Main definitions of potent in English

: potent1potent2

potent1

adjective

  • 1Having great power, influence, or effect.

    ‘thrones were potent symbols of authority’
    ‘a potent drug’
    • ‘The curse remains such a potent influence on the lives of New Englanders that they will go to extraordinary lengths to try to lift it.’
    • ‘Recognizing that, there is certainly sympathy to be had for those who have fallen prey to the drug's potent effects.’
    • ‘There is no more potent symbol of state power than the death penalty.’
    • ‘Moreover, although the unions are unhappy and still potent, their power is less than his Labour predecessors endured 20 and 30 years ago.’
    • ‘President Theodore Roosevelt, who in a fit of pique coined the term ‘muckraking’, called him a potent influence for evil.’
    • ‘The fashion business has also recaptured the potent power of the cigarette as a sexual appendage.’
    • ‘The desire to do good, to champion the cause of love can become so potent a power in itself that it obliterates the ends.’
    • ‘Even a small dose of alcohol can have a potent effect on a person who is tired.’
    • ‘But outspoken patients can be a potent force, heavily influencing whether a drug or medical device stays or is pulled from the market.’
    • ‘His rolled-up-sleeves, straight talking approach and feisty willingness to speak truth to power is a very potent television image, if handled properly.’
    • ‘Their whole story (all forty years of it) is one massive, powerful, incredibly potent message against taking drugs.’
    • ‘They can be easily slipped into your drink - if it is an alcoholic drink, the effect is more potent.’
    • ‘Instead they can have very real and potent social and political effects.’
    • ‘Moreover, what makes this putative power even more potent is that it is believed to be clandestine and cliquish.’
    • ‘At the time, a new generation of drugs was raising hopes that the potent neurological side effects of older medications could be avoided.’
    • ‘That power is particularly potent when you consider that most of these unions each have well over half a million members and represent a critical segment of America's voter base.’
    • ‘And Errol Flynn in some pirate movie had a very, very potent effect on my 5-year-old imagination, and later fantasy life.’
    • ‘The remedy has a particularly potent curative effect on chronic bronchitis, coughs, and asthma due to excessive phlegm.’
    • ‘These powers can be potent when applied to markets.’
    • ‘Within the media, newspapers remain the most influential and potent sector, the cutting edge, which also happens to be the most accessible to the public.’
    forceful, convincing, cogent, compelling, persuasive, powerful, strong, effective, effectual, eloquent, impressive, telling, sound, well founded, valid, weighty, authoritative, irresistible
    strong, powerful, effective, efficacious
    powerful, strong, vigorous, mighty, formidable, influential, commanding, dominant, forceful, dynamic, redoubtable, overpowering, overwhelming
    View synonyms
  • 2(of a male) able to achieve an erection or to reach an orgasm.

    • ‘A white boy dancer must deliver an impotent, but ironic, rendering of White's (love unlimited) orchestration of potent sexuality.’
    • ‘An aura of potent sexuality seemed to radiate from him.’
    • ‘In the world of shunga, the women are always wet, the men perpetually potent.’
    • ‘The answer lies in the widespread assumption that ‘awakening’ a young lass is the mark of a potent man.’
    • ‘Now our newly potent man starts flaunting his favour and throws his weight around.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin potent- being powerful, being able, from the verb posse.

Pronunciation:

potent

/ˈpəʊt(ə)nt/

Main definitions of potent in English

: potent1potent2

potent2

adjective

Heraldry
  • 1Formed of crutch-shaped pieces; (especially of a cross) having a straight bar across the end of each extremity.

    • ‘The Jerusalem Cross consists of a big cross potent and four smaller ones.’
    • ‘Up to now they had the ‘Or, four pallets Gules, on a bordure Azure crosslets potent Argent’.’
  • 2Of the fur called potent (as a tincture).

    • ‘Potent gules and Or, a triskelion reversed of three armoured legs argent.’

noun

Heraldry
  • [mass noun] Fur resembling vair, but with the alternating pieces T-shaped.

    • ‘Potent is believed to have been originally derived from vair.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting a crutch): alteration of Old French potence crutch, from Latin potentia power (in medieval Latin crutch), from potent- (see potent).

Pronunciation:

potent

/ˈpəʊt(ə)nt/