Main definitions of post in English

: post1post2post3

post1

noun

  • 1A long, sturdy piece of timber or metal set upright in the ground and used as a support or marker:

    ‘follow the blue posts until the track meets a road’
    • ‘She got up from the ground shakily and latched onto a post for support.’
    • ‘Determine the length you'll need and purchase a prefabricated metal railing with posts from a lumberyard or home center.’
    • ‘Close boarded fences can be made stylish by adding six-foot square panels of stout trellis, supported on posts of tanalised timber, four inches in diameter.’
    • ‘In the Roman period, below-ground silos are replaced by granaries, often with suspended floors supported on timber or stone posts.’
    • ‘There is barely a scrap of bare metal on the stanchions, pillars, posts, railings, and decking ribs.’
    • ‘Rudy grabbed him on the shoulder and propelled him towards the nearest fence post.’
    • ‘The structure is supported by tall posts rising from the sloping site.’
    • ‘It's also essential that every gate post is complemented with a back-up post for extra support.’
    • ‘What are the advantages and disadvantages of metal posts versus wood posts?’
    • ‘The accident revealed that timber posts supporting the metal barriers were inadequate and even rotten in places.’
    • ‘Today I have been painting the wooden fence post caps we bought about a fortnight ago.’
    • ‘In addition, the mounts are encircled by bands supporting balustered posts, each with a suspension ring.’
    • ‘Adam covered her hand resting on the top fence post with his.’
    • ‘If you are resting the girder on top of the posts, use metal fasteners.’
    • ‘Two panels hang from posts with heavy strap hinges so they can swing open for loading bulky furniture and garden supplies.’
    • ‘Use a brush to paint the posts, horizontal supports, gates, and other hardware to complete each section.’
    • ‘The huts were connected with wooden pathways and rope bridges that were supported by thick posts dug deep into the ground.’
    • ‘He winked at her and led her to a metal post sticking out of the ground.’
    • ‘Pier blocks serve as a transition from the posts supporting the girder to the concrete foundation footings.’
    • ‘The experts reckon the house originally has a thatched or cut wood roof supported by a wattle wall and timber posts.’
    pole, stake, upright, shaft, prop, support, picket, strut, pillar, pale, paling, column, piling, standard, stanchion, pylon, stave, rod, newel, baluster, jamb, bollard, mast
    fence post, gatepost, finger post, king post
    milepost
    palisade
    puncheon, shore
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A goalpost:
      ‘Robertson, at the near post, headed wide’
      • ‘His 55th-minute shot looked destined to nestle in the net - only to rebound back off the near post and to safety.’
      • ‘The ball bobbled viciously as it approached the near post, but Miller adroitly launched himself into its path.’
      • ‘He went round two and under the posts for a try which Smith again improved.’
      • ‘Martin struck the rebound inches wide of the right post when a goal would have been the easier option.’
      • ‘O'Donnell raced in under the posts for a converted try on 60 minutes.’
      • ‘He beat his marker and dribbled into the penalty area but his shot was high and wide of the near post.’
      • ‘When he gets the ball anywhere near the posts, he shoots.’
      • ‘On a good day the kick would have been easy, but the wind blew the ball on to the post to rebound out.’
      • ‘So sure was the midfielder that he had scored, he wheeled away, arm aloft in triumph, but the ball hit a post and rebounded back.’
      • ‘His low cross was met by Martin at the near post, and he touched it over the crossbar.’
      • ‘He opened the scoring after nine minutes, squeezing the ball into the net by the near post.’
      • ‘But poor tackling let Melrose back into the game with a try near the posts.’
      • ‘From the narrowest of angles he took aim at an empty net but saw his shot rebound from the near post.’
      • ‘The ball hit the right-hand post and rebounded into the net, far beyond Butler's despairing dive.’
      • ‘However the goalkeeper's trailing arm got the slightest of touches to deflect the ball wide of the post.’
      • ‘James then raced onto a long ball over the top of the defence, chipped the goalkeeper but could only look on in frustration as the ball rebounded off the post.’
      • ‘Clydebank almost grabbed the lead in the 31st minute when their trialist wriggled free in the box, but he shot inches wide of the near post.’
    2. 1.2the post A starting post or winning post.
      • ‘I think there were people who bet against him yesterday who were cheering him past the post.’
      • ‘Peter O'Sullevan commentated and I still remember that moment as Merryman passed the post.’
      • ‘He enjoyed plenty of success as a jockey but will always be remembered for getting pipped at the Grand National post twice in his riding career.’
      • ‘Does anybody else think the winning jockey's Cheltenham salute as they pass the post is getting beyond the bounds of sensibility and safety?’
      • ‘He got Ocean Silk flying towards the post but it was not enough to peg back the winner.’
      • ‘Lake Austin has never been worse than second in five trips to the post and is exiting a Churchill Downs allowance score.’
      • ‘Ballingarry, third in the Irish Derby and St Leger, strode past the post to take 12 points in the World standings.’
      • ‘By the time Rakti had reached the post yesterday he seemed to have calmed.’
      • ‘He admitted he was relieved to have passed the post first on what will be remembered as one of racing's greatest days.’
      • ‘In the third race the ‘dead cert’ Rooster Booster got pipped at the post.’
      • ‘Points are awarded to the first five horses past the post.’
  • 2A piece of writing, image, or other item of content published online, typically on a blog or social media website or application:

    ‘in a recent post, he cautioned investors to be wary of these predictions’
    • ‘Remember: e-mail and newsgroup posts are not secure venues for volunteering your credit card information.’
    • ‘You are still free to hit the more recent posts with comments though.’
    • ‘I apologise for the lack of preamble to yesterday's last post.’
    • ‘Got my car fixed, for those who have read my previous post on the subject.’
    • ‘Podcasting is a lot more difficult than dashing off a post on a weblog.’
    • ‘My previous post was written in a bad mood (got to stop doing that).’
    • ‘I should be preparing for my meeting with my manager this afternoon, but instead I am setting up email blogging and photo posts!’
    • ‘If my post implied that increasing type size was the automatic solution to issues of readability, then I appreciate your clarification that there are other considerations, as well.’
    • ‘Sure I have real life stuff as well, but I just cannot imagine a time when I could possibly get anywhere near 100 posts in a month.’
    • ‘Anyway, Mark puts a better argument than me so go read his original post.’
    • ‘You can also blog when you don't have a connection and save your post for uploading later.’
    • ‘Yesterday's post reminded me of the issue of pulling the tags off of product and machinery.’
    • ‘My objection was to having to supply my information just to follow your content, which your post implies is necessary.’
    • ‘Over the summer we had a post about the power internet message boards hold over the making of movies.’
    • ‘I think maybe you misread my original post.’
    • ‘There has been numerous posts on this weblog of spammers and virus writers making money out of their criminal activities.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, here's an onion I drew to liven up today's post.’
    • ‘I have a bit of dyslexia and like to take time when composing email, posts, coding, and such to make sure that I don't make a mistake.’
    • ‘We ask them to pay for the infrastructure, which is just a post and software.’
    • ‘Steve's post below reminded me of an article I wrote a couple of years ago.’

Phrases

  • go (or come) to post

    • (of a racehorse) start a race:

      ‘only four of the fifteen entries go to post’
      • ‘The weights will rise by 2lbs if the 11-year-old does not go to post.’
      • ‘Three-year-old filly and older female championship honors are on the line Saturday when eight fillies and mares go to post in the $2-million Breeders' Cup Distaff.’
      • ‘Strong winds and Aintree's quick-draining course saw the going dry up again but rain is predicted to arrive once again before the runners go to post for the big race at 1610 BST.’
      • ‘Young Scotton goes to post in the opening race, the Highland Spring Novices' Hurdle.’
      • ‘To add to the intrigue, all horses must pass a trial jump before going to post.’
      • ‘For the first time since Party Politics won in 1992, a maximum field of 40 would go to post but punters only wanted to know about one horse, the Ted Walsh-trained Papillon.’
      • ‘Only four runners went to post for the H.B.L.H Novices' Chase and the field was quickly reduced when Mr Lewin unseated his rider at the first fence.’
      • ‘The smallest field of the day was the Confined Hunt Race, with five of the six entries going to post.’
      • ‘So the season's superstar went to post at the far end of the Heath yesterday afternoon with a big question mark hanging over his handsome head.’
      • ‘At York, the colt was quietly reintroduced by not passing the noisy stands when going to post.’

Phrasal Verbs

  • post up

    • Play in a position near the basket, along the side of the key:

      ‘Jordan settled for jumpers instead of using his five-inch height advantage to post up’
      • ‘If their big player posts up near the basket, have the defender play in front of the big player.’
      • ‘If someone's posting up and the defender is in the paint in the post-up position, does that count as three seconds?’
      • ‘He lulls defenders by beginning with his back to the basket like he is posting up.’
      • ‘‘I definitely feel more comfortable facing the basket than posting up,’ Brown says.’
      • ‘For example, it's difficult to stop players who post up near the basket.’

Origin

Old English, from Latin postis doorpost, later rod, beam, probably reinforced in Middle English by Old French post pillar, beam and Middle Dutch, Middle Low German post doorpost.

Pronunciation

post

/pəʊst/

Main definitions of post in English

: post1post2post3

post2

noun

  • 1British [mass noun] The official service or system that delivers letters and parcels:

    ‘winners will be notified by post’
    ‘the tickets are in the post’
    • ‘The winners will be notified by post and all results will be published in the Westmorland Messenger.’
    • ‘England has persuaded itself it invented the letter post.’
    • ‘Sending them by post was a service that has won much appreciation from people.’
    • ‘If any grades finally are changed as a result of being reviewed, schools and colleges will be notified by post by next Tuesday.’
    • ‘Service by post on the Second Defendant was not permitted.’
    • ‘An elderly man had to wait nearly eight weeks to see a doctor after his medical records were lost in the post in the latest in a series of post service blunders.’
    • ‘Rule 99 makes it plain that section 8 is subject to the provisions for service by post.’
    • ‘Applicants will be selected at random from cheques received and notified by post.’
    • ‘Sackloads of bulbs were delivered by post and by hand.’
    • ‘I will provide a doctor's certificate by post, which will confirm my current state of health.’
    • ‘Applicants will be selected at random from cheques and notified by post.’
    • ‘The winners will be the first entries drawn and will be notified by post.’
    • ‘If I send a gift by post, the Post Office supply the service of delivery of the parcel for me, not for the addressee who knows nothing of the transaction.’
    • ‘The vouchers will go out to more than 2,000 children in the area, most of whom can look forward to a special delivery by post over the next few days.’
    • ‘I was attracted by this submission, which seems to me to gain some force from the provisions relating to service by post.’
    • ‘The winners will be notified by post and names will be published in the Gazette on December 10.’
    • ‘The solicitor sent such a letter by ordinary first-class post on 3 August.’
    • ‘As the number of people registered to vote by post has soared, election fraud is now a huge fear…’
    • ‘And that could sound the death knell for Britain's universal post service.’
    • ‘First-class post services in York have improved, despite problems across the region as Royal Mail failed to meet a raft of targets.’
    1. 1.1 Letters and parcels delivered:
      ‘she was opening her post’
      • ‘Royal Mail managers were drafted to deliver post to thousands of other homes after the workers voted to continue their stoppage.’
      • ‘Now she has had the front door replaced without a letterbox and her post is delivered to the Post Office in Bingley.’
      • ‘This also had the consequence in many of the affected post offices of delaying post by an hour or more.’
      • ‘A York resident today slammed the Royal Mail for delivering her post seven hours later than it used to.’
      • ‘These days there's a fish farm, post is delivered by van, McCabe's is a seasonal guest house and the pub has gone.’
      • ‘Priority is being given to business mail with the aim of having all such post delivered by 10 am.’
      • ‘The system, which scanned post and official documents so they could be fired off to the relevant people, worked fantastically on one computer.’
      • ‘The Royal Mail has told him they would continue to deliver his post when they were able to do so.’
      • ‘The post was largely not delivered, with an official total of 46 percent of workers on strike.’
      • ‘The people plan to stick a label across their letter boxes and decline post as part of their campaign of boycott.’
      • ‘Customers could set their watches by the times their post was delivered and the service they received was second to none.’
      • ‘Royal Mail could have to make sure all post is delivered before noon and customers never wait more than five minutes in Post Office queues.’
      letters, cards, correspondence
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2[in singular] A single collection or delivery of mail:
      ‘entries must be received no later than first post on 14 June’
      • ‘Even the poor postman was baffled when he came to collect the post only to discover that the postbox had apparently disappeared into thin air.’
      • ‘For inclusion on Saturday, letters should reach us by first post on Tuesday, and may be edited’
      • ‘We will accept returns completed on a printed copy of the form if you post them by last post on Wednesday 30 January.’
    3. 1.3 Used in names of newspapers:
      ‘the Washington Post’
      • ‘This was covered by The Sunday Business Post in last week's Money pages.’
      • ‘The correspondence was obtained by The Sunday Business Post under the Freedom of Information Act.’
      • ‘He won a Pulitzer Prize for a series he wrote for the Post on the West Point class of 1966.’
      • ‘On the up were the Irish Times, the Sunday Business Post and Ireland on Sunday.’
      • ‘The winner will be announced in The Sunday Business Post on February 18.’
      • ‘His cartoons have also appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post and Saturday Review.’
      • ‘The group contains the Daily and Sunday Telegraphs, the Spectator, the Chicago Sun-Times and the Jerusalem Post.’
      • ‘Purdy of The Denver Post is the fifth winner of the Aldo Leopold Award for Distinguished Editorial Writing.’
      • ‘Nice article in the Washington Post on white South Africans going to Soweto.’
      • ‘The Editor, Yorkshire Post, Wellington Street, Leeds LS1 1RF.’
      • ‘This autumn, we are publishing a book, Reporting Yorkshire: 250 Years of the Yorkshire Post.’
      • ‘Competing with the Weekender for that honour is The Dominion Post, Morgantown, West Virginia, USA.’
      • ‘Only two turned up - from The Daily Telegraph and The Sunday Post.’
      • ‘This led to coverage by National Public Radio, The Washington Post, and ABC News.’
      • ‘Consider the case of The Asian Wall Street Journal compared to South China Morning Post.’
      • ‘Her work has also appeared in The New York Times, The New York Post, Wired, Money and TV Guide.’
      • ‘Finally, some news just in about The Sunday Business Post's New Year's Political Quiz.’
      • ‘No one at the Post, the Times, ABC, or NBC is doing the same for Fox's journalists.’
  • 2historical Each of a series of couriers who carried mail on horseback between fixed stages.

    1. 2.1archaic A person or vehicle that carries mail.

Phrases

  • keep someone posted

    • Keep someone informed of the latest developments or news:

      ‘I'll keep you posted on his progress’
      • ‘Thank God the networks are keeping us posted on groundbreaking news, I thought.’
      • ‘It has come about as a result of continually talking to clients and keeping them posted as events developed.’
      • ‘We wish the lads the very best and we'll keep you posted on developments.’
      • ‘We'll keep you posted on any possible additional developments.’
      • ‘If there's any more news on that I'll keep you posted.’
      • ‘I shall keep you posted if I hear of any interesting developments.’
      • ‘We'll keep you posted on the latest news and thanks for your support!’
      • ‘If there are computers there, I'll keep you posted with news of my high jinks and frolics.’
      • ‘And we'll keep you posted on all developments as they come in.’
      • ‘I hadn't seen Richard since Terry's wedding, but my friends had kept me posted on all the news that went on while I was gone.’
      keep informed, inform, keep up to date, keep in the picture, keep briefed, brief, give someone the latest information, update, fill in, let someone know, advise, notify, apprise, report to
      clue in, keep up to speed
      View synonyms

Origin

Early 16th century (in sense 2 of the noun): from French poste, from Italian posta, from a contraction of Latin posita, feminine past participle of ponere to place.

Pronunciation

post

/pəʊst/

Main definitions of post in English

: post1post2post3

post3

noun

  • 1A position of paid employment; a job:

    ‘he resigned from the post of Foreign Minister’
    ‘a teaching post’
    • ‘I call on him to quit smoking immediately or resign his cabinet post.’
    • ‘He also wants to bag the post of deputy chief minister for the party.’
    • ‘He held various ministerial posts, and from 1983 supervised the organization of the 1988 Olympic Games.’
    • ‘Seventy-one vacant posts have not been filled following lengthy negotiations between the unions and city finance chiefs.’
    • ‘This year 55,000 teaching assistant posts are to be abolished.’
    • ‘Ralph asked me to resign my full-time post and be his assistant, because he needed someone.’
    • ‘Under Sri Lanka's executive presidential system, the post of prime minister is largely ceremonial.’
    • ‘Thereafter he was much occupied by the post of Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.’
    • ‘He appointed two opposition parliamentarians to fill vacant cabinet posts.’
    • ‘The filling of those posts was now nearing completion.’
    • ‘Although there are lofty goals and a variety of future plans, some faculty members believe it will not be enough to create equal gender representation at top posts in the near future.’
    • ‘This year alone the university has lost eight senior managers, there has been no permanent finance officer in post for months and the university has failed to recruit to senior posts.’
    • ‘In 1890 he resigned his teaching post and took up full-time technical training.’
    • ‘Cabinet ministers have had four or more years in post to get a grip of their portfolios and to make an impact.’
    • ‘A change at the post of U.S. secretary of state is always big news.’
    • ‘Most of the top administrative posts have been held by officials from outside the province.’
    • ‘In July it was estimated that at least 400 teacher and teaching assistant posts will be lost in the Yorkshire region over the next year because of cash shortages.’
    • ‘Any who were employed were usually in the lowest paid posts and in jobs that had little prospect of professional progress.’
    • ‘In addition, a position allowance is typically paid to employees holding formal supervisory posts in the firm.’
    • ‘He needs professional experience but won't be offered a paid post in Scotland without professional experience.’
  • 2A place where someone is on duty or where a particular activity is carried out:

    ‘a shift worker asleep at his post’
    ‘a customs post’
    • ‘Just beyond the customs post is a sprawling underground shopping mall that is the visitor's introduction to the new China.’
    • ‘Alongwith discharging his duties on different posts at different places, he continued his literary pursuits also.’
    • ‘In July 1798 French customs posts were established along the Rhine.’
    • ‘All who have work to do, whether manual, clerical or professional, should regard it as their duty to remain at their posts, and do their part in carrying on the life of the nation.’
    • ‘Over 300, he said, some for desertion, some for cowardice, and two for falling asleep at their posts.’
    • ‘But last week travellers set up their homes on the site while the duty guard left his post to take a break for lunch.’
    • ‘They inhabit posts in front of road signs pointing to directionless highways.’
    1. 2.1 A place where a soldier or police officer is stationed or which they patrol:
      ‘he gave the men orders not to leave their posts’
      • ‘Some distance away, Renee could see a group of soldiers running to their posts.’
      • ‘High ranking police officers, in charge of police stations and posts and other policemen took part in the camp.’
      • ‘There are up to 150 military posts with at least 25 soldiers stationed at each post.’
      • ‘The lookout post at Newtownhamilton police station would also be closed.’
      • ‘In an unrelated matter, three of the five police constables who were transferred from the western division have not taken up duty at their assigned posts.’
      • ‘When no one answered the telephones in these deserted command posts there was understandable alarm.’
      • ‘When the regime fell, soldiers simply left their posts and ran home, many with as much armament as they could carry.’
      • ‘It appears the security officers on duty left their post to investigate those first two explosions.’
      • ‘In the provinces, customs workers left their posts at the border with Paraguay.’
      • ‘Is that not an act of treason to go into a combat-heavy country and entice soldiers into leaving their posts?’
      • ‘But another officer pleaded with him to stay at his post, carry on with his work, put his friend out of his mind.’
      • ‘Some trucks with equipment and a few dozen soldiers from several posts headed eastwards.’
      • ‘The other soldiers left their posts and huddled around the nuke.’
      • ‘Investigations continue to see whether other police officers deserted their posts during the height of that disaster.’
      • ‘Robert, my brother, used to tell me that a good soldier never leaves his post to fight a battle elsewhere.’
      • ‘In the subsequent period, they began to be integrated with the observation and surveillance posts of other branches of service.’
      • ‘It is not impossible to either fake travel permits or bribe the soldiers at control posts.’
      • ‘Order will break down in many countries as soldiers and police abandon their posts in order to avoid exposure to the virus.’
      • ‘Abandoning a post, drinking on duty and brawling in public are all serious offences in the Garda discipline code.’
      • ‘Plus, all soldiers bound for posts in Germany process through there.’
    2. 2.2North American A force stationed at a permanent position or camp; a garrison.
      • ‘A final series of surrenders followed as hungry Lakota bands capitulated at military posts along the upper Missouri and Yellowstone.’
      • ‘The military said soldiers fired at two armed men who were approaching an army post.’
      • ‘They deliberately point pursuers toward nearby posts and garrisons of other federal troops.’
      • ‘The bill also would relax some environmental restrictions at military posts, allowing troops to train in areas previously off limits.’
      • ‘Nonetheless, a few Indiana regiments from posts in Tennessee and Kentucky did return home for the state election.’
      • ‘As secretary of war in the Taft administration, he visited the army posts of the Old West in the last years of their existence.’
      • ‘Usually in the forefront of expansion are the sites of military posts and encampments that protected advancing explorers or soldiers.’
      • ‘In Oregon, the United States established military posts in 1864 at Camp Alvord and in 1867 at Fort Harney.’
      • ‘Steagall had campaigned hard for an army post to be located in his Depression-ravaged home district.’
      • ‘There is a requirement for a summer camp of six weeks between the junior and senior year of college conducted at a military post, camp, or station.’
      • ‘The QRF teams respond to potential threats and force protection situations local to their assigned posts.’
      • ‘The story seemed to be all over the place, on cattle ranches and in mining camps, at military posts and isolated homesteads.’
    3. 2.3US A local group in an organization of military veterans.
  • 3historical The status or rank of full-grade captain in the Royal Navy:

    ‘Captain Miller was made post in 1796’

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French poste, from Italian posto, from a contraction of popular Latin positum, neuter past participle of ponere to place.

Pronunciation

post

/pəʊst/