Definition of precession in English:

precession

noun

mass nounPhysics
  • The slow movement of the axis of a spinning body around another axis due to a torque (such as gravitational influence) acting to change the direction of the first axis. It is seen in the circle slowly traced out by the pole of a spinning gyroscope.

    • ‘Of course, the anomalous precession of Mercury was already known, and general relativity could explain it.’
    • ‘As the tailwheel lifts during the takeoff run, gyroscopic precession tries to turn the plane left of centerline.’
    • ‘Einstein's theory predicts that such gyroscopes will undergo geodetic precession merely because space-time is curved in the planet's vicinity.’
    • ‘The binary's orbital precession, for example, is quite vigorous.’
    • ‘Even Newtonian physics was unable to give a complete explanation of its orbit: the direction of the axis was found to move by rather more than could be explained by precession and the gravitational attraction of the other planets.’

Origin

Late 16th century (as a term in astronomy, referring to the precession of the equinoxes): from late Latin praecessio(n-), from praecedere ‘go before’ (see precede).

Pronunciation

precession

/prɪˈsɛʃ(ə)n/