Definition of poodle in English:



  • 1A dog of a breed (of which there are several varieties) with a curly coat that is often ornamentally clipped. Poodle breeds are classified by size: see standard poodle, miniature poodle, toy poodle.

    • ‘Dy Witt has shown, bred and trained standard poodles for 25 years.’
    • ‘A woman walked past me, leading a miniature poodle with a tartan coat.’
    • ‘She bred poodles and even brought one round for my children but I didn't want it.’
    • ‘The second defendant has said that there are 18 dogs on the premises including five adult shepherd dogs, one poodle and the rest are adult dachshunds.’
    • ‘Some of the dog breeds with the ability to signal an epileptic seizure include, the poodle, German shepherd, golden retriever, and the Rottweiler.’
    • ‘The most popular breed of designer dog is the Labradoodle - originally a cross between a Labrador retriever and a poodle.’
    • ‘Make room for doodles, the latest designer dogs - a mix of a poodle with another breed.’
    • ‘Gypsies prefer small and very little dogs, such as toy poodles and Chihuahuas, which can share the cart with their masters.’
    • ‘To the one on her right, Louise said, no, she would not sit for his dog - a taffy-toned poodle with a puppy cut that answered to the name of Roy.’
    • ‘We don't want our nation overrun by a host of poodles, corgis or pit bull terriers.’
    • ‘Among the Alsatians and poodles in the household dogs section at the Walter Rothschild Museum in Tring stands Mick the Miller, the world's most famous greyhound.’
    • ‘Children make these cognitive leaps by noticing coincidences - Labradors and poodles and other dogs bark, pant with their tongues on hot days and, in cities at least, appear on leashes led by humans.’
    • ‘Other tests in development include one for progressive blindness which afflicts a number of breeds, including poodles.’
    • ‘Babe brings together dogs and cats, pink poodles and pit bulls.’
    • ‘Avoid environmental offending agents such as rugs, cats, dogs (although some dogs such as poodles and Yorkies are ok) and feather pillows.’
    • ‘To ease her loneliness, she also spent a lot of time with her French poodle and dachshund.’
    • ‘The dogs included shih-tzus, dachshunds, Lhasa apsos, bearded collies, corgis, chihuahuas, poodles, Pekinese and Yorkshire terriers.’
    • ‘The poodle, Bedlington terrier, and Kerry blue terrier have long, wooly or coarse coats that tend to shed less.’
    • ‘The dachshunds, terriers and poodles of the world have waged a high-tech war against the Siamese, Persian and tabbies.’
    • ‘Animal salons shape dogs into brilliantly hued canine topiaries; orange and pink are the most popular colors, especially for poodles whose dyed coats complement their owners' wardrobes.’
  • 2British A person or organization who is overly willing to obey another.

    ‘the council is being made a poodle of central government’
    • ‘Because he's been such a toy poodle for corporations that now are proving to be systemically corrupt, Harvey's been taking heat, including bipartisan demands that he resign.’
    • ‘He has resisted efforts by Labour ministers to stop him acting like America's poodle - or at least to hide it better.’
    • ‘Why don't you and your poodle of a Foreign Minister try setting up a democracy with individual liberties in, say, France first.’
    • ‘This decision was taken by a small number of New Labour poodles.’
    • ‘Parsons said recently that he has seen the committee described as ‘the pampered poodles of the management board’ and he had found himself unable to disagree with that phrase.’
    • ‘In James Naughtie's book, far from being America's poodle, the British Prime Minister emerges as America's Alsatian, a watchdog which forewarns of danger and then helps combat it.’
    • ‘Reading this front page coverage makes me wonder if he knows the issues or if he is merely a press poodle for the politician.’
    • ‘Particularly stinging is the… suggestion that the government has been playing poodle to its American masters.’
    • ‘She knows that going into government as Fianna Fáil poodle would be even more damaging than being stuck out on the wilderness of the Opposition benches.’
    • ‘I'm tired, and a lot of others are tired, of people like Mr. Keene and his Raleigh lap poodle Mike Regan using our religion for political purposes.’
    • ‘When the poodle gets out of politics, they should start measuring his neck.’
    • ‘The clean, dry perfumes of newsprint, ink and decent analysis are replaced by the whiff of political poodles marking their territories.’
    • ‘He steadfastly maintained his independence and never allowed the Bank to become a poodle of political causes.’
    • ‘It is well known that the US government - like that of her British poodle - favour universities as a method of recruiting spies.’
    • ‘From this perspective, however, his appointment came at a sensitive time - in the week that Labour was lambasted for replacing tough committee chairpersons with poodles.’
    • ‘Symbian's rivals have been tagging the company as Nokia's poodle for a couple of years now, and the deal is being widely seen as confirmation.’
    • ‘Blair, content with a kennel full of poodles in the Commons, will never allow such a thing.’
    • ‘Away with talk of poodles, leave that to the Government.’
    • ‘But secondly, with the SNP continually waiting the chance to describe him as London's poodle, there is the political imperative for him to do so, in order to prove them wrong.’
    • ‘More worryingly, perhaps he did not know the actual cause for the delays when he ranted about ‘political poodles.’’
    subordinate, deputy, auxiliary, second, second in command, number two, lieutenant, right-hand man, right-hand woman, wingman, aide, personal assistant, pa, attendant, mate, apprentice, junior
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[NO OBJECT]British
  • Move or travel in a leisurely manner.

    ‘the chap who just wants to poodle along the road at 50 mph’
    • ‘And now I'm just poodling around until the dance tonight.’
    • ‘Spent the day sleeping, reading comics, forgetting I'd read them, and poodling around on the computer.’
    • ‘Even now, with the incredibly busy life I lead, if I get time between appointments I will just go and poodle.’


Early 19th century: from German Pudel(hund), from Low German pud(d)eln splash in water (the poodle being a water-dog).