Definition of post-and-rail tea in English:

post-and-rail tea

noun

mass nounAustralian
informal
  • Coarse tea of inferior quality, containing a large proportion of stalks and other woody fragments.

    ‘they live on an unchanging diet of mutton chops and post-and-rail tea’
    • ‘This is post-and-rail tea, brewed in an old blackened billy.’
    • ‘There were steaming cauldrons of thoroughly stewed post and rail tea.’
    • ‘They were called to a breakfast of greasy chops and post-and-rail tea.’
    • ‘He was waited upon by a constable, who cooked his convict ration of beef, bread, and potatoes, and, I suppose, made his post and rail tea sweetened with brown sugar.’
    • ‘I didn't feel inclined for corned beef and damper, and post-and-rail tea.’

Origin

Mid 19th century: a humorous analogy drawn between the fibrous nature of the tea's contents and timber used for fencing.