Definition of postal order in English:

postal order

noun

British
  • An order for payment of a specified sum to a named payee, issued by the Post Office.

    • ‘They stole cash, pension books, tax discs, mobile phone top-up cards and postal orders.’
    • ‘On that occasion the robbers escaped with only £108 in cash, but the box also contained £10,000 of cheques and postal orders.’
    • ‘I will accept cash, cheques drawn against a UK bank, postal orders and payments through PayPal.’
    • ‘He may return their money which was paid by cheque and postal orders.’
    • ‘Other business included payment of pensions, issuing postal orders and, of course, selling stamps.’
    • ‘Some people use the post office to manage bank accounts, pay bills, get postal orders, and, of course, let's not forget wanting to post a letter or buy a stamp.’
    • ‘Cheques and postal orders should be sent to an address in west London.’
    • ‘Today I had to go to the Post Office and buy some postal orders to pay for a visa application (they wouldn't accept an ordinary cheque).’
    • ‘Next morning I take the blue Victoria Line to the other end, to Tottenham to send Sonny some postal orders.’
    • ‘Cash, cheques and postal orders, and debit card payments will be accepted.’
    • ‘One of the ways people could contribute to the cause was to send us cheques and postal orders for any sum from £1.’
    • ‘You could also explain to older children that there are many ways to pay for things without using cash, such as credit cards, cheques and postal orders.’
    • ‘They could be relied upon to ensure birthday cards, postal orders and Highers results got through.’
    • ‘She said: ‘I use this post office every day for postal orders, paying bills or to collect childcare allowance.’’
    • ‘The postal order was bought from a post office in the Tang Hall area of York but there were no details to accompany it.’
    cheque, order, banker's order, money order, bill of exchange
    View synonyms

Pronunciation

postal order