Main definitions of pore in English

: pore1pore2

pore1

noun

  • A minute opening in a surface, especially the skin or integument of an organism, through which gases, liquids, or microscopic particles may pass.

    • ‘Stomata are minute pores in the surface of leaves through which water vapor and gases, including carbon dioxide, pass.’
    • ‘Skin cleansing products help remove dirt and germs from the skin surface and pores.’
    • ‘The sebum flows through a narrow follicular canal or duct and empties onto the surface of the skin through a pore or opening.’
    • ‘It is also noteworthy that the cell surfaces are pocked with pores which pass to the interior.’
    • ‘If the opening of the skin pore is sealed off from air, the result is a whitehead.’
    opening, orifice, aperture, hole, outlet, inlet, vent
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French, via Latin from Greek poros ‘passage, pore’.

Pronunciation

pore

/pɔː/

Main definitions of pore in English

: pore1pore2

pore2

verb

[no object]pore over/through
  • 1Be absorbed in reading or studying (something)

    ‘I spent hours poring over cookery books’
    • ‘Mick Wilson suggests a strategy of active reading that means poring over material three times.’
    • ‘They watched the video on a large screen and spent hours poring over every detail.’
    • ‘Lawmakers had only four hours to pore through 770 pages.’
    • ‘I remember spending hours in the library poring over orders of the Court.’
    • ‘But he had fantastic photo albums of his travels all over Southeast Asia, and I used to pore over them for hours.’
    • ‘I spent hours in libraries, poring over microfilms and data and also travelled to Ayodhya.’
    • ‘After hours poring over the documents I think it entirely justifiable to argue that one man acted as an agent provocateur.’
    • ‘I remember taking the album and poring over it, examining it for every detail.’
    • ‘Long were the hours spent poring over the maps they thoughtfully provided.’
    • ‘You could spend hours poring over the strips, and still find new things to see.’
    • ‘Once back home, he'd spend hours in his room poring over those recordings.’
    • ‘Brian and his wife Theresa have spend endless hours poring through this vast accumulation of negatives before eventually settling on the photographs that they would use in the exhibition.’
    • ‘These were the studies that Nathan pored through, experimenting with different food combinations, monitoring his blood chemistry and keeping detailed records of his findings.’
    • ‘Each bird that appeared was a challenge to name; I studied them thoroughly and pored over my field guides.’
    • ‘They have pored through studies conducted over 85 years of psychological research.’
    • ‘For hours, they pore over the books, consult each other in hushed Gujarati, then write things on the forms, filling them up and starting on new ones.’
    • ‘It is a kind of reading that invites poring over the visual to ponder spatial and material decisions.’
    • ‘This has been exacerbated by having to pore over 75 hours of footage.’
    • ‘I would pore over these for hours on end seeking connection, any connection, with his world.’
    • ‘Why, after a few hours poring through recent news reports I have become deeply afraid of how really gosh darn-dead you're gonna get if you don't drink more.’
    • ‘They went to Bali together last month, and I am certain not too much time was spent poring over Bible passages there.’
    study, read intently, peruse, be absorbed in, scrutinize, scan, examine, go over, go through
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1archaic Think intently; ponder.
      ‘he has thought and pored on it’
      • ‘Some years ago, while poring among the items on offer at a stoop sale in Brooklyn, I came across a copy of the thirteenth printing of The Great Crash by John Kenneth Galbraith.’
      • ‘Drea was poring silently over the books around her.’
      • ‘She indulged his taste for draughtsmanship - the two pored together for hours over architectural drawings.’
      • ‘In my house, as in many other households, there was a multivolume pictorial history of the war, over which I pored for entire mornings or afternoons, until I knew every picture by heart.’
      • ‘Despite his age, Greenspan is still said to be enthralled by the statistics over which he has pored for many years.’

Usage

People frequently confuse the verbs pore and pour. Pore is used with over or through and means ‘be absorbed in reading something’ (I spent hours poring over cookery books), while pour means ‘flow or cause to flow in a steady stream’ (water poured off the stones pour the marinade over the pork pour the tea). As pore is a much less common word, people often choose the more familiar pour, producing sentences such as she was pouring over books and studying till midnight. Although increasingly common, this use is incorrect in standard English

Origin

Middle English: perhaps related to peer.

Pronunciation

pore

/pɔː/