Definition of poplar in English:

poplar

noun

  • 1A tall, fast-growing tree of north temperate regions, widely grown in shelter belts and for timber and pulp.

    • ‘Tulip poplars are difficult to grow from seed, but director Jeff Meyer managed to get 14 healthy seedlings.’
    • ‘Birches, tulip poplars, and hickories, are yellow in the fall.’
    • ‘Notably, poplars and other cottonwood trees need moist soil and prefer riparian zones near streams and lakes.’
    • ‘Hurricane Hugo had just come through, leveling the tulip poplars and other trees that had obstructed a view of the town and the Virginia mountains in the distance.’
    • ‘Apple, willow, birch, poplar, citrus, alder and maple are varieties we have used.’
    • ‘The trees include willow, cherry, poplar, acers, larch, ash, birch, sycamore, elder and sitka spruce.’
    • ‘The Asian longhorned beetle that invaded New York in 1996 has since killed thousands of the state's hardwood trees, including maples, elms, willows, and poplars.’
    • ‘There were twenty-one poplars, silver maples and white birch and a large number of saplings and brush removed.’
    • ‘The beetles' affinity for certain trees, like maples, poplars, willows, and elms, is significant because such attractive species may be used as sentinel trees.’
    • ‘Among the 68 trees to be cut are American elms, sycamores, tulip poplars, a couple of Yoshino cherries, a dogwood, and one cucumber magnolia.’
    • ‘They use invader species of trees - eucalyptus, poplar, pine and cedar - to produce exciting wooden pots and other forms of art.’
    • ‘The poplar and willow trees line the opposite bank of the River Kennet from the Town Mill homes.’
    • ‘In Prussia the coal of the alder, limetree, poplar, elder, willow, hemp, and hazel is used for powder.’
    • ‘At a height of 19 metres and 22 metres, the poplar and ginkgo trees have been standing there for over 200 years.’
    • ‘This is not an exhaustive list of places in the book, but I would suggest that these poems arise from these places and are rooted in these places just as day lilies or tulip poplars are rooted in the places from which they spring.’
    • ‘Root competition from the huge tulip poplars, ashes, and sweet gum trees contributes significantly to the parched soil conditions.’
    • ‘Upstairs, corner windows in bedrooms give more sweeping views of the property's black cherry trees, poplars and white pines.’
    • ‘Along many canals, settlers had planted native cottonwood trees or imported species, like poplars, salt cedars, and pecans, at regular intervals.’
    • ‘The most common forms included beech-like trees, poplars, willows, cattails, sumac, soapberry, and conifers such as pines, sequoias, and false cypress.’
    • ‘Rosemary, thyme, blackberry bushes and wild flowers abound near the river banks, shadowed by poplars and pine trees.’
  • 2

    North American term for tulip tree

Origin

Middle English: from Old French poplier, from Latin populus ‘poplar’.

Pronunciation

poplar

/ˈpɒplə/