Main definitions of predate in English

: predate1predate2

predate1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Exist or occur at a date earlier than (something)

    ‘here parish boundaries seem clearly to predate Roman roads’
    • ‘The show had well passed its sell by date (it pre-dated Showboat on Broadway, where it opened the Ziegfeld Theatre).’
    • ‘They thought its unusual burial scene - pre-dating the Egyptian practice of mummification - was a fake because it was ‘too good to be true’.’
    • ‘It is one of the oldest ball games, pre-dating soccer and rugby, and is played with 15 players per side.’
    • ‘Zhang claims to have harvested more than 20 stone patterns appearing to match crop circle formations from other countries, but pre-dating them by up to 3,000 years.’
    • ‘With just his guitar and a four-track tape machine, he conceived the stark sounding, tormented soul of Nebraska, pre-dating the alt-country movement by a good 10 years.’
    • ‘Founded in 1608, it is the oldest on the continent, and has many of the touches that Europe takes for granted - city walls, cobbled streets, and a history that pre-dates your grandfather.’
    • ‘The finding of a common set of genetic markers in both Ashkenazi and Sephardi Cohanim worldwide clearly indicates an origin pre-dating the separate development of the two communities around 1000 CE.’
    • ‘The language of their movement clearly pre-dated this century.’
    • ‘This particular patch of green is the oldest jungle on the planet, pre-dating the extinction of the dinosaurs by 35 million years.’
    • ‘More surprisingly, much of the modern church and adjacent holy well sit on underground cisterns that clearly pre-date them, and appear to be of Byzantine date.’
    • ‘What that shows is that there is a natural global low frequency electromagnetic signal pre-dating life on earth, so we have evolved in the presence of this signal.’
    • ‘This nomadic lifestyle long pre-dates the famine and in pre-conquest Gaelic Ireland, society was largely a mobile one as people moved cattle about and serviced those who moved cattle.’
    • ‘It dates back for thirty or forty thousand years pre-dating all world religions.’
    • ‘The demolition would clear the site despite the fact that the cottage, which pre-dates the viaduct and is typical of traditional development at Waterside, appeared to be in sound condition and capable of redevelopment.’
    • ‘Prosecutors said the committee had approved applicants who presented forged honours that carried dates pre-dating the actual creation of the vaunted title.’

Pronunciation:

predate

/priːˈdeɪt/

Main definitions of predate in English

: predate1predate2

predate2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • (of an animal) act as a predator of; catch and eat (prey).

    • ‘A further 13 % were predated or scavenged during the shooting season (some of which may have been shot but not picked up).’

Origin

1940s: back-formation from predation.

Pronunciation:

predate

/priːˈdeɪt/