Main definitions of pontoon in English

: pontoon1pontoon2

pontoon1

noun

  • 1A flat-bottomed boat or hollow metal cylinder used with others to support a temporary bridge or floating landing stage.

    [as modifier] ‘a pontoon bridge’
    • ‘Floating pontoons, with their massing and design, ‘cannot contribute in the same way and constitute an intrusive feature in such a sensitive location’.’
    • ‘During a 30-hour river closure, winch wires were being secured to both banks of the river and used to tow the floating pontoon on which the bridge rested.’
    • ‘A floating pontoon bridge links each side of the city but this has been relegated to pedestrian traffic since they built a spectacular motorway road bridge, which now dominates the skyline.’
    • ‘The Marines began laying their own pontoon bridge to carry over their heaviest trucks.’
    • ‘In the early morning of 11 December, Burnside's engineers began laying pontoon bridges.’
    1. 1.1A bridge or landing stage supported by pontoons.
      • ‘Other concepts include wind and submarine cars with the latter docking onto floating pontoons.’
      • ‘We trundled off, hiked up a steep incline of jagged coral, past poisonous trees and cat-sized frogs, and ended up at an unprepossessing wooden pontoon at the edge of a vast lake.’
      • ‘If true, this could persuade the EU to pay for a Hungarian operation to lift the wreckage - and possibly for a high-level bridge to replace the Novi Sad pontoon.’
      • ‘He sets up a typewriter on a rickety wooden pontoon and moodily bashes away, staring out over the lake.’
      • ‘The creak of the wooden pontoon was such a sad, lonely sound.’
    2. 1.2Each of a pair of floats fitted to an aircraft to enable it to land on water.
      • ‘Up to that point, the aircraft flew with pontoons for water landings, but those were replaced by wheels for the flight across the Asian subcontinent and thence to France and the United Kingdom.’
      • ‘Optional inflatable pontoons can be fitted for emergency deployment on water.’
      • ‘The Kingfisher landed safely in the rough water and taxied over to Kanze, who reached up to grasp a wing pontoon.’
      • ‘While waiting for help to arrive, the crew haggled with missionary priests for wine, rice and yams, and struggled to keep curious natives off the pontoons used for water landings.’
      • ‘With drag from pontoons and floats removed, the OS2Us had greater speed and could carry heavier loads of bombs.’
  • 2A large flat-bottomed barge or lighter equipped with cranes and tackle for careening ships and salvage work.

    • ‘The Port Service's crane toppled as the Able Seaman was lifting a steel workbench from the tray of a semi-trailer on to a pontoon being used for maintenance work on the sail training ship Young Endeavour.’
    • ‘This is a crane that's been designed by Chris Mitchell, what he calls an access dinghy system, and this is the crane that he uses off the pontoons, yes.’
    • ‘Aqis spokeswoman Jen O'Reilly said the consignment also included a tug, pontoons, cranes, forklift and anchor.’
    • ‘As this edition of Navy News was going to press a number of pontoons and moorings were being secured to the seabed around the warship.’

Origin

Late 17th century: from French ponton, from Latin ponto, ponton-, from pons, pont- bridge.

Pronunciation:

pontoon

/pɒnˈtuːn/

Main definitions of pontoon in English

: pontoon1pontoon2

pontoon2

noun

British
  • 1[mass noun] The card game blackjack or vingt-et-un.

    ‘he got me to go into his room for a hand of pontoon’
    • ‘These are useful in many ways, not least as a betting tokens for playing pontoon, we've found!’
    • ‘Before Mrs Bs arrived, I was playing pontoon with Kerstie.’
    • ‘In blackjack, or pontoon as it is known in Britain, the aim is to get a hand that totals 21, or as near 21 as possible without going over.’
    1. 1.1[count noun]A hand of two cards totalling 21 in pontoon.
      • ‘If the banker does not have a pontoon then, beginning with the player to dealer's left and continuing clockwise, the players each have a turn to try to improve their hand if they wish by acquiring extra cards.’
      • ‘If no one had a Pontoon, the dealer adds all the used cards to the bottom of the pack and without shuffling deals a new hand.’

Origin

Early 20th century: probably an alteration of vingt-et-un twenty-one.

Pronunciation:

pontoon

/pɒnˈtuːn/