Definition of poverty trap in English:

poverty trap

noun

British
  • A situation in which an increase in someone's income is offset by a consequent loss of state benefits, leaving them no better off.

    • ‘That is a serious poverty trap, because there is a low-skilled family on a benefit, trying to get off the benefit - trapped!’
    • ‘As we argued earlier, reducing the risk of production shortfalls helps avoid the poverty trap that induces people to degrade the land.’
    • ‘Introduce a citizen's income allowance for all and end the poverty trap.’
    • ‘It warned yesterday that even more people were in danger of falling into the poverty trap because of the economic downturn.’
    • ‘This could have been one of those years that can throw a person into a poverty trap.’
    • ‘A lot of people fall into the poverty trap but are not eligible for benefits such as school meals.’
    • ‘‘The report,’ she said, ‘presents a sobering list of barriers to low income lone parents getting out of the poverty trap.’’
    • ‘Make no mistake: they are all for reducing the poverty trap so that beneficiaries do not face a drop in income when they enter or return to the workforce, but there are real problems with the targeted system currently in place.’
    • ‘But the poverty trap still traps because of the loss of housing benefits and the regressive nature of national insurance and tax policies, which hit low earners hard.’
    • ‘When my husband died I fell for the benefits line, not realising it would put me in the poverty trap for the rest of my life because I can't work and be better off.’
    • ‘The account, designed to lift the poorest customers out of the poverty trap, will also provide a free benefit check for those in greatest need.’
    • ‘At the same time, however, the city has a solid, and seemingly intractable core of families caught in the poverty trap, living on benefits, untrained and unequipped for the job market.’
    • ‘The threshold includes families on income support or job seekers allowance but excludes those whose income is only fractionally higher, perpetrating the classic poverty trap.’
    • ‘Moreover, the signs are that after all the initial optimism, these two upwardly mobile sides are starting to feel increasingly ensnared in the poverty trap that continues to devastate teams in the division.’
    • ‘It would also help families to keep out of the poverty trap, which can often mean that benefits are better than pay.’
    • ‘Many are in a poverty trap, and they fill an increasing number of minimum-wage positions.’
    • ‘It also isn't clear how parents who are trying to get out of the poverty trap will be able to afford these places.’
    • ‘A recent article, however, points to a medical poverty trap, created by the introduction of user fees for public services and the growth of out of pocket expenses for private services.’
    • ‘They are locked in a poverty trap because of the strain on their health and their time.’
    • ‘Stuck in a poverty trap, these families live simple and basic lives, ‘in the middle of nowhere, behind the sun’.’

Pronunciation

poverty trap