Definition of poppa in English:

poppa

noun

North american
  • [as name] ‘oh, Poppa will be pleased’
    informal term for father
    • ‘I tried to escape, but they ran me down with an ambulance and then the man who brought me out of my poppa's house came by with flowers.’
    • ‘Just because my poppa thinks you're the best thing since seal fat doesn't mean I have to like you.’
    • ‘The kids were asleep, the house a tip after a 10-hour marathon of sheet-changing, brow-mopping and providing endless supplies of cool drinks and constant assurances that poppa was on his way.’
    • ‘They would have their time with poppa painting.’
    • ‘Instead, she carried on with the traditions they had developed while poppa was alive and to this day, cites her greatest achievement as having raised a healthy young man who went on to attend an Ivy League university.’
    • ‘She smiled at Kurt and said softly, ‘Babies always look like their poppas.’’
    • ‘After a matter of several minutes, four-year old Sean Pearce Nelson became bored and suddenly decided that he needed his Poppa in the room with him to build a giant octopus or some such monster that his poppa studied in his laboratory.’
    • ‘How on earth will you become a doctor to help your mumma and poppa when you grow up and get out of this house?’
    • ‘There are few surprises, but that's no bother when you have the chance to get momma or poppa what they really want, and what they want is always simple: books, videos, DVDs, vouchers, chocolate (not all at once, I might add!)’
    • ‘She had her picture taken with her poppa before she left home.’
    • ‘Are you trying to tell me who your poppa should be?’
    • ‘Once he reached a situation where he would actually stand to make money in the profession and he was truly happy, then he should have told momma and poppa.’
    • ‘A proud poppa, he displays his many children around the swimming pool.’
    • ‘But the poor fellow is having trouble with his step-daughter who prefers strolling on the boatdeck with shipmate Ham to doing the chores for poppa.’
    • ‘Give poppa a hug and send some more money this way.’
    • ‘Over 50 years, we watch Andy grow from being a staid, simple, Catholic poppa's boy, to being a staid, simple Massachusetts senator with a frightening resemblance to John Kerry.’
    • ‘No wonder momma and poppa won't let me play here.’
    • ‘At poppa's funeral, his son would learn that the elder architect had three families going at once, none of which knew about the others.’
    • ‘It seems proud poppas are the same the world over.’

Origin

Late 19th century: alteration of papa.

Pronunciation:

poppa

/ˈpɒpə/