Definition of preceptor in English:

preceptor

noun

  • A teacher or instructor.

    • ‘After the classroom component of the program was completed, the educators and manager placed the students with preceptors in the clinical areas.’
    • ‘Using this instrument, preceptees' attitudes toward their preceptors may be identified and professionally inviting practices determined.’
    • ‘For Tagore, the teacher is a preceptor whose living example is more important and influential than his learning or scholarship.’
    • ‘It is important to remember these two types of personalities when educators and preceptors plan lessons, classes, or demonstrations.’
    • ‘When educators, preceptors, and managers relive situations, it is a form of storytelling.’
    • ‘At four schools, preceptors were available for counseling and to act as resource people.’
    • ‘It is a must for educators, preceptors, and managers of perioperative services.’
    • ‘The course also includes an education module for preceptors.’
    • ‘All details of his upbringing, training and education are to be guided by the preceptor.’
    • ‘The challenge for nurse preceptors is that perioperative education takes place in a complex environment.’
    • ‘A faculty preceptor from each school assumed the responsibility for selecting students and the on-site supervision of the student research assistants.’
    • ‘Invitational education assumes that preceptors will display trust, respect, intentionality, and optimism toward preceptees.’
    • ‘Seasoned preceptors can teach, express their feelings about a given situation, and satisfy their need to demonstrate their knowledge by telling stories.’
    • ‘Committed, competent nurses need support from educators, preceptors, supervisors, peers, and mentors.’
    • ‘Ideally, the preceptor fosters an open learning environment.’
    • ‘Minority pharmacy graduates may be willing to serve as mentors or preceptors for minority students and participate in student recruitment activities in their local area.’
    • ‘Other documented ratios were three to four students per preceptor, and four students per three preceptors.’
    • ‘Weekly inservice programs can help educate potential preceptors about precepting students.’
    • ‘The educator then placed the student with a preceptor for that day.’
    • ‘Her peers compliment her on being an excellent teacher, preceptor and team member.’
    educator, tutor, instructor, pedagogue, schoolteacher, schoolmaster, schoolmistress, master, mistress, governess, educationalist, educationist
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Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin praeceptor, from praecept- ‘warned, instructed’, from the verb praecipere (see precept).

Pronunciation

preceptor

/prɪˈsɛptə/