late 16th century (first used in rhetoric in the sense ‘anticipating and meeting objections beforehand’): from Latin praeoccupatio(n-), from praeoccupare ‘seize beforehand’ (see preoccupy).

Pronunciation

preoccupation

/prɪˌɒkjʊˈpeɪʃ(ə)n/