Definition of post-classical in English:

post-classical

adjective

  • Relating to or denoting a time after the classical period of any language, art, or culture, in particular in ancient Greek and Latin culture.

    ‘post-classical law’
    ‘a post-classical text’
    • ‘Thus the use of the Troy myth by post-classical writers should not be compared to Virgil's use of the myth, even though Virgil's use of ancient Roman myth is the chief source of the cultural-genealogical practice.’
    • ‘The object has onyx handles with cylindrical finger grips echoing post-classical pre-Columbian motifs.’
    • ‘Yet this view leaves open the historical determinations of intention and form (choice and chance if you prefer) which underpin the framework of reading at any post-classical moment.’
    • ‘Under an Hour is a three-piece post-classical mirage of repetition and withdrawal.’
    • ‘Alberti mentions only one post-classical work of art - Giotto's Navicella mosaic - but he cites many classical literary sources describing vanished works.’
    • ‘The school where he taught before being raised to the bishopric of St Davids, seems to have boasted a considerable library of Latin classical and post-classical authors.’
    • ‘Ehlers may alienate those uninterested in being taken on a tour through dissonant post-classical territories, preferring instead a stay in pleasanter climes.’
    • ‘It contains thirty-two poems, of which twenty-six are in hexameters, the standard metre for post-classical Greek encomiastic poetry.’
    • ‘A particularly common theme in post-classical art is ‘The Toilet of Venus’, showing her with Eros, her son by the war-god Ares, holding up a mirror in which she can admire her own beauty.’
    • ‘The standard Latin dictionary (Lewis and Short) in fact points out that the word Graecitas does not occur until the post-classical period.’
    • ‘Fuchs is a representative of both Berlin's classical and its post-classical era.’
    • ‘Among British post-classical economists, the argument was often that the Irish over-breed, while Anglo-Saxons reproduce at relatively low rates.’

Pronunciation:

post-classical

/pəʊs(t)ˈklasɪk(ə)l/