Main definitions of pound in English

: pound1pound2pound3

pound1

noun

  • 1A unit of weight equal to 16 oz. avoirdupois (0.4536 kg), or 12 oz. troy (0.3732 kg).

    • ‘A short ton is the standard U.S. ton of 2,000 pounds and measures weight.’
    • ‘Medication errors in children can occur when a decimal point is misplaced in a dose, or an incorrect weight conversion from pounds to kilograms is made.’
    • ‘Each reel of film weighs about 350 pounds and is moved around with a special forklift.’
    • ‘The airplane was covered with a thick layer of ice that had deformed the normally efficient airfoil and added several hundred pounds of extra weight.’
    • ‘Subject height was 5 feet and 3 inches and subject weight was 47 pounds and 4 ounces.’
    • ‘The squid weighs about 550 pounds and was found in two pieces on Seven Mile Beach.’
    • ‘It is approved for rates of 1-3 ounces per hundred pounds of seed.’
    • ‘It could be anything, from tiny fractions of a gram to hundreds of pounds of high explosives.’
    • ‘Thus, using this value is a bit like rounding off your own weight to the nearest hundred pounds.’
    • ‘Also, please keep in mind that no matter where you are, a kilogram equals 2.2 pounds.’
    • ‘More than 200 pounds of chilled, wet bamboo were in supply to cater to any hunger pangs.’
    • ‘Distances still refer to yards or miles, weights are in pounds and ounces, and temperature readings are in Fahrenheit.’
    • ‘The average weight of workers when they left the factory was 76 pounds.’
    • ‘Also, no single piece of luggage should exceed 70 pounds or 32 kilos in weight.’
    • ‘Birth weight was recorded in pounds and ounces and converted into kilograms.’
    • ‘A Gecko can support the equivalent of 90 pounds while hanging upside down.’
    • ‘At a weight of two hundred pounds, he is still nowhere near his goal, but he has already made a vast improvement.’
    • ‘Through weight training and cardio, I lost another 19 pounds and gained a ton of muscle.’
    • ‘Most cohort members reported their offspring's birth weights in pounds and ounces.’
    • ‘In cooking, ingredients are expressed in teaspoons, tablespoons, ounces, pounds, and cups.’
  • 2"( plural pounds sterling ) "The basic monetary unit of the UK, equal to 100 pence.

    • ‘Missed holidays mean that nearly four billion pounds worth of work goes unpaid across the country each year.’
    • ‘For instance, a major reason for the damaging appreciations of the dollar and the pound sterling in the 1980s was tight monetary policy in the United States and United Kingdom respectively.’
    • ‘The dollar will continue to slide against the Euro and the Pound, reaching a low of $2 to the pound before the middle of the year (and possibly sinking further).’
    • ‘It's a curious truth that, in the middle of a multi-million pound anti-truancy drive, most of the people this campaign is aimed at simply don't know what those in authority are talking about.’
    • ‘The data will be required to be submitted on a quarterly basis and will be in the five major currencies of the world, viz., the US dollar, the yen, the Deutsche mark, the pound sterling, and the euro.’
    • ‘According to analysts, sale of the company could raise several hundred million pounds.’
    • ‘The owner said that it had cost 85,000 British pounds which was 20,000 over his budget.’
    • ‘A popular village event which raises thousands of pounds for charity is under threat.’
    • ‘I want to take advantage of the relative values of the pound sterling and the Australian dollar.’
    • ‘Changes in exchange rates between the UK pounds sterling and the US dollar will affect the translation of the UK subsidiaries' financial results into US dollars for the purposes of reporting the consolidated financial results.’
    • ‘As things stand we are looking at the euro going to $1.40 and the pound sterling being worth two dollars in the New Year.’
    • ‘The cedi dropped 12 cents against the U.S. dollar and 83 cents against the pound at the end of April.’
    • ‘The only exceptions to this convention are quotes in relation to the euro, the pound sterling and the Australian dollar - these three are quoted as dollars per foreign currency.’
    • ‘Vandals have trashed 52 shopping trolleys, causing thousands of pounds worth of damage.’
    • ‘A post office worker has admitted stealing thousands of pounds worth of benefit payments.’
    pound sterling, £
    quid, smacker, smackeroo, nicker, oner, oncer
    sovereign
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1
      another term for punt
    2. 2.2 The basic monetary unit of several Middle Eastern countries, equal to 100 piastres.
      • ‘More than seven million Egyptian pounds have been spent on updating it to prepare for privatisation.’
      • ‘He said coalition forces on the ground recovered numerous weapons, 2m Iraqi dinars and Syrian pounds, foreign passports and a satcom radio.’
    3. 2.3 The former basic monetary unit of Cyprus, equal to 100 cents.
    4. 2.4 The basic monetary unit of Sudan.
      • ‘The north, he said, would continue with the dinar and south Sudan would adopt the new Sudan pound.’

Phrases

  • a pound to a penny

    • informal Used to emphasize one's certainty about something:

      ‘simply think of your budget and a pound to a penny we'll have the car to suit it’
      • ‘I will lay a pound to a penny that if he does reintroduce fees the money will be used not to beat educational disadvantage, but either to pay public service wages or to reduce total state spending.’
      • ‘But a pound to a penny in old money, Fermanagh will come out on Saturday confident of polishing off Mayo and moving on to the All-Ireland final for the first time in their history.’
      • ‘I'd lay a pound to a penny that the first time Woking council invoke their new powers it will not be to defeat a cunning plot by international terrorists...but in a dispute over hedges or car parking.’
  • one's pound of flesh

    • Something one is strictly or legally entitled to, but which it is ruthless or inhuman to demand.

      • ‘Clubs are demanding their pound of flesh and, bit by bit, are seeking to subvert the supremacy of nationalist interests.’
      • ‘If the city councillors decide to go ahead with demanding their pound of flesh, perhaps the central government could compensate by offering to honour its moral obligation by paying the rent on behalf of the embassies.’
      • ‘And they let me do this three-CD spoken-word box set without really demanding a pound of flesh in return.’
      • ‘A thought for the New Year might be that they are after all money lenders and like the most famous of them, Shylock, there comes a time when they will demand their pound of flesh.’
      • ‘Despite the sport demanding its pound of flesh, financially and physically, he managed to pull his weight for four full years.’
      • ‘I sense they feel their power and, at the worst possible moment, double the price, or demand a pound of flesh.’
      • ‘‘The coalition partners will demand their pound of flesh when it comes to getting the best portfolios,’ said one observer.’
      • ‘And while the jury is aghast at some of the recent evidence, and will rightly demand its pound of flesh, it is also capable of taking a longer-term view.’
      • ‘Now that these men demand their pound of flesh in increasingly raucous voices, the government at the Centre has no resort left but to acquiesce.’
      • ‘But he will still demand his monthly pound of flesh.’

Origin

Old English pund, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch pond and German Pfund, from Latin ( libra) pondo, denoting a Roman ‘pound weight’ of 12 ounces.

Pronunciation:

pound

/paʊnd/

Main definitions of pound in English

: pound1pound2pound3

pound2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Strike or hit heavily and repeatedly:

    ‘Patrick pounded the couch with his fists’
    [no object] ‘pounding on the door, she shouted at the top of her voice’
    • ‘She narrowed her eyes and turned to the door, wanting to pound whoever was out there.’
    • ‘Chassepot armed infantry easily checked their opponents, but were pounded by artillery and forced to retreat as the Germans found their flanks.’
    • ‘Some of the vehicles look as though they have been pounded with a hammer.’
    • ‘I frantically pounded on the door, screaming to be let out.’
    • ‘It felt as if a million nails were being pounded by a hammer.’
    • ‘She could still hear the rain pounding away on the roof.’
    • ‘She woke up at noon the next day feeling as if a hammer had pounded each one of her muscles.’
    • ‘The rain was pounding heavily against the windows of the apartment.’
    • ‘The village was being pounded by volcano ejecta that have already flattened a house.’
    • ‘The spectacular shorelines were pounded by huge waves, hammering away at the enormous rock faces.’
    • ‘That was a mistake and that gave his opponent the chance to pound at his back.’
    • ‘I struck him, pounding on his chest with all my might as I continued my theatrics.’
    • ‘The rain was still pounding relentlessly against the glass, tapping and slapping.’
    • ‘This city has been pounded by artillery, by air strikes, by bombardment.’
    • ‘There was a resounding thud as the golem pounded one of the steel poles into the ground less than half a foot from Tim.’
    • ‘They awoke to find the rain pounding down on the sole window of their room.’
    • ‘She was standing right in front of the door with a giant umbrella in her hand and started pounding me with it and stabbing me with the point.’
    • ‘However, you will be able to dispatch most of these opponents by pounding on the primary attack button whenever an enemy nears you.’
    • ‘It goes with the territory when you weigh 255 pounds and lack elusiveness and opponents have been pounding on you for three months.’
    • ‘A boat from the killer fleet had struck the reef out past the skerries and was being pounded to pieces by the pelting waves.’
    beat against, crash against, batter, dash against, crack against, crack into, lash, strike, hit, buffet
    bombard, bomb, shell, blitz, strafe, torpedo, pepper, fire on, attack
    beat, strike, hit, batter, thump, pummel, punch, rain blows on, belabour, hammer, thrash, set on, tear into, weigh into, bang, crack, drub, welt, thwack
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1[no object] Beat or throb with a strong regular rhythm:
      ‘her heart was pounding’
      • ‘She waited a beat, her heart pounding in her ears, then laughed again.’
      • ‘There are countless others including some recently written that would take very little to get the blood pounding and the heart throbbing.’
      • ‘Blood pounded in her temples, her cheeks burnt with the shock of impact.’
      • ‘My heart pounded furiously in my chest, and dizziness washed over me in waves.’
      • ‘His heart began to pound loudly in his ears as the woman perused his features blankly.’
      • ‘His throat was dry, and his head was pounding like a bass drum, but otherwise he felt ok.’
      • ‘Her heart began to race inside of her chest, pounding against her ribcage.’
      • ‘His feet were still pounding a maniacal staccato beat.’
      • ‘I suddenly realized that my heart was pounding and beating so fast it hurt.’
      • ‘The voices still pounded away in his ears even though they had gone long ago.’
      • ‘I could feel his pulse pounding in his throat.’
      • ‘His heart pounded quickly, beating out a fierce tattoo in his strong chest as he walked down the paths which wound and turned into dead ends.’
      • ‘She was weak, now, even with the vampiric blood pounding through her veins.’
      • ‘He could feel the sweats in his hands, and the heartbeat pounding against his rib cage.’
      • ‘Rachel could feel her heart start pounding faster at the sight of his smile.’
      • ‘Still moving, we drew nearer to the location and our hearts began to pound faster.’
      • ‘He kicked it with his toe, his pulse pounding with excitement.’
      • ‘As I moved cautiously back to my room, my heart never stopped pounding loudly in my ears.’
      • ‘The man's eyes darted open as he glanced around the room for a moment, heart pounding and hand throbbing in sympathy with the memory.’
      • ‘He could feel the anger swelling up and beginning to pound through his veins.’
      throb, thump, thud, hammer, pulsate, pulse, pump, palpitate, race, beat heavily, go pit-a-pat, pitter-patter, vibrate, drum
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2[no object, with adverbial of direction] Walk or run with heavy steps:
      ‘I heard him pounding along the gangway’
      • ‘Leanne's outrage returned and she flung her mother aside, her feet pounding up the front steps.’
      • ‘Finally, he vanished from sight and she heard the sound of horses hooves rapidly pounding away.’
      • ‘Her feet pounded down the steps, echoing through the hollow grayness of the castle.’
      • ‘It is all too easy to sneak out of the apartment now, and within the space of five minutes, my footsteps are pounding along the pavement.’
      • ‘She heard steps pounded down the hallway, they were only slightly muffled by the carpet.’
      • ‘Before he had time to respond the blonde was already pounding down the steps and on her way into the kitchen.’
      • ‘Heavy footsteps pounding down the thickly carpeted steps as Ethan entered the room, one of his endless flings hanging onto his arms.’
      • ‘Feet could be heard pounding down the steps to his quarters and a voice cried out, ‘Maurice!’’
      • ‘They heard heavy footsteps pounding on the stone steps and they saw Matilda standing in front of them with her smile at its most evil.’
      • ‘The soldier had regained his feet and pounded up the steps after her.’
      • ‘Footsteps pounded the pavement behind them, and Devon gripped her hand tightly.’
      • ‘A few steps into the house, loud steps pounded down the stairs.’
      • ‘I could hear ten pairs of heavy feet pound past me as Julius yanked me up.’
      • ‘They could hear him running down the corridor, feet pounding along the steps.’
      • ‘He footsteps pounded down the stairs and rang in my ears.’
      • ‘The ability to think rationally flooded out of her as she heard his heavy footsteps pounding louder.’
      • ‘But running, especially pounding along on a hard surface like a road or path, can put a lot of strain on joints.’
      • ‘Heavy feet pounded on the packed dirt and a moment later Michael was wading into the fray.’
      • ‘His sneakers pounded the black pavement as he bolted to the sliding glass doors.’
      • ‘The sound of steps pounding on linoleum rang out, so close, so close, coming from just beyond the door, and yet she couldn't move.’
      run heavily, walk heavily, stomp, lumber, clomp, clump, tramp, trudge
      View synonyms
  • 2Crush or grind (something) into a powder or paste:

    ‘pound the cloves with salt and pepper until smooth’
    • ‘Traditionally, a mortar pestle is used to pound the coffee, but he tells me that with the passage of time, quite a few things have changed.’
    • ‘Using a mortar and pestle, pound the white peppercorns, cilantro roots and garlic cloves into a thick paste, adding each ingredient one at a time.’
    • ‘Currently at the moment they're making cardamom, and you can hear they're pounding, so they clean it and then they pound it and then they grind it on stone, and we sell the spices with our logo on it.’
    • ‘Whiz them to a powder using a spice or coffee grinder, or pound them in a pestle and mortar.’
    • ‘As the ingredients are pounded they release their fragrance; the balance of the paste can be perceived in this aroma, and is adjusted while being made.’
    • ‘For example, I was trying to mash up some potatoes, and I guess I was pounding the potatoes too hard.’
    • ‘Slowly add olive oil to loosen the paste as you pound it then add the rest of the cheese.’
    • ‘In a mortar, pound the salt, garlic and anchovies to a paste.’
    • ‘In Africa, fufu is made by boiling plantain, cassava, or rice, and then pounding it with a large wooden mortar and pestle.’
    • ‘She pounded the roots feverishly with mortar and pestle, mixing in a little water, and a little lamb's blood one of the women had brought to her from the courtyard.’
    • ‘Using a mortar and pestle, pound the garlic and chili pepper with olive oil to form a rough paste.’
    • ‘After pounding them in a mortar, one obtains a red powder, ndimba.’
    • ‘They may have been part of a pre-Christian religious ritual or they may have been communal property in which corn or oats was pounded or ground.’
    • ‘Using your pestle and mortar, you want to pound the garlic with a little pinch of salt along with the basil leaves.’
    • ‘These vegetables are often pounded into a thick, sticky dough or paste.’
    • ‘Writing, which ought to nurture and give shape to thought, is instead being used to pound it into a powder and then reconstitute it into gruel.’
    crush, grind, pulverize, beat, mill, pestle, mash, pulp, bruise, powder, granulate
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1informal Defeat (an opponent) in a resounding way:
      [with object and complement] ‘he pounded the unseeded American 6–2 7–5 7–5’
      • ‘After 40 pitches he tires, or opponents adjust and pound him.’
      • ‘Few teams have the personnel to slow down an opponent that can effectively run the break and also pound you inside.’
      • ‘But in April last year, he pounded him to defeat, knocking him out in the seventh round of a one-sided contest.’
      • ‘The All Whites shouldn't be constantly praised for ‘brave defeats’ when they've clearly been pounded.’
      • ‘The Drogheda man could not put two punches together as his eager opponent came forward, crowded him and pounded him with two fisted combinations.’
      • ‘He pounded him to defeat inside three rounds.’
      • ‘At least it lessened the surprise of his being pounded for eight runs in 4 innings, the worst start of his big-league career.’
      • ‘It was something of a massacre - Hawthorn pounded St Kilda into the ground in a major way, and I was glad to be only supporting them for today!’
      • ‘In a server market with millions of units shipped overall per quarter, it is pounding rivals into the ground with 3,178 sales.’
      beat, conquer, win against, win a victory over, triumph over, prevail over, get the better of, best, worst, vanquish
      View synonyms

Phrases

  • pound the beat

    • (of a police officer) patrol an allocated route or area.

      • ‘Employees pounded the beat with police officers as they blitzed householders with crime prevention advice.’
      • ‘He also called for an increase in police pounding the beat in the area, saying: ‘I think that local people want to see visible policing, with a higher profile.’’
      • ‘All council tax increases were pushed up by two percentage points to pay for a £43 million plan to get 567 extra police officers pounding the beat this year.’
      • ‘It is a matter of record that he, despite his seniority in the Metropolitan Police, has recently pounded the beat and personally made arrests.’
      • ‘I want to see bobbies pounding the beat around here on foot rather than driving around once or twice a night in a van.’
      • ‘That means the centre evaluating a whole raft of community safety measures, such as CCTV cameras, better street lighting - and the numbers of policemen pounding the beat.’
      • ‘He was involved in an initiative calling for senior Scotland Yard officers to pound the beat for at least four hours each month.’
      • ‘Paramedics are on call and police officers are pounding the beat.’
      • ‘In any case, the law has returned in the form of a local policeman pounding the beat (only daytime, but welcome all the same) and a traffic warden (unwelcome by one and all it would seem).’
      • ‘Four police officers were pounding the beat in a different part of London on Saturday as they zipped round the marathon course to raise over £3,000 for charity.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • pound something out

    • Produce a text or piece of music with heavy strokes on a keyboard or instrument:

      ‘an old typewriter on which she pounded out her poems’
      • ‘Written by a former Marine Corporal in 1987 when stationed in Washington D.C., it was pounded out on a typewriter while awaiting the commanding officer's Christmas holiday decoration inspection.’
      • ‘They are standing by the story, saying it's possible the documents were pounded out on a typewriter.’

Origin

Old English pūnian; related to Dutch puin, Low German pün (building) rubbish.

Pronunciation:

pound

/paʊnd/

Main definitions of pound in English

: pound1pound2pound3

pound3

noun

  • 1A place where stray animals, especially dogs, may be officially taken and kept until claimed by their owners.

    • ‘Like most pounds and animal welfare groups their policy is not to re-home puppies two weeks before Christmas.’
    • ‘He appealed to owners to take responsibility for their unwanted pets by phoning the dog warden or by dropping the animal to their local pound or animal sanctuary.’
    • ‘It is the animal pound's word against the neighbor's, and although I am guilty of not following the by-law, I hardly think that I deserve the heartache this has caused me.’
    • ‘They were dogs that had not the karma of household pets, or strays at the pound, but that of the seekers of ecumenical truth.’
    • ‘Anyone who has a problem with stray dogs can contact the County Dog Warden who will arrange to have the dog brought to an animal pound.’
    • ‘Aided by a donkey sanctuary welfare officer, he followed a trail that led him to animal pounds and fields in remote areas in the black of night.’
    • ‘The municipality will take steps to stop people adopting animals from the pound and then releasing them back on the streets.’
    • ‘I couldn't put other people's animals in the pound.’
    enclosure, compound, pen, yard
    greenyard
    pinfold
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A place where illegally parked motor vehicles removed by the police are kept until their owners pay a fine in order to reclaim them.
      • ‘At 1930 he and many other vehicles that had been stopped were escorted by police to the pound in East London, where our bakkie was impounded.’
    2. 1.2archaic A place of confinement; a trap or prison.

verb

[WITH OBJECT]archaic
  • Shut (an animal) in a pound.

Origin

Late Middle English (earlier in compounds): of uncertain origin. Early use referred to an enclosure for the detention of stray or trespassing cattle.

Pronunciation:

pound

/paʊnd/