Definition of portent in English:

portent

noun

  • 1A sign or warning that a momentous or calamitous event is likely to happen.

    ‘many birds are regarded as being portents of death’
    • ‘For someone who was chosen shortly after birth by means of a variety of signs and portents few of us would set any store by in ordinary circumstances, he's an extraordinarily wise human being and a powerful force for good.’
    • ‘But signs and portents certainly suggest this power surge could help manifest something you've always wanted.’
    • ‘We're not there yet but the signs and portents are mounting up.’
    • ‘The confluence of events was an ominous portent for Newman.’
    • ‘In general I do not think of myself as a particularly superstitious person, but then things like this happen and I realize I am constantly on the look out for signs and portents in the world around me.’
    • ‘We've been reading the tea leaves and rolling the bones, and the signs and portents tell us, something totally wicked this way comes.’
    • ‘Particularly for growth companies, the signs and portents were mixed even prior to the attacks on September 11, and since then they've grown only murkier.’
    • ‘The artist began to feel a general unease as things that happened and things he saw seemed to be signs and portents of some great event.’
    • ‘There is a scent of change in the air, as a devastated people eagerly interpret the smallest of signs as portents of a new beginning.’
    • ‘Biblical preaching calls us to pay attention to the portents of death masquerading as success and the tokens of resurrection hope in the midst of despair.’
    • ‘Short of slaughtering a wild animal and rummaging about in its entrails, every sign, portent and augury had been examined beforehand.’
    • ‘The signs and portents are not very positive, however.’
    • ‘The devastation wreaked by Hurricane Katrina, with hundreds killed, is likely a portent of worse to come in a warming world.’
    • ‘Interpreting deformities as portents or signs of divine displeasure continued well into the sixteenth century.’
    • ‘Don't you think that this event is a portent of things to come soon too?’
    • ‘The major labor market problems faced by out-of-school youth during the 1990s carry portents for likely developments as their numbers increase in the years ahead.’
    • ‘These were signs and portents, she realized, visitations and apparitions from a tangled mess of folklore, some unrecognizable and others merely silly.’
    • ‘Oblivious to the signs and portents that he's making a very big mistake, he takes the job.’
    • ‘Alec, despite his grounding in the rational science of making lots of money, is swayed by symbols and portents, seemingly mundane signs that he interprets superstitiously to be indicators of the path he is meant to pursue.’
    • ‘I thought of how, in Tibetan Buddhism, tigers are symbols of strength and compassion, sometimes also portents of death.’
    omen, sign, indication, presage, warning, forewarning, harbinger, augury, signal, promise, threat, menace, ill omen, forecast, prediction, prognostication, prophecy, straw in the wind, writing on the wall, hint, auspice
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    1. 1.1mass noun Future significance.
      ‘an omen of grave portent for the tribe’
      • ‘For 24 years these words carried with them a chilling, murderous portent.’
      • ‘Beginnings and endings, the dual portals of narrative, are often charged with portent and revelation.’
      • ‘A far more chilling episode, little remarked and with even graver portent for the future of the democratic process, occurred on November 12.’
      • ‘To my mind, the sight of a bored animal locked in a cage holds way too much portent with respect to most relationships to be an image one would want to introduce so early in the dating game.’
      • ‘But sweeping narrative is not Leaf's style; instead, she represents incisive moments, many of them funny, some harrowing, and all equally free of portent and nostalgia.’
      • ‘Now an even greater silence filled the air, filled with portent and emotion.’
      • ‘On the eve of my first day of paid post-university employment she rang me up and in a voice dripping with portent, said: ‘Listen, I want to tell you something.’’
      • ‘If you believe that fundamentals eventually catch up to market behavior, this is not a particularly good portent for stocks going forward.’
      • ‘It's a clumsy, unnecessary portent of doom, both for Gilda's life and for the next two hours of watching a clumsy and unnecessary movie.’
      • ‘This paragraph is laden with portent and grim irony.’
      • ‘When the building is evacuated, she stays behind unnoticed and overhears a conversation of sinister portent in her native Ku tongue on the microphone system.’
      • ‘His opening cadenza is filled with tension and dark portent, and his tempos, as usual, are well judged.’
      • ‘I arrived home with renewed determination, I was going to study and make the heavy feeling of dread and portent disappear.’
      • ‘It's birthday week so everything seems meaningful and full of portent.’
      • ‘I cannot express strongly enough how horrified I am at what has happened and its evil and terrifying portent for the future.’
      • ‘The tender attention paid by the wife to her husband's body, the detailed steps of her betrayal, and the subtle note of portent, all serve to heighten the drama.’
      • ‘A late-night ambiance of portent and dread permeates the music, deepened by the combustible dimension of the band's playing, a tense containment that threatens to explode at any moment.’
      • ‘I sit on a bentwood chair in a patch of sunlight as if I'm in a single spot, centre of a dim-lit stage, shadow-filled with movement and with portent.’
      • ‘Not your typical hardcore-punk funfest, this one comes heavily laden with socio-political portent.’
      • ‘That's how the album was received on its release in November 1975: as beacon, portent, and catalyst.’
      significance, importance, import, consequence, meaning, meaningfulness, moment, momentousness, weight, weightiness, cruciality
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  • 2literary An exceptional or wonderful person or thing.

    ‘what portent can be greater than a pious notary?’

Origin

Late 16th century: from Latin portentum ‘omen, token’, from the verb portendere (see portend).

Pronunciation

portent

/ˈpɔːtɛnt//ˈpɔːt(ə)nt/