Definition of premonition in English:

premonition

noun

  • A strong feeling that something is about to happen, especially something unpleasant.

    ‘he had a premonition of imminent disaster’
    • ‘It can indicate premonitions or other intuitions about what is to come.’
    • ‘Perhaps my visions are premonitions… though I doubt it greatly.’
    • ‘There is a mystery lurking in Julie's past, a dead body in the pool house, a wizened dwarf all dressed in black: omens, premonitions, suspicions that things are not what they seem.’
    • ‘The prince searches for her through the white night of St. Petersburg, his mind full of confusion, premonitions and anxiety, as on the eve of an attack.’
    • ‘She glanced at Bev and realized her friend was worried about the premonition.’
    • ‘I had strong premonitions of doom, the unmistakable feeling I was walking into a trap.’
    • ‘My cousin's wife spent last night talking about horrible premonitions and it didn't take much to convince my cousin that they would be better off at home.’
    • ‘A chill, in accordance with all the cliches about premonitions and fears, went up my spine. I got up on the counter.’
    • ‘Marriage is a very real commitment and is devoid of the romantic notions and premonitions we have about it, and that we carry before engagement.’
    • ‘I am quite sure that you should not worry too much about your premonitions.’
    apprehension, apprehensiveness, anxiety, perturbation, trepidation, disquiet, disquietude, unease, uneasiness, misgiving, suspicion, worry, fear, fearfulness, dread, alarm
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘advance warning’): from French prémonition, from late Latin praemonitio(n-), from Latin praemonere, from prae ‘before’ + monere ‘warn’.

Pronunciation

premonition

/ˌpriːməˈnɪʃ(ə)n//ˌprɛməˈnɪʃ(ə)n/